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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 6, 1984 – May 9, 1985"

Vol. 56, nos. 1 - 25 



September 6, 1984- 

May9, 1985 



LIBRARY ^ 
CLARION UNIVERSITY 
CLARION PA. 



4 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Title 


Date 


Page 


Activity Fee funds Clarion campus organizations 


March 21, 1985 


14 


Administration causes frustration 


April 18, 1985 


8 


African crisis panel convenes 


March/, 1985 


10 


Aharrah, Ernest: Biology profs have little free time 


Novembers, 1984 


11 


Aharrah, Ernest: receives Distinguished Alumni Award 


May 9, 1985 


19 


Ako, Edward: guest lecturer on the Harlem Renaissance 


April 18, 1985 


11 


Alcibiade, Jim: places at Youngstown ttourney 


October 4, 1984 


14 


ALF 1984 photo spread 


October 18, 1984 


10 


ALF autorama offers something for everyone 


October 18, 1984 


7 


ALF bed race 


October 4, 1984 


3 


ALF merits state award 


October 25, 1984 


1 


ALF seeks 1985 theme 


March?, 1985 


6 


ALF undergoing changes 


September 27, 1984 


4 


Ali-Zaidi, Dr.: addresses Faculty Senate 


October 11, 1984 


4 


All-Star Pro Wrestling comes to Clarion 


May 9, 1985 


S 


Alpha Gamma Mu honor society reinstated 


September 20, 1984 


9 


Alumni Day to be held 


May 2, 1985 


S 


Alzheimer's seminar slated 


March 21. 1985 


7 


Anderson, John: to speak at CU 


September 27, 1984 


1 


APSCUF nears faculty contract acceptance 


Novembers, 1984 


5 


APSCUF problems lead to strike thoughts 


May 9, 1985 


1 


Arts Festival description 


March 21, 1985 


1 


Bair, Tina: 7-time All-American 


April 25, 1985 


18 


Balka, Leigh: receives English award 


October 18, 1984 


5 


Banner, Kenneth: assumes Koinonia post 


February 21, 1985 


5 


Baptist, Francis: displays work at Sandford Gallery 


May 9, 1985 


22 


Barlow, Art: bio 


April 25, 1985 


13 


Bartels, Deborah: CU's funniest student 


February 28, 1985 


1 


Baschnagel, Norbert: to direct adult/youth tennis school 


May 9, 1985 


31 


Baschnagel, Norbert: to offer "Fitness Forever" course 


February 28, 1985 


12 


Baseball: CU finishes 2nd in conference 


May 9, 1985 


28 


Baseball: Eagles continue struggle 


April 25, 1985 


17 


Baseball: Eagles split with lUP 


May 2, 1985 


17 


Baseball: team looking for another crown 


April 18, 1985 


21 


Basketball, men's: CU slips past Mercyhurst 


January 24, 1985 


14 


Basketball, men's: CU takes third at tip-off tourney 


Decembers, 1984 


20 


Basketball, men's: Eagles fall to lUP and rise over Edinboro 


January 31, 1985 ^ 


12 


Basketball, men's: Eagles roll over Rock; take conference 


February 28, 1985 


13 


Basketball, men's: Eagles' streak unbroken 


February 21, 1985 


13 


Basketball, men's: Golden Eagles defeat Dyke Deamons 


February 7, 1985 


16 


Basketball, men's: hard work equals victory 


November 1, 1984 


13 


Basketball, men's: season roster 


Septembers, 1984 


^19^- 


Basketball, men's: squad boosts records 


February 14, 1985 


1 


Basketball, men's: Taylor's squad geared for tip-off 


November 15, 1984 


IS 


Basketball, men's: Vulcans down Eagles for PSAC West win 


March 7, 1985 


15 


Basketball, women's: ladies net first season victory 


January 24, 1985 


13 


Basketball, women's: lady cagers wrap up season 


February 28, 1985 


14 


Basketball, women's: Lady Eagles beat 'Boro 


January 31, 1985 


13 


Basketball, women's: Lady Eagles fall to SR, come back against GC 


February 7, 1985 


IS 


Basketball, women's: lady hoopers returning with renewed enthusiasm 


Decembers, 1984 


1S 


Basketball, women's: lady netters drop two 


February 21, 1985 


13 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Basketball, women's: lady netters serve up Sl^incent's 

Basketball, women's: lady netters start strong but slack off later 

Basketball, women's: team announces '85 recruits 

Bednar, Traci: wins Hart Award 

Beichner, Jim: Ail-American 



Beichner, Jinn^at Nationals 

Beichner, Jim: champion at {SAC wrestling tourney 



Beichner, Jim: EWL champ 

Beichner, Jim: heads to Utah for east-west match-up 
Bey, Erik: wins CU Presiden tial Scholarship 



Biology Clubjravels to^irgin[a 
Black, Donald Fisher: to present recital 
Blochberger, Charles: bio 



Bond, Thomas: an d wife set card c ontest 
Bond, Thomas: discusses Indonesian trip 



Bond, Thomas: Indonesia trip "no vacation^ 



Bond, Thomas: recommende d for 3- year co ntract, salary boost 

Bond, Thomas : t o visit Indon esia 

Bond, Thomas: welcomes students 



Borowy, Ellen: named academic All-Am erica n 
B owling: in tra mural bow ling le ague roll-off 
Brown, Elton: Senior Spotlight 



Burgess, Rus s: spine-tingling perfo rmance 

Caesar, Terry: revie ws "My Anton ia' 

"Call" wins collegiate journalism award 



Callay, Brigitte: book revie w to air on ch an nel 5 



Campus Ministry to hold African crisis discussion 



Campus organizations up budget requests to make improvements 



Campus: asbestos removed from Tippin natatorium 



Campus: Becht Hall history 



Campus: Becht Hall renovated 



Campus: Becht Hall renovated 



Campus: Becht Hall undergoes repairs 



Campus: Becht open b y necessity 



Campus: Becker in stalls ne w sate llite dish 



Campus: buildi ngs have r eal pe rsona l ity 



Campus: Eagle's Den so ars h igh wi th service 



Campus: Fire damages Haskell House 



Cam pus: H a rvey H all' s commuter lounge 

Campus: Haskell Ho use services re locate d in Davis 
Campus: Haskell Hou se wo r ks p ositively 



Campus: new additions ch ange Chandler Dining Hall 

Campus: relic found in Bec ht 

Campus: SAFE - a bused vi ctims are fi ghting back 



Campus: Servomation believ es food sounds even more nutritious 
Carbol, Pat: athlete of the week 



Carlson Library installs new Business Colle ction service 



CAS makes final bid for dues collection to SSHE 



CAS organizes, combats cuts 



CAS rallies to tackle Capitol 



CAS says governor's budget request falls shorty 
CAS: what is student fee all about? 



September 20, 1984 
December 13, 1984 



May 9, 1985 



September 20, 1984 
March 21, 1985 



March 14, 1985 



January 31, 1985^ 
March?, 1985 



Jariuary 24, 1985 



Septembe r 20, 1984 



October 18, 1984 



March 14, 1985 



November 15, 1984 



November 1, 1984 



April 1 8, 198 5 



April 18, 1985^ 



April 25, 1985 



February 28, 1985 



Septembe rs, 1984 



December 6, 1984 



December 13, 1984 



October 11, 1984 



November 8, 1984 



December 13, 1984 



M ay 2, 198 5 



October 18, 1984 



Februa ry 21, 1985 



March 21, 1985 



May 9, 1985^ 



September 27, 1984 



September 20, 1984 



February 14, 1985 



November 1, 1984 



October 4, 1984 



September 20, 1984 



October 11, 1984 



October 4, 1984 



Febru ary 21, 198 5 



September 20, 1984 



March 14, 1985 



October 11, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



May 9, 1985 



May 2, 1985 



March 14, 1985 



October 25, 1984 



A pril 18, 198 5 



November 8, 1984 



March 14, 1985 



April 25, 1985 



Febru ary 14 , 1985 



February 7, 1985 



13 



19 



31 



8 



18 



15 



14 



14 



18 



19 



16 



12 



8 



11 



9 



15 



9 



Center Board attends ACU-I conference November 1, 1984 9 | 


Cheerleading, men's: add new twist to spirit squad 


September 27, 1984 i 12 


Christian organizations have much to offer 


October 4, 1984 


1 


Clarion blacked out 


September 20, 1984 


7 


Clarion Call tribute: 1923-1985 


May 9, 1985 


15 


Clarion Festival of the Arts photo layout 


May 9. 1985 


26 


Clarion Game: just like Monopoly, only better 


Decembers, 1984 


10 


Clarion Historical Society opens museum 


April 18, 1985 


14 


Clarion mayor takes issue with campus/community relations 


October 18, 1984 


15 


Clarion University Foundation benefits CU 


November 15, 1984 


10 


Clarion University Foundation drive nears end 


March 7, 1985 


7 


Clarion: "The Store" opens for business 


February 28, 1985 


9 


Clarion: Alumni House betters development 


May 2, 1985 


16 


Clarion: Anti-Horsethief Association tradition rides on 


January 31, 1985 


11 


Clarion: Clancy Ann's coming to Clarion 


March 14, 1985 


8 


Clarion: Exit 9 conditions examined 


February 14, 1985 


1 


Clarion: Express Shoppe - crafts 


February 7, 1985 


8 


Clarion: here comes Carpet Barn 


Decembers, 1984 


4 


Ciarion: historic Orpheum Theatre reopened 


November 1, 1984 


1 


Clarion: Liberty Towers under construction 


April 25, 1985 


8 


Clarion: new FM radio station to start 


May 2, 1985 


6 


Clarion: Sports Center - indoor tennis 


February?, 1985 


10 


Clarion's foreign enrollment increases 


March 14, 1985 


9 


Clark, Paul: at Nationals 


March 14, 1985 


15 


Clark, Paul: champion at PSAC wrestling tourney 


January 31, 1985 


14 


Classes held in spite of severe weather 


January 24, 1985 


1 


College Press Convention photo spread 


March 21, 1985 


16 


College Republicans promote Reagan 


November 1, 1984 


5 


Communication dept: responds to needs of profession 


January 24, 1985 


1 


Communications Dept adopts new curricular policy 


September 27, 1984 


2 


Competency test implemented 


November 15, 1984 


1 


Competency test used to determine accreditation 


Decembers, 1984 


1 


Concert: The Fixx 


September 20, 1984 


1 


Concert: The Fixx delivers 


September 27, 1984 


10 


Conference: Women in business 


Septembers, 1984 


1 


Copeland, Robert: goes over 100 


September 27, 1984 


8 


Crime: Borough police make arrest 


October 18, 1984 


1 


Crime: borough police report campus news 


September 20, 1984 


6 


Crime: Clarion landlord's discriminatory practices revealed 


December 13, 1984 


1 


Crime: Clarion police need testimonies to prosecute 


October 11, 1984 


4 


Crime: Clarion students arrested 


October 25, 1984 


4 


Crime: man hospitalized after Reimer scuffle 


October 25, 1984 


1 


Crime: police set up search for assailant 


October 11, 1984 


2 


Crime: student charged with auto theft 


January 31, 1985 


4 


Crime: two pedestrians injured in Grand Ave. incident 


December 13, 1984 


3 


Crime: woman hit near Wilkinson 


September 20, 1984 


3 


Cross-country, men's: CU takes one in quad meet 


October 25, 1984 


15 


Cross-country, men's: Harriers host Grove City and Mercyhurst 


October 18, 1984 


19 


Cross-country, men's: Harriers take 10th 


September 27, 1984 


15 


Cross-country, men's: Harriers trampis St. Bonny 


October 4, 1984 


13 


Cross-country, men's: split Gannon tri-meet 


October 11, 1984 


16 


Cross-country: Harriers fall to Lock Haven 


September 20, 1984 


14 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Cross-country: Harriers place 7th at^states 

CU converts boiler from gas to coal 

CU dropouts startle study^ 



Cu encourages area tourism 

CU grads in Career Day line-up _„ 

CU parking controversy explained _^ 

CU placesj4th in Eastern Wrestling League Championships 
CU ranks 4th in mmorityxecruiting 



CU retention program meets needs 

CU students take third in comrnujiication/marketirTg cont^ 

CU talliesjecord^nrollment 

CUW^5 raises mqriey for charjty 



Dancer^'Nutcrakej^SulteX comes tqCU^ 
Dance: Bav FroritB allet to perform 
Davis, Jack: bio 



Delaney, Scott: senior spotlight 

DeNardo^JdeMtojide in ALF p arade 

Departments use^ESFJunds 

Diving: ClJhosts invitation al 



Diving: d|\^r^quajifyJonTatoials^ 



Downing,^ Micjiaelj^io 

EaTly^Nldjiood Education^xp^ 
Ebner, Amy: wins Hart Award^ 



Edington^RobertMielpsJo^n new book 



Elementary^ prograriijqperT^tqanteac^^^ 
Engfer^^Rich: gues t lecturer onjriusicjndustry^ 



Engr am.Ma rk: named^to PSCA West 2ndjeairT^ 

Ewin^g,^ Kevin^namedPSAC-west^ ayer of the week 
EwingJ<eviri^^en]orspotligl^ 



Faculty^negotiates ne w contract 



Facujty^enate min utes 

Faculty Senate minutes 

Farnham^^>ean^and_Bettyj^^^ 



Fftrgusor^ Mayriarghjijw^band^deb uts at CU 
Finals schedule^to remajruj nchang ed 



Footballjj^ell ent" recruiting classjnriounced^ 
Foot balT: Big Indian sjpjJj Eagles 56-16 



Football: CU com es^from behind versus Bald^Eagles 



FqotoallTEagles^;66 h onore d 



Footbalh^gtes^peri^eason^^airr^ 

Football^^glesjA/rap^ Gerieya in season fi nale 

FootbpTGolden^agjes battjeVulcarT^ 

Footbarh Golden Eagles defeatScots^ 



Footbali^GoidexEaglesdrairijyiercyhur^ 



Fc^tba[l -^Golden Eagles fejljo^ 

Footbalh Golden Eagles slip past_Red Raiders 16-13 

Football: gridders conqueijitan s 15-10 

Football: Gridders^feirtoCheyney 



Football : grid^ej-sjoplay Tn 25th^nniversary game^ 



Fnnthflll:sprjnqjrills close as v arsity edges alumni 

Footbalhwrinmg^ight program 

Foreign Language banquet held 



November 1, 1984 
December 6, 1984 
October 18, 1984 
December 6, 1984 
October 11, 1984 



September 20, 1984^ 



March 7, 1985^ 

April 18, 1985 

September 6J984 
September 6, 1984_ 
Septembej; 20, 1984^ 
SeptemberiOJ984^ 



November 8, 1984 



jyiarch2VI985 
February7/I985^ 



November 8, 1 984 



October 11 J984 
Apriri8, 1985 



November 15, 1984 



December 13, 1984^ 



May 9 J 985^ 



April 18/1985^ 



^ptember^0J984 
FebruaryT j985~ 



May 9^1985^ 



February 21, 1985 



March21,J985 

Septe mber20^1984^ 

October 25, 1984 

May 2, 1985 



February 21/1985^ 
~Aprir25ri985 



February2M985^ 



March 14, 1985^ 



pecember6/[984 

];]April^J985_ 

October 18, 1984 



November 8, 1984 



May9/m5 



September6/[984^ 



"November 15, 1984 



October 4. 1984 



October 25, 1984^ 



jecembe r13, 1984 
OctoberTl7l984" 



Septe mber 27, 1984 
_Septembe^J984^ 



November 1,1984^ 



September6J98JL 



MayJi,J985 



Septernber 27 J 984 
May 2, 1985 



13 



12 



13 



14 



9 



8 



10 



14 



9 



19 



17 



20 



11 



8 



9 



12 



19 



16 



13 



10 



19 



20 



16 



29 



20 



20 



16 



14 



18 



15 



16 



16 



14 



18 



27 



15 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Foreigh Language Club promotes languages March 14, 1985 11 | 


Forensics Team back and strong as ever 


September 27, 1984 


8 


Forensics Team speaks up 


October 11, 1984 


1 12 


Forensics Team: visits Bloomberg 


November 15, 1984 9 | 


Fraternities: Alpha Phi Omega hosts Bowl for Liberty 


March 14, 1985 


1 


Fraternities: Alpha Phi Omega sponsors Dance-for-dystrophy 


November 8, 1984 


5 


Fraternities: Delta Chi initiated by nationals 


October 25, 1984 


8 


Fraternities: Phi Sigma Kappa new brothers 


December 6, 1984 


15 


Fraternities: Phi Sigma new pladges 


October 25, 1984 


10 


Funniest person contest to be held 


February 21, 1985 


4 


Gesin, Donna: wins Hart Award 


September 20, 1984 


8 


Gilford, Lawrence: bio 


January 31, 1985 


9 


Golf, men's: Eagle golfers place at Rock tourney 


September 27, 1984 


13 


Golf, men's: Eagle Hackers take second at lUP 


September 20, 1984 


15 


Golf: ALF tourney "good time" 


October 18, 1984 


18 


Golf: CU administrators take tourney 


September 20, 1984 


13 


Golf: CU golf tourney slated 


May 9, 1985 


30 


Golf: Hackers wrap up season 


October 18, 1984 


18 


Graduation changes set 


April 18, 1985 


1 


Greco, Francis: to study Milton ar ASU 


May 9, 1985 


14 


Greek: Greek community on comeback at CU 


May 2, 1985 


11 


Greek: Greek Week line-up 


April 18, 1985 


17 


Greek: Greek Week results 


May 2, 1985 


11 


Greek: IFC questions CU faculty on fraternities 


May 9, 1985 


24 


Grejda, Edward: receives Distinguished Alumni Award 


May 9, 1985 


19 


Grier, Amy: wins CU Presidential Scholarship 


September 20, 1984 


9 


Gymnastics, women's: CU edged by Bowling Green 


January 24, 1985 


12 


Gymnastics, women's: CU gymnasts conquer Canadians in tri-meet 


January 31, 1985 


1 


Gymnastics, women's: gymnasts edge Slippery Rock 


February 21, 1985 


15 


Gymnastics, women's: gymnasts tumble over William & Mary 


January 24, 1985 


16 


Gymnastics, women's: gymnasts win against lUP 


February 7, 1985 


18 


Gymnastics, women's:gymnasts finish remarkable season 


March 21, 1985 


20 


Gymnastics: gymnasts come too close for comfort at WVU 


February 14, 1985 


13 


Gymnastics:tumblers fall to Penn State 


December 13, 1984 


17 


Hannah, Mary: named SSHE vice-chancellor 


September 6, 1984 


2 


Hardwick, Mary: bio 


May 2, 1985 


13 


Harnish, Patricia: awarded accounting scholarship 


September 6, 1984 


16 


Haselrig, Ken: Ail-American 


March 21, 1985 


18 


Haselrig, Ken: at Nationals 


March 14. 1985 


15 


Haselrig, Ken: champion at PSAC wrestling tourney 


January 31, 1985 


14 


Haslett, Jon: named PSAC player of the week 


October 25, 1984 


12 


Hearst, Chris: bio 


March 7, 1985 


12 


Heckman, Kim: Miss CUP 


April 18, 1985 


18 


Hegewald, Irmgard: obituary 


February 7, 1985 


1 


Herman, Rich: bio 


November 1, 1984 


8 


Hetrick, R. Dennis: proposal accepted 


November 8, 1984 


3 


Hinga, Judy: bio 


September 20, 1984 


10 


Historical Society presents program on flight 


May 9, 1985 


13 


Homecoming 1984 court roster 


October 11, 1984 


1 


Homecoming 1984 set 


September 27, 1984 


2 


Humanities 120 students to visit New York 


May 9, 1985 


8 


IE speakers host ALF tourney 


October 25, 1984 


10 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



IE team wins all the way to Nationals 


April 25, 1985 


15 


lovino, Anthony: Mr. Indiana County 


Decembers, 1984 


IS 


Joslyn, Kathryn: visits Ivory Coasi 


September 20, 1984 


8 


Kelly, Jim: ALF parade grand marshal 


October 4, 1984 


4 


Khan, Mohammed: to speak on Afghanistan 


i October 11, 1984 


1 5 


Labino, Dominick: donates "Sea Kingdom" to CU 


March 7, 1985 


4 


Lance, Peter: guest lecturer on truth and ethics in journalism 


January 31, 1985 


1 


Larson, Allen: resignation 


December 13, 1984 


1 


"Last Great Lecture" series 


Decembers, 1984 


^ 11 


Lazich, Milutin: to perform in Pittsburgh 


October 4, 1984 


9 


Leach, Charles: receives Distinguished Alumni Award 


May 9, 1985 


19 


Library Media & Info Sci Society indexes historical local newspapers 


February 21, 1985 


^~ 9 


Library uses electronic mail 


Novembers, 1984 


4 


MacBeth, Bruce: to participate in technical writing seminar 


September 27, 1984 


7 


Madonna, G. Terry: re-elected APSCUF president 


Septembers, 1984 


15 


Maher, Tecie: asks help to save a friend 


October 25, 1984 


1 


Mamalo, Dori: going to Division 1 Championships 


March 21, 1985 


19 


Mamalo, Dori: takes 1st and 2nd at Nationals 


April 18, 1985 


22 


Managerial seminar slated 


March 14, 1985 


5 


Marketing dept: little things make a difference' 


October 11, 1984 


10 


McCauloff, Barry: bio 


February 21, 1985 


10 


McLain, John: finishes Clarion career 


April 18. 1985 


10 


Meister, Margaret: wins CU Presidential Scholarship 


September 20, 1984 


9 


Michalski, Stanley: conducts All-State Lions Band 


March 7, 1985 


11 


Michel, Thomas: gives interview seminar 


October 18, 1984 


13 


Miller, Bill: Coach of the year 


March 7, 1985 


13 


Miss CUP soon to shine 


February 21, 1985 


9 


Modern Germany slide show slated 


March 21. 1985 


S 


Modern Languages Dept. receives gifts 


April 18, 1985 


19 


Moeslein, Wendy: named academic All-American 


Decembers, 1984 


18 


Montecino, Alfonso: guest pianist 


February 21. 1985 


7 


Mueller, Susan: welcomed to CU Board of Trustees 


November 1, 1984 


5 


Mueller, Susan: welcomed to CU Council of Trustees 


September 27. 1984 


7 


Music: 4th annual Gala Concert held 


September 20, 1984 


10 


Music: Airbands 


May 2, 1985 


15 


Music: Airbands "explode" at Arts Festival 


May 2, 1985 


1 


Music: Budapest Brass Quintet visiting CU campus 


April 18, 1985 


13 


Music: Caruso plays CU 


April 18, 1985 


13 


Music: Chamber concerts set 


April 18, 1985 


5 


Music: Choral festival 


November 1. 1984 


7 


Music: Clarion Strings to present concert 


April 25. 1985 


9 


Music: Collegiate Choral Festival planned 


October 18, 1984 


4 


Music: CU Symphonic Band to present concert 


March 7. 1985 


5 


Music: Faculty Chamber to host concert 


Novembers. 1984 


2 


Music: Governor's school to perform chamber music 


February 28. 1985 


5 


Music: lUP faculty recital 


November 15. 1984 


S 


Music: Jazz Festival scheduled 


February 7, 1985 


10 


Music: Madrigal chorus 


Decembers. 1984 


15 


Music: Madrigal Singers 


November 15, 1984 


5 


Music: marching band plans finalized 


Septembers, 1984 


17 


Music: Maynard Ferguson's swingfest 


January 31, 1985 


4 


Music: percussion ensemble to perform 


March 21, 1985 


8 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Music: Sweet Thursday performance by Getaway 
Music: Sweet Thursday puts audience on feet 
Music: Venango Chorus concert^cheduled 
Music: Westminste7singej"s to perform 
Nair, Donald: requests reassignment ~ 
New finals schedule adopted 



New fina[s schedule d[scus^edbyFaculty^enate 
New finals schedule displea^sJFaculty Senate 
New scholarsh[ps offered 
Newpher,J^im: takes K XAS produced 
Nuclearwajte semi nar sp onsored " 

O'Connor, Jeanne:^goesfo^ 
PA education^ to lose millions in aid 



P ayne, P at:depart^itoBoston^ 
PhijtaSigmahorTor s ocietyTe ducesjonfu^on 



f^nothon raises moriey for CU alumni 



Photographic JiistojTof 1985 



Planetariumihosts^TTieBe^ 
Proposed Honqrs^rogram:^ views 



PSEA jistinctionsgain ed by CU 
PjJSH group focuses on^speclal needs' 



Qujnji^^Jormari_"But^^ 
R acquetba lhjtourneyhuge success 
RacquetbaN: tourne y sla ted 



Rape Qlsis Center^expand^ 
ReadjngJ)ayj success^aysj^a^^ 



Reguirement s set fo r class o f '89 
Rifle Team: lowdown 



RifleJTeaiTv shootere^ap^ season 



RifleJeanr^ho^ersTav^ 
RifleTeam:^ootersjTit5ujl^^ 



gL^eTearn:^hooters^we^ matches 
Rifle teafn Tshooterslake second 



Rifle J[earii.;^hooterslopDuquesne 



Riflejeami^^hooter^^^ 



Rillin^g,^jy[issyrbio 

Ringel, Diane:jTired'b7Smuc^ 

M^^k^yiJeiyliwiris^ ~ 

RossTwIlliamrb b ~ 

ROTC students salute VVest Point 

Ruberrj^JVic^goes^forOjym^^ 

Ruberry,^/ic:^eriiorspotlight 



Rural Ljbrananship^enterlJnks^ 
SarTdford^llery^d|sp[ays[nterriato^ 



Schu[,j;cott^wiris]PresJ^^ Scholarship 

Scranton^WnnamTto^peak 

S^ajTor,^Suzje:^playerofthe~\^^ 

Searchjornew Dean^of^rtsand'Sciences^contlnueT 
SemestersJongerat^U 



''SeqjieNe"^rovides photographic merrio^^^^ 

Series 2 Software instaHedWcampus^fflnistratiorr 

Seufert, Chris: goes for Olympic gold in swimming 



January 31, 1985 

February 7.^ 1985 

jNlovember 1 5, 1 984 

Ap ril 18, 1 9815 



May9J985 



November^, 1984^ 
November 8, 1 98T 
Noyembei^S, 1984 
October 1 1.1 984^ 



^October 18, 1984 

April 25^^85_^ 
_Se^tember 27,J984 
Marehj1^j985 
February28, 1985^ 



J^qyemberlS, 1984 



Dece mber^lsTl 984 



May 9, 1985 



December^[37T984 



AprlM8^1985 



May 9, 198 5 

jJanua^^4^J985^ 

i^arch7ri985 



February21j[985^ 
February 7, 1985 



October 4. 1984 



jJanuary3V[985^ 



March HJ985 

_October25ri984' 

MarchTTigss^ 



December 13, 1984 



^ebruary7^1985^ 



Febru ary21^1985^ 



FebruaryJ4J^85 



Novem ber 8. 1984 



NovemberTri984^ 



SepterTiber^7J984 
Septem ber6ri984 



Septembe r2M984 

_J4archjI4ri985^ 

February28^^ 



September 27, 1984 



FebruaryHJ985^ 



December 13. 1984 



March 2 1^1985 

_September^, 1984^ 



^epjember27j 984 
J^oyember 1, 1984 



March 21 J985 
_May9J985^ 
^priM8^^985^ 

March 7. 1985 



14 



15 



IS 



12 



14 



11 



S 



10 



25 



10 



15 



18 



12 
3 



1 



12 



15 



19 



17 



15 



14 



14 



15 



8 



IS 



8 



8 



8 



14 



15 



15 



12 



9 



19 



September 27, 1984i 14^ 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Shaffer: Robert: pleased with new student attitude 
Sheraw, Darrel: edits satire 



Shumaker, Ronald: seminar on Romantic Literary Theater 

Small Business Appreciation week set 

Small Business Center hosts DuBois conference 

Small Business Center receives award 

Small Business Conference to be held 

Smirnoff, Yakov: to perform at CU 

Smith, Bob: senior spotlight 

Smith, C. Gordon: bio 



Smith, Jay: named CU gymnastics coach 

Smith,^L.wT: photography to be shown at Sandford Gallery 

Society for Collegiate Journalists returns wit h pr ide 

Softball: lady Eagles canYfind bats to back pitching 

Softball : Lady Eagles pl ay in w eekend tourney 

Softbalh team blasts Gro ve City in opener 

Softball: women drop 3 of 4 



Sororities : Alpha Sigma Alpha jTew^isters 
SoroTities: Alph a Sigm a Alphaupdate 



Sororities: Alpha^Sigma^Tau new sjsters^ 



Sororities: Alpha Xi asks help to save afriend^ 



Sororities: Delta Zeta homec oming candidat es 



Sororities: Delta Zeja new pled ges 
Sororities: Phi Sigma Sigma 



SororTties:^hi Sigrna Signna new sjstere 



Sororities : Si gma Sigma Si gma ho mecoming candida tes 



Sororities: Sigma Sigma^[gma new offic ers and sisters 
S^ori^ies: Sigma Sigma S^[gma new s^ 



Sororities: S igma Sigma Sigm a update 
Speciahed joa|d special students 
Speech^Clinic pla ns partial move 
S peech T eam r anks third 



Spring festival ofthe^Arts sch edule 
SSHE adopts jnissio n statement 



SSHE Board ofGovernors ad opts new alloca tion plan 

SSHE budget heari ngs in session 

SS HE developsjfutui^sjrategies 

SSHE nets millions after cuts 



SSHE outlines fiscal needs 



SSHE plan co nside rs uni vers ity leadership^ 
SSHE presents budg et request 



SSHE sees increase m minority emptoyees^ 



SSHE s[ster reckons with Mid dle S tates group^ 



Stark, Frankiir : guestspe^keK)n U .N . reform 
Status o f Wo meiiconferenc e scheduled 

Student^enrollment ris es at CU 

Student Senate minutes 



Student Senate minutes 
Student Senate minutes 



Student Senate minutes 



Studen^ Senate minutes 
Student Senate minutes 



February 21, 1985 
_September20, 1984 
September 20, 1984 
May 2^ 1985 



October 18, 1984 



October 11, 1984 
April 18J985_ 



October 4, 1984 
js[ovember1,J984 
December 6, ^984^ 
November 8, 1984 



^bruary14, 1985^ 
April 25 , 1985 



Ap ril 25, 1985 



October 11, 1 984 
April 18, 1985 



May 2, 1985 



Decembers, 1984 



Sept ember 20 , 1984 



November 15, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



Septemb er 20, 1984 
October 25, 1984 



Septemb ers, 1984 



November 15, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



Decembers, 1984 



November 15, 1984 



Septemb er 20, 1984 



April 25, 1985 



March 21, 1985 



Septemb er 27, 198 4 



Ma y 2, 1985 



October 25, 1984 



October 18, 1984 



March 14, 1985 



Novembers, 1984 



Sept emb ers, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



December 13, 1984 



November 15, 1984 



Decembers, 1984 



A pril 18, 1 985 



November 15, 1984 



February 28, 1985 



February 21 J 985 



November 1, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



February 7, 1985 



February 21, 1 985 



February28,J985^ 
"March 7,1985 



11 



9 



13 



10 



15 



13 



18 



14 



23 



19 



15 



10 



14 



10 



10 



12 



14 



10 



15 



14 



10 



8 



11 



8 



12 



8 



8 



8 



8 



S 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Student Senate minutes 
Student Senate minutes 



Student Senate minutes^ 
Student Senate minutes 



S tude nt Senate minutes 
Student Senate minutes 



Student Senateminutes^ 
Student Senate roster 



Student-fan restrictions deemed unnecessary 
Summer school problems continue 



Surve y revea ls quality of education at C larior 



Swimmi ng, me n's: "Beasts" PSAC champs 



Swimming, men' s: conquer Shippensburg 



Sw imming , men's: CU pla ces 5th at N a tional s 
Swim ming, men's: q uali ^ for nationa ls at^ippensburg 



Swimmi n g, men's: swimmers beat Dennis on and Kutztown 



Swimming, m en's: swimmers gasp for air at week end meets 



Swi mmi n g, men's: swimme rs prepare for states 



Swi mming, men's: swimmers qualify for nationals 



Swimming, women's: despite loss, women qualify for 7 nationals 



Swimming, women's: long road trip doesn't phase women swimmers 



Swimming, women's: overwhelm Blo omsburg 



Swimming, women's: swimmers qualify for nationals 



Swim ming, w o men's: swimmin' women domi nate Youngstown 



Swimming, women's: swimmin' wom e n prepare to defen d national title 



Swimming, women's: s wimmin' women steal 10th st raight states 
Swim ming, women's: swimmin' women venture to P uerto RTco 



S wimming, women's: women swimmers & divers receive awards 
S wimming, women's: women ta ke 3rd 



Swimming: captain roster for 1984-85 



Switzer, Patricia: wins Hart Award 



Tech conferences hosted by CU 



Tennis, women's: battles Rock 



Tennis, women's: lady netters finish season 



Tennis, women's: Netters top Cal ifornia 



Tennis, women's: season roster 



Tennis, women's: team to compete in PSAC playoffs 



Tennis: ALF tourney "huge success" 



Tennis: open slated as ALF annual event 



Theater: 



Theater: 



Theater: 



"Angel Street" reviewed 



Theater: 



"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and "Angel Street" 



Theater: 



"Cat o n a Hot Tin Roof a n d "Angel Stre et" 



Theater: 



Theater: 



Theater: 



Theater: 



Theater: 



"Angel Street" 



"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" deconstructed 



"Godspell" reviewed 



"Showboat" 



"The Devil, You Say?" 



"The Dining Room" 



"The Dining Room" expertly directed 



Theater: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 



Theater: Standing Room Only series to present "Frankenstein" 



Town prepares for "I Love Clarion" Day 



March 14, 1985 



April 18 . 1985 



^pril^S, 1985^ 
Ma y 2, 1985 



M ay 9, 198 5 



November 15, 1984 



Novembers, 1984 



January 31, 1995 



March 21, 1985 



November 1, 1984 



May 9, 1985 



March 7. 1985 



Decembers, 1984 



March 21. 1985 



Novembers, 1984 



February 14, 1985 



January 31. 1985 



February 28, 1985 



December 13, 1984 



January 24. 1985 



January 31, 1985 



February 21. 1985 



December 1 3, 1984 



February 14, 1985 



November 15, 1984 



February 28, 1985 



January 24, 1985 



May 9. 1985 



March 21, 1985 



October 18, 1984 



September 20, 1984 



October 11. 1984 



October 11, 1984 



November 15, 1984 



September 27. 1984 



Septembers. 1984 



October 18, 1984 



October 18. 1984 



September 20. 1984 



November 1 , 1984 



November 15, 1984 



September 27. 1984 



September 27 . 1984 



October 11, 1984 



December 13, 1984 



February 21, 1985 



November 1, 1984 



April 18, 1985 



April 25. 1985 



September 2 0. 1984 



January 24, 1985 



May 9. 1985 



5 



S 



13 



18 



17 



14 



13 



14 



14 



17 



12 



13 



14 



17 



15 



17 



12 



29 



19 



17 



8 



1S 



19 



18 



18 



19 



13 



8 



8 



12 



12 



10 



INDEX - Clarion Call Sept 1984 - May 1985 



Track, men's: seniors to maintain strength with^unHniited potenitia[ 
Track, men's: tracksters gearing for season _ 

Track, women's: lady trac ksters focu s on indiv idual performances 

Tray nor, Ken: bio __^ 

Tripodi, Lou: bio 



Trombetta, tracey: pumps iron for fitness 

Truitt-Bean, Gayle: resigns 

Tu, Ngo Dinh: bio 

Tuition hike looms if SSHE loses out 



Turchick, Stephen: wins accounting award 

Tuj-key^hoot held at CU 

United Campus Ministry tojiold retreat 



Upin, Munya: opens metal ar t work shop 

Van Dorn, Jerryj visit ing C U campus 

VanLandingham^ Mar gue rite: named d ean of coll of business admin 



Venango sjudy^pens doo rs to child abuse 



Volleyball, me n's: se ason starts 

VolleybaJI, men's: spikers ha ve co nsist ency p r oblem w ith lUP 
VoTleybari, jjen's: team re fuses to los e optimi sm, drops to lUP 
Vo[ley ban, women's: lad y spikers a re awesome 



Voll eybal l, wome n's: lady spikers awa re of team concept 
Vol leyball, women's: Lady Spikers in PSACs at Bore 
Voll eyball, wom en's: la dy spikers travel to Buckne ll tourne> 
Volfeyball, w omen's: la dy s pikers vic torious 



Volleyball, wom en's: spikers ta k e third at boro 
Wassink, Hal: bio 



WCCB sp onsors D ance-for-dystrophy 



WCUC celebrat es 8th anniversary 
WCUC fund-raising drive begins 



WCUC sponsors ch oral concert 



WCUC sports team honored by AP 



Wells, Lawrence: present s perc ussion recital 



Whiten, Darrylj^named to P SAC West 2nd team 



Whiten, D arry l : senio r spotli ght 

Williams, Willie: wins Presidential Scholarship 

Wilshire, Ron: bio 



Wrestling: Cu pr oduces 3 champ ions at P SAC tourney 



Wrestl ing: CU taken to m a t by Bloom sburg 



Wrestling: CU's you ng gr appl ers ready 

VVrestling: Grapple rs control UPJ 

Wrestling: grappl ers pin for more wins 
Wrestling: grap plers sub due Kent State 



Wrestling:jtapplers drop tough battle to PSU 



Wrestling: wrestlers beat lUP, lose to Lo ck Haven^ 
Wrestling: wrestlers sponsor kids' tou rney 



Wrestling: wrestlers tame Panthers, falt er a t Ml Quads 
Wrestling: WVU and Domin[on fall Jo matmen 



Yori, Amanda: Pittsburgh Children's Hospital poster child 



AprH 18^1985 
March 14, 1985 



ApriM8, 19^5 

february 14, 1^985 

March 21, 1985 



May 2, 198 5 



October 4, 1984 



October 11, 1984 



March 21, 1985 



September20^1984 
November 15, 1984 



January 24^1985^ 
March 14, 1985 



Ap ril 18, 19 85 



September 6, 1984 



January 31 , 1985 



February?, 198^ 



February 14. 1985 



February 28, 1985 



October 11, 1984 



September 20, 1984 



October 18, 1984 



Septe mber 27, 1984 



October 25, 1984 



November 1, 1984 



October 4, 1984 



November 8, 1984 



April 25, 1985 



April 18, 1985 



December 6, 1984 



May 9, 1985 



January 3 1, 1985 



March 21, 1985 



January 31, 1985 



September 20, 1984 



November 8, 1984 



January 31, 1985 



January 24, 1985 



November 15, 1984 



December 6, 1984 



Febru ary 14, 1985 



February 21, 1985 



January 24, 1985^ 



Feb ruary? , 1 985 



Janu ary 31, 1985 



February 28^ 1 985 



December 13, 1984 



Decembers, 1984 



21 

13 



24 
8 



10 



18 



12 



10 



11 



13 



10 



15 
14 



13 



14 



14 



16 



15 



13 



15 



10 



24 



19 



15 



8 



14 



16 



15 



19 



13 



14 



17 



13 



12 



16 






K 



-'^ 



} 



State System nets $250 million after cuts 



.1^ V 



On Thursday, June 28, the Gen- 
eral Assembly passed an $8.5 billion 
budget for general fund expenses for 
the 1^4-85 fiscal year. Gov. Dick 
Thomburgh held it briefly to insure 
adoption of an acceptable tax pack- 
age but still signed it in time for the 
midnight June 30th deadline. The 
tax cuts reduce the corporate 
income tax by 1 percent, to 9.5 per- 
cent, and the personal income tax to 
2.35 percent on July 1. 

The State System will receive an 
appropriation of $250,051,000, up 
about 6.4 percent from last year's 
$235,053,000. This is still .6 percent 
below the Governor's proposal for 
$251,507,000. The cut occurred in the 



Conference Committee which draft- 
ed final version of the bill, one on 
which legislators could only vote yes 
or no. 

The reduction was the result of 
action by the SSHE Board of Gover- 
nors at its June 19 meeting, at which 
time the budget bill was already in 
the Conference Committee. The 
Board adopted a tuition waiver auth- 
orization for up to 1 percent of 
fulltime student enrollment and also 
authorized the purchase of a house 
near Harrisburg for use by the Chan- 
cellor. At the same time it voted to 
increase the basic student tuition fee 
by $90 annually. Republican mem- 
bers of the Conference Committee 



insisted on adding up the "cost" of 
the tuition waiver and the purchase 
price of the house - $1,456,000 - and 
deducting that total from next year's 
appropriation. 

Even many of the System's 
friends on the Hill were upset over 
the Board actions, particularly be- 
cause they had occurred without ad- 
vance notice. The System has yet to 
hire an experienced legislative liai- 
son, which might have avoided the 
communication problem and the 
funding loss. 

In addition to the overall appro- 
priation, the budget also contains 
$200,000 "To enhance the recruit- 
ment and retention of minority stu- 



dents and faculty" and an additional 
$2,472,000 for Cheyney University in 
accordance with the agreement 
arising from the Office of Civil 
Rights case. 

APSCUF President G. Terry Ma- 
donna expressed regret over the 
funding reduction, which for the 
second year in a row provides the 
SSHE with a smaller percentage in- 
creases than other segments of the 
higher education community receiv- 
ing state monies, but he noted that 
the percentage of the increase is still 
better than those of recent years. He 
also expressed the belief that the cut 
does not reflect the feelings of the 
majority of the House and Senate 



but rather the unfortunate timing 
which gave an opportunity to three 
of the 253 legislators to prevail. 

The appropriation bill, Senate Bill 
878, Printer's Number 2218, also has 
a provision that "No one university 
shall receive an increase of less than 
four percent nor more than 10 per- 
cent over the budget amount for the 
proceeding fiscal year." This will 
have an effect on the new allocation 
formula adopted by the Board of 
Governors. If this limitation stands, 
it will be an unfortunate precedent 
and a further restriction upon the 
flexibility of the new System that 
Act 188 was to provide. 




Volume 56, No. 1 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



dliMMj (Luiwiwtjf 0^ fewiAij^wuiia/ 




Bond welcomes students; 
sees continued successes 



By Dr. Thomas A. Bond 

President, Clarion University 

We are looking to the 1984-85 aca- 
demic year with great optimism 
based on last year's record. Last 
year was a transition period from 
state college to university status and 
this year we will continue to strength- 
en our new system. Clarion is proud 
of its tradition of a fine academic in- 
stitution and we are continuing to 
make improvements in the univer- 
sity which will continue this tradi- 
tion. 

Reorganization within the aca- 
demic affairs department has allow- 
ed us to strengthen an already 
strong program. An administrative 
structure is now functioning that will 
better meet needs of faculty and stu- 
dents. Administrative changes 
within this unit during the past year 
have addressed the areas of aca- 
demic retention, educational oppor- 
tunities program, special services, 
tutoring, institutional research, ad- 
missions and records. 

The university is also implement- 
ing a task force that will deal with 
the challenges of improving educa- 
tion and at the same time enhancing 
Clarion's reputation as a center for 
excellence. The task force on excel- 
lence for Clarion is expected to deal 
with a unified plan for a program of 
partnership with secondary schools 
to encourage and contribute to ex- 
cellence in high schools; develop a 
comprehensive program for re- 
cruiting, admitting, and serving 
high achieving students (including 
an honors curriculum) ; further ac- 
creditation of professional pro- 
grams; development of an incentive 
program for faculty professional de- 
velopment; and development of an 
integrated publicity and fund raising 
program in connection with the 
overall task force program. 

The development area was also 
strengthened this past year with the 
appointment of a vice president for 
development and institutional ad- 
vancement. Development areas 
such as fund raising, public rela- 
tions, alumni affairs and sports in- 
formation will be stressed in im- 
proving the image of Clarion Uni- 
versity during the 1984-85 academic 




PRESIDENT THOMAS BOND 

Sequelle 1983 photo 

year. 

Not only our academic and de- 
velopment programs provide 
reasons for optimism in the current 
school year. Our athletic programs 
continued their successful tradition 
last year, providing the base for a 
continuation this year. Last year, 
the women's swimming team cap- 
tured another national champion- 
ship and the men's team finished 
third in the nation. Clarion was also 
represented in national competition 
at the NCAA Division I level by our 
wrestling team. State titles were 
also won by the men and women's 
swim teams and second place state 
finishes by baseball and gymnastics. 
Baseball also won the western 
division championship of the state 
conference. 

Football, which won the state and 
western division title last year, 
opens this year with a great deal of 
promise. A pre-season NCAA Divi- 
sion II rankings published by Sports 
Illustrated lists the Golden Eagles 
as third in the nation, the highest 
pre-season ranking we have ever en- 
joyed. 

Enrollment continues to hold at a 
high level. Not only are we continu- 
ing to attract students at a time 
when all statistics show our enroll- 
ment should be dropping, we are at- 
tracting better qualified students. 

All the elements are in place for 
another good year at Clarion. 

I welcome all of you back for the 
1984-85 year and ask for your parti- 
cipation and support in converting 
our optimism into continued im- 
provements. 



Activities Day events set 



The Eighth Annual Activities Day 
is scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 16 
from 1-4 p.m. The purpose of this 
event is to make Clarion students 
aware of the activities sponsored by 
recognized campus organizations. 

During the summer orientation 
program, new students were encour- 
aged to attend Activities Day, 
making this a particularly good time 
to get acquainted with the new stu- 
dents and to get groups organized 
early in the semester. 

Organizations can sign up to par- 
ticipate in this event at the Student 
Activities Office in 105 Riemer 
Center. A "first come - first serve" 
policy is used to determine exhibit 
locations and to reserve exhibit 
tables. Guidelines for participation 
are availab^ at 105 Riemer or by 
calling ext. 2311. 

Highlights of the day include a 
three-hour performance by the jazz 
group "SAUD" and entertainment 
by Terri and Jerry's Traveling Va- 
riety Show, sponsored by Center 
Board. 

"SAUD," a five piece jazz unit 
from New York City, performs ex- 
clusively for colleges and universi- 
ties. 

The group includes: Rahn Burton, 
pianist, formerly with Art Blakey 
and the Jazz Messengers and Rash- 
aan Roland Kirk; bassist Chris 
White performed with Hubert Laws, 
Simon and Garfunkel, Bob Marley 
and the Police; Yusaf Ali, formerly 
with Gladys Knight and the Pips; 
Herbie Morgan on tenor sax, 
formerly with George Benson and 
Bruce Springsteen, and Galen, on 
flute, formerly with Melba Moore 
and Billy Taylor. 

A finale for the evening is the 
movie "Police Academy," sponsor- 
ed by the Inter-fraternity and Pan- 
hellenic Councils. The movie will be 
shown in the Marwick-Boyd Auditor- 

Foundation Phonothon 
needs callers 

Callers are needed for the annual 
Clarion University Foundation 
Alumni Phonothon Oct. 2 through 
Nov. 16. Fifteen callers, including 10 
regular and five alternate, will be 
hired at $3.35 per hour. For further 
information contact Al Kennedy this 
week in the Alumni House at 2334. 



ium at 8 p.m. Admission is free with 
a valid ID. 

Hal Wassink, Coordinator for 
Student Activities believes "the best 
way to learn about organizations on 
campus is to take part in Activities 
Day, and by the same token I don't 
want it to become one of those ac- 
tivities that you just do because 
you've done it seven times before." 

Fifty-one organizations partici- 
pated in last year's event and Was- 
sink is hoping that number of organ- 



izations and more to join in this 
year's Activities Day. 

"The more organizations there, 
the more successful the day," said 
Wassink. 

In case of rain, displays and tables 
will be moved to Marwick-Boyd and 
the lobby of the Fine Arts Center. 

Drawings for the Main Street Mer- 
chants prizes will take place be- 
tween 1 and 4 p.m. See details of the 
contest in the coupon section of the 
newspaper. 



Conference to be hosted 
for women in business 



A "Women in Business" confer- 
ence will be hosted by the Clarion 
University Small Business Develop- 
ment Center, the U.S. Small Busi- 
ness Administration and the Clarion 
Area Chamber of Commerce on 
Monday, Oct. 8. The conference will 
be held at the Clarion Sheraton Inn 
located at exit 9 of 1-80. 

The conference is designed for 
area business owners, persons 
involved in a decision making aspect 
of business as well as persons think- 
ing of going into business. 

The conference is scheduled to 
begin with a check-in at 8:30 a.m. 
Following opening remarks by 
prominent persons, the key note 
speaker, Sandy Dye, owner of Knot 
'n Plant, will speak about "The 
'Spark' to Move Ahead." 

The conference will be broken into 
three different sessions. During 
each session there will be three con- 
current presentations, with atten- 
dees able to indicate their prefer- 
ence for each session. 

Topics for the first session 
include: "Creative Start-Up Financ- 
ing," "Managing Stress" and "Keys 



to Successful Sales." The second 
session presentations are: 
'Business Planning Emphasizing 
Cash Management," "Time 
Management" and "Bookkeeping 
for Your Business." The final ses- 
sion will cover the topics of: "As- 
sertive Management," "Marketing 
Yourself and Your Business" and 
"Personnel Management." 

Following the final session there 
will be a social hour in the Sheraton 
Courtyard. 

There is a $25 registration fee 
which will include coffee and dough- 
nuts during check-in and breaks, 
lunch with a choice of two main 
courses, the Women in Business Di- 
rectory and other literature pertin- 
ent to business persons. 

There is a registration deadline of 
Friday, Sept. 21. For additional in- 
formation or to receive a brochure, 
contact the Small Business Develop- 
ment Center at 814-226-2060. Bro- 
chures are also available at public h- 
braries as well as the Clarion Area 
Chamber of Commerce office. Main 
Street, Clarion, PA 16214. 



ON THE INSIDE 



Editorial 2 

Letters 2 

Reagan 4 

Center Board 4 

Welcome Back 
Money Savers 3*20 



Classifieds 12 

Beer 14 

Chandler Menu 9 

Eagle recruits 19 

Football preview 20 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 




Welcome back. I hope you had a nice summer. 

That's all I want to say about the summer because by now you've 
probably answered the "Hey, how-you-doin' - How-was-your-summer" 
question a hundred times. 

However, by no means should anyone forget this summer. Like 
many of you, 1 took part in the joyous celebration of America that began 
on Memorial Day and didn't let up until Labor Day. 

I watched on television American athletes capture 174 medals at 
the Los Angeles Olympics and Lady Liberty prepared for her $30 million 
face lift. I took a keen interest in the nomination of a woman to campaign 
for the second highest office in the land and I enjoyed every mouthful of 
National Ice Cream Month - July. And I got goosebumps when yet an- 
other space shuttle was successfully launched and cheered when a 
national symbol - Smokey Bear - was commemorated on a stamp. 

And, like many of you, I was shocked by the massacre at a McDon- 
ald's in California, was puzzled by the early death of a man who fiercely 
loved running and got America into a virtual health craze, was upset by 
the deadly oil slick that threatened the Texas coast and sympathized 
with a young queen who lost her crown. 

Now, with our summers said and done, it's time to start another 
school year. Whether affected by national events or not, each of us 
made some changes in our lives. 

Changes have also been made in The Clarion Call. Many will 
not be visible, but internal changes are sure to benefit our readers. 

In this column I want to pinpoint some important topics that affect 
this campus and its students and faculty. I intend to ask some serious 
questions about this place we call home for nine months and I intend to 
get some answers. And I also hope to enlighten my readers about 
important and interesting topics they might not know about. 

All of the editorial departments have changed hands. For our 
readers this means concise, clear news reporting, refreshing features and 
action-capturing sports reports with photos to depict all the news, 
features and sports events. It also means, with the energies of the sales, 
advertising, business and circulation staffs combined, there will be more 
pages of news, features and sports to read and easy access to the paper 
each Thursday. 

Have a good semester. I know the staff of The Clarion Call will. 



Karen E. Hale 



//////////■////////////////////////////////////yj'///y,f////j'yy//////////y///////////////y//////////////A////////^^ 



PLEASE NOTE: An organizational meeting for all those interested 
in working on THE CLARION CALL will be Monday. Sept. 10 at 
7 p.m. in The CALL Office, Room 1. Harvey Hall. There will be no 
September 13 issue of THE CLARION CALL. 



« 



The Clarion Call 



Room 1 Harv«y Hail 



Clarion UnKraralty of PwtmylvMila 
Clarion, PmnayWanIa 16214 
nKMM814-22«-23M 



THE STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Features Editor MICHELE LaTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK 

Pfiotography Editor CHUCK LI2ZA 



Art Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CURKE SPENCE 

Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

Circulation Manager DENISE SHEEKY 

Advisors ART BARLOW, THERESA WAIDA 

THE CLARION CALL is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their columns from any source but reserve the right 
to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Friday. 

The opinions expres:ied in Ih6 editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinions of 
the university or of the stuaeni body. 

ADVERTISINQ RATES MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

Display Ads: Per column inch J2.50 Per Semester $5 

National: Per Agate Line $ .34 Per Academic Year $8 

THE CLARION CALL Is fundad by Student Activity Faa 



Hannah named to SSHE 
vice-chancellor post 



Mary Emily Hannah has been 
named to the position of Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Policy and 
Planning for the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE). Dr. Hannah began duties 
in SSHE Harrisburg headquarters 
on Aug. 15. 

James H. McCormick, System 
Qiancellor, announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Hannah following ap- 
proval by the SSHE Board of Gover- 
nors during the May 15 public meet- 
ing. At that time, the Board voted to 
retain Dr. Hannah for a three-year 
term at an annual salary of $60,000. 

"The new vice chancellor has es- 
tablished a superior record in schol- 
arship and in higher education ad- 
ministration," says Dr. McCormick. 

"Her credentials are impec- 
cable," he adds, "and her capabili- 
ties at both system and university- 
level executive offices have been 
ably demonstrated. We are ex- 
tremely fortunate to have attracted 

Superfund bill 
and political games 
questioned 

Dear Editor 

I have been following the recent 
debate between Wachob and Clinger 
on the Superfund biU with a great 
deal of interest. Congressman 
Qinger contends that the Demo- 
cratic committee member of the 
Public Works committee were 
"playing politics", that the issue is 
"complex", and that he denied com- 
mitting himself to a 10-fold increase 
in Superfund at a public meeting in 
Centre Hall. I attended this meeting 
in Centre Hall and in fact asked 
Congressman Clinger for his 
position on the Superfund bill. His 
response as reported in the CDT the 
following day, was that he "general- 
ly" favored a 10 fold increase. I am 
not a mathematician, but my calcu- 
lations show that Congressman Gin- 
ger's vote to reduce the Superfund to 
only 6.2 billion dollars is not a 10 fold 
increase "generally" or otherwise. I 
am also not a lawyer, but Congress- 
man dinger's vote to limit the legal 
responsibility of companies to clean 
up toxic waste sites is quite simply a 
vote against the economic and en- 
vironmental wellbeing of our com- 
munities. My question to Congress- 
man Clinger is "who is playing poli- 
tics"? 

Sincerely, 

Glenn Soberman 

Organizer, Pennsylvania 

Public Interest Coalition 

108 W. Beaver Avenue 

State College, PA 

814-234-3565 

Inmate seeks 
pen pal 

Dear Editor: 

Sir, I am writing this letter in the 
hopes you will be able to print the 
following ad in your campus news- 
paper, as it is very important to me. 

WANTED: Behind the walls 
college student seeking correspon- 
dence from people that care. I am 
Irish, 24, brown hair, blue eyes, 6'1", 
180 lbs., I enjoy camping, swim- 
ming, motorcycling, and meeting 
new people, serving 3 years for bur- 
glary. All responses welcomed and 
answered. Your (dioto gets mine. 
Send to: ChiKk Nichols, No. 79-b- 
1610, Box 149, Attica, N.Y. 14011. 
Very Respectfully, 
Chuck Nichols. 



Dr. Hannah to the System." 

Dr. Hannah was selected from a 
pool of 50 applicants following a na- 
tional search, according to Nancy Z. 
Nelson, interim Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Policy and Planning. Dr. 
Nelson chaired the search commit- 
tee for the permanent post. 

According to Dr. Nelson, the Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Policy and 
Planning serves as the chief aca- 
demic officer of the System. Among 
the several charges, the Vice Chan- 
cellor is responsible for developing 
academic program approval, re- 
view, and evaluation procedures; 
articulating training and retraining 
needs of industry; developing part- 
nerships with basic education, and 
directing the development of institu- 



tional and System plans, including 
enrollment planning. 

Nelson, currently on leave from 
the academic vice presidency at 
California University of Pennsylva- 
nia, elected to return to that position 
before search procedures began. 
She has served as interim Vice 
Chancellor since July 1%3. 

"The Board of Governors, Chan- 
cellor's Office, and the university 
presidents are excited about Dr. 
Hannah joining the team," says 
McCormick. 

"We are confident that she will 
continue to advance the System," he 
says. "Dr. Hannah has a solid under- 
standing of the academic enterprise. 
She appreciates quality, high stand- 
ards, and accountability." 



I 




The FIXX, pictured above, is coming to the Clarion Stadium September 22. 
Tickets are available In RIemer 104. Admission for the 7 p.m. concert Is $7 
with I.D. See the Sept. 20 Issue of the Call for details of the group. 



•Do you have a good knowledge of politics, cur- 
rent national and world events? 

•Do you have a comical or satirical wit? 

•And can you express yourself in editorial 
cartoons? 

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING 
ACCEPTED FOR A STAFF CARTOONIST 



Payment per accepted 
cartoon 



Pick up and return completed 
applications to 
CLARION CALL OFFICE 

Room1 

Harvey Hall 




Deadline for applications is Wed., Sept. 12 



Alumni Association to 
award Wsciiolarsliips 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-3 



Ten $300 scholarships will be 
awarded this year to Clarion Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania students by 
the Clarion University Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Students must have completed one 
year at Clarion and are currently a 
full time student to be eligible for the 
scholarship. Application forms and 
further instructions may be obtained 
at the Alumni House on Wood Street. 

The Alumni Association is a pri- 
vate organization for the support of 



Clarion University through the or- 
ganization of special activities and 
publications for Clarion graduates 
and current students. 

Completed applications for the 
scholarships must be received at the 
Alumni House by Sept. 28. The 
Alunmi Association Directors will 
make the final awards during its 
October board meeting. 

A review of the applicants will 
center on both their standing at the 
university and need. 



Holiday Inn Sponsors 
pedal, paddle and hoof 




Registration for the first "Petal, 
Paddle and Hoof Race" is going on 
right now. 

Proceeds from the race will 
benefit Qiildren's Hospital in Pitts- 
l»irgh, and everyone 14 years and 
older is encouraged to participate. 

The race will begin at 10 a.m. on 
Sunday, Sept. 9 in the Clarion Holi- 
day Inn parking lot . In the first leg of 
the relay race, bicyclists will pedal 
from the Holiday Inn to Toby 
Bridge, then the second team 
member will paddle a canoe to 
Grady's cove, and finally, the third 
member will run back to the start- 
finish line at the Holiday Inn. 

The competition is broken down 
into various stages, with age brack- 
ets for both sexes. There is also a 



special category for individuals to 
compete in the tri-athalon, compet- 
ing in all three legs of the event 
alone. 

"niere will be free beverages and 
snacks for all participants, and win- 
ners in all team categories will earn 
troidiies and gift certificates. The 
tri-athalon winner will receive a 
grand prize. 

Donations are $10 for individuals 
and $25 for teams. Company spon- 
sorship is encouraged. 

Registratiwi may be made by 
calling 226-8682 or at the front desk 
of the Holiday Inn. 

The deadline for registration is 
Friday, Sept. 7. 



Students of Clarion University's Education Opportunities Program (EOP), a pre-college experience, recently heard 
U.S. Representative William Clinger talk to their call on Campaign '84 and the election process. Pictured are EOP 
Director Terri White, Victoria Verni, Rep. Clinger in6 Derek Pavers. 




WHENTOUBl 



IE 



'AST ENTREE 



Choose from Egg McMi 
or Scrambled Eggs, Sai 
we'll give you a free chillel 
per customer, per visit Pie 

Valid only at: 

MCDONALDS, 7th and Main Sts. 
Clarion, PA 



pot Cakes and Sausage, 
id M^ Browns. When you do, 
)fy3tf choice. Limit one coupon 
kesenf coupon when ordering. 

ExpiresOct. 15, 1984 




SUN 

September 1984 
Calendar of Events 





TUES. 



WED. 



EVERY SUNDAY 
3 PM-8 PM 

AII'U-Can-Eat 
DINNER BUFFET 

6.95 

Includes Salad Bar & 

Dessert Bar 

Sanlor Citizen* A 

Children under 12 S.»S 



IT'S BACK! 2 

THEOEJITEST 

pun 

DITOWll 

Every Sunday 
$5.00 cover charge 

AII-UCanDrink 
9p.m.-12a.m. 

Ibtr brands i draft beer) 



GRAND- 9 

PARENTS 
DAY 

Bring the grandparents 
to our Brunch Buffet 
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 
have an 8x10 Family 
Portrait taken for 
only $8.00. 

Includes sitting fee by 
M/J Parlter 



Every Sunday 16 
10a.m.-3p.m. 



5.25 



Senior Citizen* & Children 

(7-10)4 25 

Children 6 and under 

FREE 



23 

AMtRICAN 

NEWSAPER 

WEEK 

Sept 23-29 

Check Inside for 

more details 

30 



MON.-FRI. 

HAPPY 

HOUR 

2 fen 

4 PM-7 PM 



NEW! 
Kvery Mon. 
Wh:STF,RN MTE 

Non-ftop 
CJountry 4 Wntrm 

Music 

2 frr 19:30-10:30 

and l2:30-h30 



COUNTRY ^^ 
WINE& 
BEER 
BASH 

FREEFREE FREe 
Wine and beer from 9- 
!0 30 Compliments ot 
national Record Mart, plus 
special surprises. 



Every Monday 
5 PM-9 PM 

IUI-H-C«hEat 
UVEINOmONS 

Potato ot vegetable 
and salad bat 

4.95 



17 



24 

WINE AND 
CHEESE 
PARTY 

7 to 8 p.m. 

Winc&OiceM 

compUoients of 

Wayne Smith 

Beverage 



Lonely? 

DIAL 
226-4861 



Every Tuesday 

ITALIAN 

PASTA 

NIGHT 

Colorado Red prepares 
somethifi diHerent 
each and every week. 



WINES 11 

CHEESE 
PARTY 
7 to 8 p.m. 

FREE-FREE-FREE 

wine and Cheeac 

compltanente of 

WWCH In aarion 



EVERY 18 

TUESDAY 

tu:L mm 

99" Cocktails 

9PM-12AM 

plus Music from Itie 
50 s. 60 si 70s 



25 

DISCOVERY 
OF PACIFIC 

OCEAN 

PARTY 

Wear your beach clothesl 
tnjoy 99' cocktails 
from 9 p.m. -midnight 
Try our Beach Bomb 
Sl.OOallnitclong 



Every Mon-Sat. 

2 EGGS 

(any style) 
toast & jelly 

99^ 



Every 
Wednesday 
SOPHISTICATED 
LADIES MTE 

Featuring: 

tidy oi the Nile Awird 
plus 2 In I 
4PM-7PM:IOrM-l AM 



12 

NATIONAL 
SINGLES 
WEEK 
MIX AND MATCH 

PARTY 
Meet your oeilecl matcri 
and gel set tor a specipi 
surprise. 



Every Wed. 

BEER 

BATTER 

CHICKEN 

Potato ot vegetable 
plua full Hlad bat 
ONIY 

4.95 



19 



26 



Every 
Wednesday 

BUILD 
YOUR OWN 
TACOS 

FREE 

4 pjn.-7 p.m. 



THURS. 

Every Thursday 

STUK 
lYTNE OUNCE 

Filet 1.25 ot 

Strip 1.00 ox. 

Top Sirloin 7S ox. 

Ch. Steak SO ox. 

IncliMle* potato 
and aalad bar 

This Sat. 6 

Sept. 8 

NATIONAL 

NEIGHBORHOOD 

DAY 

Bring a neif^ibor in (or 
luitch and receive a 
tltEE lunch by purchas- 
ing one at equal or greater 
value. 

Every Thursday 13 

nCMvN 

PrexdekratiM 

25* Drafts 
4p.m.-12a.m. 

and 2 fer 1 
4 PM-7 PM and 

9PM12AM 

Every Thursday 20 

BUILD 
YOUR OWN 
WEINIE 

FREE 
4 PM-7 PM 

Every 27 

Mon-Sat. 

2 EGOS 

(any style) 

2 Bacon or 

Sausages 

Toast and |elly 

I 99 



NEW 
EVERY SATURDAY 

KING CRAB LEGS 

with potato or 

vegetable 
plus salad bar 

$10.95 



INSfffBIBBl 

mm 
umiEss 

ItHtmHl 
12 i 



Every Friday 1 4 
AllUCan Eat 

BEER 

BATTER 

FISH 

includes potato or 
yegetaoie plus salad bar. 

4.95 



smm 

onKinr 
*IMpkt» 



21 



Every Friday 28 

4 PM-7 PM 

Plus Surprise 

Happy '/3 Hours 

all nite long. 



BIG SCREEN ' 

VIDEO 
MACHINE 
1 year 
ANNIV. PARTY 

* Colorado ned's 
tamous spilted water- 
melon 

ii Name that Video 

* Surprise "Super Two" 



/UNDIE 8 
PARTY 

Be aure to wear youi 
undlea (but on the out- 
aide) lor aomc extra fun. 
Plut a (urpriec 
(••SUPER TWO"! 
All those wearlftg 
their undies on the out- 
ride drink 2 for 1 all 
nite long. 



Colorado Red 1 5 

& Magic 96 

presents 
THE 3rd ANNUAL 
PAJAMAPARTY 

FREE FREEFhfE 
Champagne toast at mid- 
mgnt compliments ot 
Magic 96 
WEARyOURPJs' 



1ST DAY OF 22 
AUTUMN 
FALLOUT 
PARTY 

All r*d, y«llow and or 
onga diinka hall price 
troiD 9 PM-Midnighl 
pluj a «p*cial 
SUPER TWO somatimc 
tooita! 



29 



HAPPY 

V4 YEAR 

PARTY 

Ring in lite last quarter 
of 1 984 witlittats. bal- 
loons, noise makers 
and FRU tioi dogs S. 
saucrltraui ai mid- 
night Plus a special 
SUPtR TWO 



^2Z?SSSSlSS?SS2S!SSSZZiSS:>-S:SSS!SZ?S^^ 




2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 




Welcome back. I hope you had a nice summer. 

That's all I want to say about the summer because by now you've 
probably answered the "Hey, how-you doin' - How-was-your-summer" 
question a hundred times. 

However, by no means should anyone forget this summer. Like 
many of you, I took part in the joyous celebration of America that began 
on Memorial Day and didn't let up until Labor Day. 

I watched on television American athletes capture 174 medals at 
the Los Angeles Olympics and Lady Liberty prepared for her $30 million 
face lift. 1 took a keen interest in the nomination of a woman to campaign 
for the second highest office in the land and I enjoyed every mouthful of 
National Ice Cream Month July. And I got goosebumps when yet an- 
other space shuttle was successfully launched and cheered when a 
national symbol Smokey Bear - was commemorated on a stamp. 

And, like many of you, 1 was shocked by the massacre at a McDon- 
ald's in California, was puzzled by the early death of a man who fiercely 
loved running and got America into a virtual health craze, was upset by 
the deadly oil slick that threatened the Texas coast and sympathized 
with a young queen who lost her crown. 

Now. with our summers said and done, it's time to start another 
school year. Whether affected by national events or not. each of us 
made some changes in our lives. 

Changes have also been made in The Clarion Call. Many will 
not be visible, but internal changes are sure to benefit our readers. 

In this column I want to pinpoint some important topics that affect 
this campus and its students and faculty. 1 intend to ask some serious 
questions about this place we call home for nine months and I intend to 
get some answers. And I also hope to enlighten my readers about 
important and interesting topics they might not know about. 

All of the editorial departments have changed hands. For our 
readers this means concise, clear news reporting, refreshing features and 
action-capturing sports reports with photos to depict all the news, 
features and sports events, it also means, with the energies of the sales, 
advertising, business and circulation staffs combined, there will be more 
pages of news, features and sports to read and easy access to the paper 
each Thursday. 

Have a good semester. I know the staff of The Clarion Call will. 



Karen E. Hale 



>'y'x>VX>'>'/'/'/>'/'/'X^/(>i^/'/Xyi^^ 



PLEASE NOTE: An organizational meeting for all those interested 
In working on THE CLARION CALL will be Monday, Sept. 10 at 
7 p.m. in The CALL Office, Room 1, Harvey Hall. There will be no 
September 13 issue of THE CLARION CALL. 



(^The Clarion Call 

VX^ Room 1 Harvey Hall 

Clarion Unlvartlly of Ptnnsylvania 
Clarion, Pannaylvania 16214 
Phona 814-226-2380 

THE STAFF 

E(?itorin-Chief KAREN HALE Art Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Features Editor MICHELE LaTOUR Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK Circulation Manager DENISE SHEEKY 

Photograptiy Editor CHUCK LI2ZA Advisors ART BARLOW, THERESA WAIDA 

THE CLARION CALL is published every Thursday during the school year In accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their columns from any source but reserve the right 
to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12.00 noon on Friday. 

The opinions expressed in 1ht> editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinions of 
the university or ot the stuoent twdy. 

ADVERTISING RATES MAIL SUBSCRIPTION RATES 

Display Ads Per coiurtin i.nch Si.' 50 Per Semester $5 

National; Per Agate Line $.34 Per Academic Year . . $8 

THE CLARION CALL Is lundad by StudanI Activity Faa 



Hannah named to SSHE 
vice-chancellor post 



Mary Emily Hannah has been 
named to the position of Vice Chan- 
cellor for Academic Policy and 
Planning for the Pennsylvania State 
System of Higher Education 
(SSHE). Dr. Hannah began duties 
in SSHE Harrisburg headquarters 
on Aug. 15. 

James H. McCormick, System 
Chancellor, announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Hannah following ap- 
proval by the SSHE Board of Gover 
nors during the May 15 public meet- 
ing. At that time, the Board voted to 
retain Dr. Hannah for a three-year 
term at an annual salary of $60,000. 

"The new vice chancellor has es- 
tablished a superior record in schol- 
arship and in higher education ad- 
ministration," says Dr. McCormick. 

"Her credentials are impec- 
cable," he adds, "and her capabili- 
ties at both system and university- 
level executive offices have been 
ably demonstrated. We are ex- 
tremely fortunate to have attracted 

Superfund bill 
and political games 
questioned 

Dear Editor 

I have been following the recent 
debate between Wachob and dinger 
on the Superfund bill with a great 
deal of interest. Congressman 
Clinger contends that the Demo- 
cratic committee member of the 
Public Works committee were 
"playing politics", that the issue is 
"complex", and that he denied com- 
mitting himself to a 10-fold increase 
in Superfund at a public meeting in 
Centre Hall. I attended this meeting 
in Centre Hall and in fact asked 
Congressman Clinger for his 
position on the Superfund bill. His 
response as reported in the CDT the 
following day, was that he "general- 
ly" favored a 10 fold increase. I am 
not a mathematician, but my calcu- 
lations show that Congressman din- 
ger's vote to reduce the Superfund to 
only 6.2 billion dollars is not a 10 fold 
increase "generally" or otherwise. I 
am also not a lawyer, but Congress- 
man dinger's vote to limit the legal 
responsibility of companies to clean 
up toxic waste sites is quite simply a 
vote against the economic and en- 
vironmental wellbeing of our com- 
munities. My question to Congr^s- 
man Clinger is "who is playing poli- 
tics"? 

Sincerely, 

Glenn Soberman 

Organizer, Pennsylvania 

Public Interest Coalition 

108 W. Beaver Avenue 

State College, PA 

814-234-3565 

Inmate seeks 
pen pal 

Dear Editor: 

Sir, I am writing this letter in the 
hopes you will be able to print the 
following ad in your campus news- 
paper, as it is very important to me. 

WANTED: Behind the walls 
college student seeking correspon- 
dence from people that care. I am 
Irish, 24, brown hair, blue eyes, 6'!", 
180 lbs., I enjoy camping, swim- 
ming, motorcycling, and meeting 
new people, serving 3 years for bur- 
glary. All responses welcomed and 
answered. Your photo gets mine. 
Send to: Chuck Nichols, No. 79-b- 
1610, Box 149, Attica, N.Y. 14011. 
Very Respectfully, 
Chuck Nichols. 



Dr. Hannah to the System." 

Dr. Hannah was selected from a 
pool of 50 applicants following a na- 
tional search, according to Nancy Z. 
Nelson, interim Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Policy and Planning. Dr. 
Nelson chaired the search commit- 
tee for the permanent post. 

According to Dr. Nelson, the Vice 
Chancellor for Academic Policy and 
Planning serves as the chief aca- 
demic officer of the System. Among 
the several charges, the Vice Chan- 
cellor is responsible for developing 
academic program approval, re- 
view, and evaluation procedures; 
articulating training and retraining 
needs of industry; developing part- 
nerships with basic education, and 
directing the development of institu- 



tional and System plans, including 
enrollment planning. 

Nelson, currently on leave from 
the academic vice presidency at 
California University of Pennsylva- 
nia, elected to return to that position 
before search procedures began. 
She has served as interim Vice 
Chancellor since July 1983. 

"The Board of Governors, Chan- 
cellor's Office, and the university 
presidents are excited about Dr. 
Hannah joining the team," says 
McCormick. 

"We are confident that she will 
continue to advance the System," he 
says. "Dr. Hannah has a solid under- 
standing of the academic enterprise. 
She appreciates quality, high stand- 
ards, and accountability." 




The FIXX, pictured above, is coming to the Clarion Stadium September 22. 
Ticltets are available in Riemer 104. Admission for the 7 p.m. concert is $7 
with I.D. See the Sept. 20 issue of the Call for details of the group. 



•Do you have a good knowledge of politics, cur- 
rent national and world events? 

•Do you have a comical or satirical wit? 

•And can you express yourself in editorial 
cartoons? 

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING 
ACCEPTED FOR A STAFF CARTOONIST 



Payment per accepted 
cartoon 



Pick up and return completed 
applications to 
aARION CALL OFFICE 

Roomi 

Harvey Hall 




Deadline for applications is Wed., Sept. 12 



Alumni Association to 
award Wscliolarsliips 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-3 



Ten $300 scholarships will be 
awarded this year to Clarion Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania students by 
the Clarion University Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Students must have completed one 
year at Clarion and are currently a 
full time student to be eligible for the 
scholarship. Application forms and 
further instructions may be obtained 
at the Alumni House on Wood Street. 

The Alumni Association is a pri- 
vate organization for the support of 



darion University through the or- 
ganization of special activities and 
publications for Clarion graduates 
and current students. 

Completed applications for the 
scholarships must be received at the 
Alumni House by Sept. 28. The 
Alumni Association Directors will 
make the final awards during its 
October board meeting. 

A review of the applicants will 
center on both their standing at the 
university and need. 



Holiday Inn Sponsors 
pedal, paddle and hoof 




Registration for the first "Petal, 
Paddle and Hoof Race" is going on 
right now. 

Proceeds from the race will 
benefit Children's Hospital in Pitts- 
burgh, and everyone 14 years and 
older is encouraged to participate. 

The race will begin at 10 a.m. on 
Sunday, Sept. 9 in the Clarion Holi- 
day Inn parking lot. In the first leg of 
the relay race, bicyclists will pedal 
from the Holiday Inn to Toby 
Bridge, then the second team 
member will paddle a canoe to 
Grady's cove, and finally, the third 
member will run back to the start- 
finish line at the Holiday Inn. 

The competition is broken down 
into various stages, with age brack- 
ets for both sexes. There is also a 



special category for individuals to 
compete in the tri-athalon, compet- 
ing in all three legs of the event 
alone. 

There will be free beverages and 
snacks for all participants, and win- 
ners in all team categories will earn 
trophies and gift certificates. The 
tri-athalon winner will receive a 
grand prize. 

Donations are $10 for individuals 
and $25 for teams. Company spon- 
sorship is encouraged. 

Registration may be made by 
calling 226-8682 or at the front desk 
of the Holiday Inn. 

The deadline for registration is 
Friday, Sept. 7. 



Students of Clarion University's Education Opportunities Program (EOP), a precollege experience, recently heard 
U.S. Representative William Clinger talk to their call on Campaign '84 and the election process. Pictured are EOP 
Director Terri White, Victoria Verni, Rep. Clinger dnd Derek Favers. 






WHEN YOU BUY^tfffBREAKFAST E^f^REE 




Choose from Egg McMUfflkf s%dwi&i, Hot Cakes and Sausage, 

or Scrambled Eggs, Sausage siid H^h Browns. WTien you do. 

vje'W give you a free chilled |jice of yoir choice. Limit one coupon 

per customer, per visit. Please |>resent coupon when ordering. 



Valid only at: 

MCDONALDS, 7th and Main Sts. 
Clarion, PA 




ExpiresOct. 15, 1984 




September 1984 
Calendar of Events 



SUN. 



MON 



TUES. 



WED. 




EVERY SUNDAY 
3 PM-8 PM 

AIIUCanEat 
DINNER BUFFET 

6.95 

includes Salad Bar & 

Dessert Bar 

Sanlor CItizant t 

Chll(lrinund«r12S.95 



IT'S BACK! 2 

THE GREATEST 
PABH 

DfTOWN 

Every Sunday 
$5.00 cover charge 

AIIUCan-Dnnk 
9p.m.-12a.m. 

(bar brands & dralt beer) 



GRAND < 

PARENIS 
DAY 

Bring the grandparenis 
to our Brunch Buffet 
10 a ni lo3p ni, and 
have an 8x10 Family 
Portrait taken lor 
only $8 IX). 

Includes Sitting lee by 
M/J Parker 



Every Sunday 16 
10a.m.-3p.m. 



5.25 



Senior Citizens & Children 

(7 10)4 25 

Children 6 and under 

FREE 



23 

AMERICAN 
NEWSAPER 

WEEK 

Sept 23-29 
Check inside for 

more details 

30 



MON.FRL 

HAPPY 

HOUR 

2 ten 

4 PM-7 PM 



NF.V\! 
Kvi'r> Mon. 
WKSIKKNMTi: 

\ori-stop 
(4}untr\ 6f Western 

Music 

2f-r 19:30 10 JO 

and 1 2:30. 1 JO 



COUNJRY ^^ 
WINE & 
BEER 
BASH 

>-Hff fREE fREt 
Wine and beei Irom 9 
'0 30 Comphmem^ ot 
National Record Ma : plus 
special surprises 



Every Monday 
5 PM 9 PM 

AH-UCaR-Eat 
UVER'N ONIONS 

Potato 01 vegetable 
and salad bar 



17 



4.95 



24 

WINE AND 
CHEESE 
PARTY 

7 to 8 p.m. 

Wine & Cheese 

compliments of 

Wayne Smith 

Beverage 



Lonely? 

DIAL 
226-4861 



Every Tuesday 

ITALIAN 

PASTA 

NIGHT 

(Jolorado Hrd preparrs 
KHncthin different 
each and every week 



WINE& 11 

CHEESE 
PARTY 
7 to 8 p.m. 

FREE- FREE FREE 

Wln« and Cheese 

compllmenta oi 

WWCH In Clarion 



EVERY 18 

TUESDA Y 

L(i.lri: VUtl: 

99' Cocktails 

9PM-12AM 

plus Music from the 
50 s 60 s, 4 70 s 



25 

DISCOVERY 
OF PACIFIC 

OCEAN 

PARTY 

Wear youf t}eachclothesl 
tnjoy 99' cockiaili 
from 9 p m midnight 
Try our Beacti Bomb 
}l 00 all nlielong 



Every Mon-Sat. 

2 EGGS 

(any style) 
toast & jelly 

99^ 



K\pr> 

Wednesday 
SOPHISIK ATKD 
l-ADIF-SMIK 

Keuturing: 

l.jidy III the Nite .\ward 

plus 2 ler I 

4PM :PM; 10PM I ^M 



12 



NA TIONAL 

SINGLES 

WEEK 

MIX AND MATCH 

PARTY 

Meet your oeiieci rnalO 
and gel set lot a specwi 
suipnse 



Every Wed 

BEER 

BATTER 

CHICKEN 

Potato or vegetable 
plut tullulad bai 
ONLY 

4.95 



19 



26 



Every 
Wednesday 

BUILD 
YOUR OWN 
TACOS 

FREE 

4p.m.-7p.m. 



THURS. 

Every Thursday 

STEAK 

BY THE OUNCE 

Fil«t 1.25 02. 

Strip 1.00 oz. 

Top Sirloin 7Soz 

Ch. StMk 50 oz. 

Inelud«( potato 
and Mlad bar 

This Sat. 6 

Sept. 8 

N.MIONAL 

NKIGHBORHOOD 

DAY 

Bring a neif(lihor in for 
Itiiich and reivihr a 
t'RK(. lunch h\ pu^cha^ 
ing one at equal or greater 
value. 

Every Thursday 1 3 
Neekefld 
Pre-celebratwn 

25' Drafts 
4p.m.-12a.m. 

and 2 fer 1 
4 PM-7 PM and 

9PM12AM 

Every Thursday 20 

BUILD 
YOUR OWN 
WEINIE 

FREE 
4 PM 7 PM 

Every 27 

Mon-Sat. 

2 EGGS 

(any style) 

2 Bacon or 
Sausages 

Toast and |elly 
I 99 



FRI. 



SAT. 



NEW 

EVERY SATURDAY 

V2 lb. 
KING CRAB LEGS 

with potato or 

vegetable 
plus salad bar 

$10.95 



mi 

FRIDAY 
MAPN£$S 

Ihtl 
liNrnti 

1 2 nUmMrtt 



Every Friday 1 4 

AllU-Can Eat 

BEER 

BATTER 

FISH 

includes potaic or 
vege'aaie pius saiad bs' 

4.95 



em 

FRIDAY 

smuB) 

SHRIMP 

Pttlj/nrem 
1.00pkte 



21 



Every Friday 



28 



4 PM-7 PM 

Plus Surprise 

Happy ' J Hours 

all nite long 



BIG SCREEN ' 

VIDEO 
MACHINE 
1 year 
ANNIV. PARTY 

• Colorado Red s 
famous spiked water- 
melon 

• Name that Video 

• Surprise Super Two 



'i'" 



.i^UNDIE 8 
PARTY 

Be sure to wear youi 
undies (but on the out- 
side) for some extra fun 
Plus a surprise 
(SUPER TWO! 
All those wearing 
their undlei on the out- 
aide drink 2 for 1 all 
nite long 



Colorado Red 1 5 

& Magic 96 

presents 
THE 3rd ANNUAL 
PAJAMA PARTY 

l-REE rRiE Fhfi: 
Champagne loasl at mid 
nignt compliments ot 
Magic 96 
^EAl^ yOURPJ s' 



1ST DAY OF 2 
AUTUMN 
FALLOUT 
PARTY 

All red. yellow and oi 
ange dunks half price 
tiom 9 PM Midnight 
plus a special 
SUPER TWO lometime 
tonite' 



HAPPY 

V4 YEAR 

PARTY 

Ring m the last quarter 
of 1984 wiitihats. bai 
loons, noise makers 
andFRlE fiot dogst. 
sauerkraut at mid 
nigtit Plus a special 
SUPtR two 



SN 



ZZ^iSSSSSZiSSCZSSSZZiSZ.'ZS^^SSSS:^^ 



4/ 



4~THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday. Sept. 6, 1984 

Educators give Reagan 
Low Marks 



As the campaign begins in 
earnest, President Ronald Reagan is 
not getting any higher marks from 
the nation's education comunity 
than he has during his last four 
years, various higher education ex- 



perts say. 

To assess the president's impact 
on colleges, College Press Service 
asked a cross section of officials and 
experts a variation of the same 
question President Reagan posed to 



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SEPT. 6, 6-9 P.M. ONLY 

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voters in 1980: Are you and your 
campus better off now than you were 
four years ago? 

Pointing to Reagan's attempts to 
gut federal financial aid programs, 
soft enforcement of campus civil 
rights laws, and a general "lack of 
interest" in higher education, some 
concluded Reagan has one of the 
worst higher education track 
records of any president in recent 
history. 

"We are certainly not better off 
than we were four years age," says 
Shawne Munrfiy, president of the 
National Coalition of Independent 
College and University Students 
(COPUS) and a student at St. Olaf 
College in Minnesota. 

"We've been fighting a continual 
uphill battle against the Reagan 
budget cuts," she laments. "He's 
tried to take a big chunk out of edu- 
cation for the last four years, but 
fortunately Congress has come up 
with compromises that didn't make 
the cuts as bad as they could have 
been." 

Indeed, during his first three 
years in office Reagan proposed 
cutting financial aid fundhig from 
30-to-50 percent, sending shock 
waves through the higher education 
community. 

Among other things, Reagan pro- 
posed eliminating some financial aid 
programs — student Social Security 
benefits. Supplemental Education 
Opportunity Grants (SEOG) and 
State Student Incentive Grants 
(SSIG) among them — and restrict- 
ing other programs. 

"It's been clear since the 1980-81 
school year that overall student aid 
has decreased by 20 percent, even 
with the rejection of Reagan's dras- 
tic proposed cuts," observes Kathy 
Ozer, legislative liaison for the Uni- 
ted States Student Association 
(USSA) in Washington, D.C. 

Drop- Add 

Drop/Add for the Fall Se- 
mester officially began on 
Thursday, Aug. 30 and will end 
on Tliursday, Sept. 6. 




Center Board presents "The Hanky Panky Burlesque Revue" featuring song, 
dance, comedy and beautiful dancing girls on Sept. 6 in M-B Auditorium at 
8:15 p.m. 

dinger Applauds 
Drinking Age Vote 



U.S. Rep. William F. Qinger, Jr. 
(R-PA) says that parents of teen- 
aged children all across America 
can breathe easier following pas- 
sage of a measure in the House of 
Representatives that would 
effectively encourage all 50 states to 
adopt a minimum drinking age of 21. 

"There are 25,000 alcohol-related 
deaths each year on our nation's 
highways, and tragically, 20 percent 
of these involve teenagers. Alcohol- 
related automobile accidents are the 
leading cause of death among teen- 
agers. More people die each year in 
this country as Uie result of alcohol 
than were killed during the first 
several years of the Vietnam War," 



said Clinger. 

The measure that passed the 
House would encourage all states to 
adopt a minimum drinking age of 21 
by withholding federal highway 
money from those states that do not 
choose to comply. 

The federal government would 
withhold 5 percent of a state's 
annual highway apportionment for 
fiscal year 1986 from states which do 
not adopt the higher drinking age, 
and 10 percent of the apportionment 
in fiscal year 1987 if the state still 
fails to comply. The finds withheld 
would be returned to the state when 
they raise their minimum drinking 
age to 21. 



FULLINGTON TRAILWAYS and 

THE DEPOT 

WELCOME STUDENTS BACK 




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DEPOT 



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340 MAIN ST. Clarion, PA 
814-226-4534 



¥ 



Schedule Effective 
9-5-84 



DAILY SERVICE SCHEDULE: 

•To DuBois, Pittsburgh, State College, 
Williamsport, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, 
New York City and all connecting points. 
Leaving at 12:45 P.M. 

•To Oil City, Mercer-Erie, Sharon, Youngs- 
town, Ohio, Cleveland, Ohio, and all 
connecting points. 
Leaving at 2:10 p.m. 

SPECIAL FRIDAY SERVICE 
SCHEDULE: 

•To DuBois, Pittsburgh, Buffalo, N.Y., 
State College, and all connecting points. 
Leaving at 6:10 p.m. 



Commerce 
News 

Pennsylvania ranks eighth among 
the 50 states in manufactured ex- 
ports and fourth in total employment 
related to manufactured exports, 
the U.S. Department of Commerce 
reports in its international trade 
magazine. 

BUSINESS AMERICA says in its 
August 6 issue that Pennsylvania 
manufactured exports totaled $8.1 
billion, representing 4.9 percent of 
the U.S. total in 1981, the largest 
year for which statistics are avail- 
able. The state's total employment 
related to manufactured exports 
amounted to 284,100 jobs, fourth 
largest among the states. 

Pennsylvania ranks first in export 
of primary metals and sixth in elec- 
tric equipment, according to the 
magazine. Between 1977 and 1981, 
manufactured exports grew 72 per- 
cent, while the state's production in- 
creased only 44 percent. 

Academy 

Applications 

Available 

Those 23rd District citizens, ages 
17-21, interested in attending a mili- 
tary academy beginning in 1985 
should contact Congressman Bill 
dinger's State College office for an 
application. 

Clinger stressed that entrance re- 
quirements into the Air Force, Mil- 
itary, Naval, and Merchant Marine 
Academies are stringent and all 
graduates of the academies are re- 
quired to serve for five years in their 
selected branch of the military. 

"We've found that students with 
strong academic records who also 
excel in athletics and other extra- 
curricular activities have the best 
chance of gaining admittance into 
the academies," Clinger said. 

While members of Congress are 
responsible for nominating 
candidates to the academies, to en- 
sure fairness in reviewing appli- 
cants, Clinger has appointed an 
Academy Advisory Board to direct 
the process. 

All applicants are considered by 
the Congressman for nomination 
only. The academies then evaluate 
the nominated students, and they 
solely make the appointments. 

Out of the 55 students Congress- 
man Qinger nominated this year, 19 
were accepted by the various ser- 
vice academies. 

The deadline for completed appU- 
cations is Oct. 31, 1984, but because 
of the lengthy process involved, in- 
terested parties should contact 
dinger's State College office soon, 
llie address is: 315 South Allen 
Street, Suite 219, SUte College, PA 
16801; telephone: (814) 238-1776. 

Hiose interested in the U.S. Coast 
Guard Academy should write: 
Director of Admissions, U.S. Coast 
Guard Academy, New London, CT 
06320. Admission to the Coast Guard 
Academy is on the basis of a na- 
tionwide competition. No nomination 
is required for entry into the U.S. 
Coast Guard Academy. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa, Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-5 




A cat uses its whisken to 
determine if a space is too 
small to squeeze through. 



Job money mishandled 



state Rep. Bill Wachob said that 
the recent Government Accounting 
Office Report on the distribution of 
the five billion dollars for emer- 
gency jobs contains clear evidence 
of massive federal neglect of the 
areas hardest hit by unemployment, 
namely Pennsylvania and most of 
the other states in the northeast and 
midwest. 

Pennsylvania, whose 13 percent 
unemployoment was among the 
highest in the country in April 1983, 
when the jobs money was appropria- 
ted, ranked 44th in assistance for 



unemployed residents with an aver- 
age benefit of $355 for each unem- 
ployed person. West Virginia, whose 
19 percent unemployment was the 
highest in the nation, ranked even 
worse, 47th; the average benefit for 
each unemployed person was $337. 
Ranked last was Ohio, with 12.8 per- 
cent unemployment, with a benefit 
of $299 for each unemployed person. 
Alaska, with 11.4 percent unem- 
ployed, received the most funds for 
each unemployed person, $1,968. 
Ranked second and third were South 
Dakota and North Dakota with 6.1 



percent and 6.6 percent unemploy- 
ment respectively. South Dakota 
received $1,519 for each unemployed 
person, and North Dakota, $1,295. 

Rep. Wachob said, "What is par- 
ticularly disturbing is that these 
figures reflect the targeting of a 
portion of the funds to high unem- 
ployoment states. 

Rep. Wachob said, "This situation 
clearly underscores the need for 
aggressive leadership in Congress to 
implement the kinds of programs I 
have been proposing to provide long 
term solutions to the problem of 



structural unemployment, namely 
(1) creating a National Develop- 
ment Corporation to provide capital 
to revitalize the nation's industrial 
base and develop new technologies 
for the future; (2) amending the tax 
code in favor of businesses which 
educate and train employees; (3) 
providing unemployed workers with 
job training vouchers which the par- 
ticipating employer can cash in; and 
(4) drastically reducing the budgets 
of inefficient, ineffective, and unnec- 
essary domestic and military pro- 
grams." 




Get down to business fester. 

MththeM-35. 



If there's one thing business 
students have always needed, 
this is it: an affordable, busi- 
ness-oriented calculator. 
The Texas Instruments 
BA-35, the Student Business 
Analyst. 

Its built-in business 
formulas let you perform 
complicated finance, 
accounting and statistical 
functions - the ones that 
usually require a lot of time 
and a stack of reference books, 
like present and future value 



calculations, amortizations 
and balloon payments. 

The BA-35 means you 
spend less time calculating, 
and more time learning. One 
keystroke takes the place 
of many. 

The calculator is just part 
of the package. You also get 
a book that follows most 
business courses: the Business 
Analyst Guidebook. Business 
professors helped us write it, 
to help you get the most out 
of calculator and classroom. 



A powerful combination 
Think business. With 
the BA-35 Student 
Business Analyst. 



^ 



Texas 
Instruments 

Creating useful products 
and services for you. 



1983 Texat Iratnimena 



6-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



Retention program meets many needs 



Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania has developed a university- 
wide retention program, including 
an emphasis on black student reten- 
tion, to meet the many needs of stu- 
dents at Clarion. 

The University Rentention Plan is 
housed within the Division of Aca- 
demic Affairs, directed by Dr. Rob- 
ert V. Edington, provost and 
academic vice president. Edington 
has extensive experience in reten- 
tion and provides the critical direc- 
tion and support necessary for the 
success of the program. 

Dr. Francine G. McNairy, dean of 
academic support services and as- 
sistant to the academic vice presi- 
dent, is the administrator with the 
major responsibility for the design 
and implementation of the retention 
program. 

In recognition of February as 
Black History Month, the University 
has announced one of the major 
components of the university reten- 
tion plan, the minority curriculum 
development program. Patricia 
Payne, an assistant professor of li- 
brary science, has been authorized 
for a partial reassignment to coor- 
dinate the minority curriculum de- 
velopment program by President 
Thomas A. Bond, supporting the uni- 
versity's committment to 
versity's committment to affirma- 
tive action. 

The history of the university's 
work with affirmative action dates 
back to the early 1970's. In March 
1973, the institution received an In- 
novative Program Grant from the 
Pennsylvania Department of Educa- 
tion for the development of a Human 
Relations Center. 

"The purpose of that grant was to 
plan, design, implement, and evalu- 
ate a program to develop positive 
human and racial relationships at 
Clarion University and within the 
Clarion community," explains 
McNairy. "Due to the various social 
and ethnic backgrounds, values, and 
complexions among student, facul- 
ty, and administrators at the 
University, the administration felt 



that it was necessary to first identify 
the problems and concerns that 
existed because of these 
differences." 

In 1973, the University administra- 
tion contracted with the Developers 
of Intergroup Interaction 
Techniques, Inc. (DIGIT) from Pitts- 
burgh to conduct a Human Relations 
Organizational Audit in order to 
produce an Administrative Action 
Plan which programmatically ad- 
dressed the concerns identified in 
the audit. 

While some components of the 1973 
Administrative Action Plan were 
achieved, the institutionalization of 
programs addressing multi-cultural 
curriculum and black student re- 
tention are finally achieving imple- 
mentation under the current admin- 
istration," says McNairy. "The Uni- 
versity has taken the position that 
we live in a multi-cultural world 
which must be reflected in our 
curricula. The impetus for such a 
program is consistent with the Uni- 
versity's mission to provide an intel- 
lectual and social climate conducive 
to the fullest development of stu- 
dents." 

The Minority Curriculum Devel- 
opment Program's primary 



objective is to oihance the academic 
environment so that all students, 
faculty, administrators, and staff 
become more knowledgeable and 
sensitive to the cultural, academic, 
political and economic aspects of 
Afro- Americans. "The program is 
an academically sound institutional 
effort to infuse the black experience 
into the existing curriculum," con- 
tinues McNairy. 

Sixteen academic departments 
have been identified which can ap- 
propriately infuse the black exper- 
ience. Each year at least four of 
them will receive assistance in the 
infusion process by the Coordinator 
of Minority Curriculum Develop- 
ment or a consultant. "This assist- 
ance has resulted in the identifica- 
tion of appropriate courses for infu- 
sion and subsequently the develop- 
ment of bibliographies, and specific 
articles and monographs," says 
McNairy. "To date, the following 
academic departments are involved 
in the infusion process: Administra- 
tive Science, Education, History, the 
Sociology/Social work component of 
APPS, Special Education and 
Speech, Communication and Thea- 
tre." 

llie cooperation of college deans. 



Financial support 
for libraries debated 



The House Appropriations Sub- 
committee on Interior in Washing- 
ton, D.C., recently heard testimony 
from Bernard Vavrek, professor of 
library science and coordinator for 
the Center for the Study of Rural 
Librarianship at Clarion University. 

Vavrek's testimony addressed leg- 
islation dealing with financial sup- 
port of library services by the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Humani- 
ties. 

"For both students and observers 
of the public library movement, it 
comes as a considerable surprise to 
learn that 82 percent of the public 
libraries in the United States are lo- 



cated in communities of 25,000 or 
fewer individuals," he stated. 
"Instead of a withdraw! of support 
and reduction of funds, this witness 
would suggest that a new, vigorous 
effort be made to involve public li- 
braries at all levels of the Endow- 
ment's activities." 

Joining Vavrek as witnesses were 
Robert Wedgeworth, executive di 
rector of the American Library As- 
sociation, Chicago, and Dr. Chin- 
chin Chen, associate dean of the 
graduate school of library and infor- 
mation science, Simmons College, 
Boston. 



department chairpersons, and fac- 
ulty is the keystone to the success of 
this program, according to McNairy. 
However, their utilization of the 
technical assistance provided by the 
coordinator of minority curriculum 
development or a consultant such as 
DIGIT, Inc., as well as resource doc- 
uments, is of equal importance. 

"The university administration 
firmly believes that the Minority 
Curriculum Development Program 
is an essential ingredient of the uni- 
versity-wide Retention Program 
and furthermore, is a model for the 
State System of Higher Education," 
adds McNairy. 

Local businesses 
get into exports 

The Economic Development Ad- 
ministration — a branch of the U.S. 
Department of Commerce — is plan- 
ning to award $35,000 to the North- 
west Pennsylvania Regional 
Planning and Development 
Commission to assist local bus- 
inesses in selling products overseas, 
according to U.S. Rep. William F. 
dinger, Jr., (R-PA) 

The money would be used to edu- 
cate and provide technical research 
assistance to owners and managers 
of businesses and industry in the 
northwest Pennsylvania region who 
wish to sell their products in the 
foreign export markets. 

Ttie program will provide these 
businesses and industries with the 
necessary in-house skills to submit 
bids and secure exporting contracts. 

"One in every six jobs in the 
United StatiBS is dependent on 
exports and I see this program as a 
potential growth area that can gen- 
erate new jobs in a region that has 
experienced a higher rate of unem- 
ployment than the nation as a 
whole," said Clinger. 

Clinger said the program would 
also help reduce our international 
trade deficit as assisting businesses 
in exporting goods and services 
overseas. 



Homecoming 
previewed 

Homecoming and Autumn Leaf 
are two events which are synomous 
with each other. This year's Home- 
coming Day is Saturday, Oct. 13. 
The building of floats by various 
campus organizations for Uie parade 
will aid student participation in the 
event. 

The theme for this year's parade 
is "Autumn Art Spectacular". An or- 
ganizational meeting has been 
arranged for Thursday, Sept. 6 at 5 
p.m. m 126 Riemer Coiter. This 
meeting is for any organizations that 
are inter^ted in building a float for 
the ALF Parade. Applications will 
be distributed at this meeting. Appli- 
cations that are not returned by the 
deadline of Friday, Sept. 28, will not 
be considered by the Special Events 
Committee of Center Board. There 
will be prizes awarded and rebates 
given to those organizations who 
build floats for the parade. 

House votes 
for clean water 

The House of Representatives 
voted on June 26, 1964 by a 405 to 11 
margin, to extend and strengthen 
major provisions of the Clean Water 
Act. 

The 1984 Water Quality Renewal 
Act, reported out of Rep. dinger's 
Public Works and Transportation 
Committee in May, authorizes 
funding for several new program in- 
itiatives, extends for five years a 
number of expired programs, and 
increases funding for the construc- 
tion grants program. 

"This legislation represents a 
strong and innovative approach 
toward providing the American 
people with the most effective dean 
Water Act possible," said dinger. 

The bill increases the current 
authorization for grants to assist in 
the construction of sewage treat- 
meai works from its present level of 
$2.4 billion to $2.9 billion for the 1985 
fiscal year, and $3.4 billion for each 
of the three next fiscal years. 



fS Tana Shear Welco mes CUP Student s 



Students can recerve 

10% discount w/ID 

on all hair services 

*ear piercing and tanning booth not included. 



Walk-ins Welcome 



HOURS: 

Moil.-Fri. 9 a.m. -9 p.m. 
Sat. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
Phone: 226-8951 
Located in the 

800 Center 





TANA SHEAR TOP STYLISTS ARE: 

DARLYNE, DEBBIE, PAM, JESSIE, MARY, KATHY, RITA, CATHY. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-7 



i ' 



Wachob Backs Arms Control 



A candidate for U.S. Congress in 
the 23rd District, Rep. Wachob said 
that the Reagan Administration has 
shown no serious interest in arms 
control. He added, "In its attempt to 
close the so-called 'window of vul- 
nerability,' it has in fact opened the 
door to destabilization by promoting 
wasteful, high-risk weapons 
systems." 

Rep. Wachob said that the United 
l^tes could demonstrate courage 



and constructive leadership by 
talcing the first step toward reopen- 
ing arms negotiations with the 
Soviet Union. "A willingness to 
negotiate would signal moral 
strength," Wachob said, "not 
weakness or capitulation to the Sov- 
iets," who, he noted, have an equal 
interest in the issue of arms control. 
"There's little doubt that the 
Soviet system of government, its 
values, and ideologies are vastly dif- 



Younger Scholars 
applications available 



Guidelines and application forms 
for the Younger Scholars Program 
of the National Endowment for the 
Humanities are now available for 
photocopying in the Placement 
Office. The Program will award up 
to 100 grants nationally to students 
under 21 years of age to conduct 
their own research and writing pro- 
jects in such fields as history, 
philosophy, and the study of 
Uterature. Applicants must be under 
21 years.of age throughout the entire 
calendar year in which the applica- 
tion is submitted. They may not 
have received a bachelor's degree, 



or expect to receive one, within two 
months of the completion of a 
Younger Scholars grant. The appli- 
cation deadline is Oct. 15, 1984. 

Recipients of the^ awards will 
receive a stipend of $1,800 and be 
expected to work full time for nine 
weeks during the summer of 1985, 
researching and writing a humani- 
ties paper under the close supervi- 
sion of a humanities scholar. Please 
note that this is not a financial aid 
program and that no academic 
credit should be sought for these 
projects. 



College costs up 6% 



The total cost of attending college 
this school year will increase only 
six percent over last year, a new 
report by the College Board con- 
cludes. 

Over the last few years, says 
College Board President George 
Hanford, college costs have in- 
creased 10-to-ll percent a year as 
colleges boosted tuition to keep pace 
with high interest rates and infla- 
tion. 

The comparatively small increase 
in this year's college costs marks 
what many experts hope is an end to 
the double-digit cost increases of the 
last several years. 

At public schools, moreover, the 
increase amounts to only a five 
percent rise over last year, making 
the total cost $4881 for four-year 
resident students, and $3998 for stu- 
dents at two-year schools. 

Private school students aren't 



faring quite as well. Costs of at- 
tending private colleges are up 
seven percent over last year, for a 
total cost of $9022 at four-year 
schools and $7064 at two-year insti- 
tutions, the study of over 3000 
schools nationwide reveals. 

Total college costs in the survey 
include tuition and fees, books and 
supplies, room and board, personal 
expenses, and transportation. 

While total costs will rise only six 
percent this year, however, the 
study also shows that tuition and 
fees will increase eight-to-nine per- 
cent at both public and private 
schools. 

Students at four-year public 
schools, for example, will pay aver- 
age tuition and fees of $1126, while 
their counterparts at private 
colleges will pay an average of 
$5016. 



Vanlandingham New Dean 



Dr. Marguerite VanLandingham, 
a Clarion University professor of fi- 
nance who has been serving as in- 
terim dean of Clarion's College of 
Business Administration since Aug. 
15, 1983, has been named dean of the 
College of Business Administration 
and Dr. Edward Grejda, a professor 
of English, has been appointed act- 
ing dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Dr. Robert Edington, provost and 
academic vice president, announced 
the appointments at the annual 
spring meeting of the Clarion Uni- 
versity faculty. 

VanLandingham was appointed 
interim dean following the resigna- 
tion of Dr. Robert Fleck to accept a 
position as vice chancellor for aca- 
demic affairs at the University of 
Houston at Victoria. 

A native of Evanston, 111., 
VanLandingham has taught at 
Clarion since 1981. Prior to cmaiag 



ferent from those of the United 
States," Wachob said; "but in 
another important respect, the two 
nations are identical — both set a 
high premium on survival." 

Rep. Wachob said that growing 
nuclear stockpiles and shrinking 
warning times for sophisticated 
weapons had combined to bring the 
superpowers to the brink of a 
nuclear disaster. "Today's weapons 
pose an unprecedented threat to the 



to Clarion, she ^as president of V&V 
Associates, a private consulting 
firm, from 1979-81. Previous 
academic experience includes 
positions as assistant professor at 
Pennsylvania State University from 
1975-79 and assistant professor at 
Loyola University in New Orleans 
from 1972-74. She also served as an 
acting dean at Loyola from 1974-75. 

Grejda, a 1957 graduate of Qarion 
University, earned his Ph.D. from 
the University of Pittsburgh in 1969. 
A member of the Clarion English 
Department since 1961, Grejda serv- 
ed as department chairman from 
1971-79. Grejda was also honored in 
1980 with a one-year senior Ful- 
bright lecturer to the University of 
Peking in the People's Republic of 
China. He was leader of a four-per- 
son team that taught American lit- 
erature in China for the first time 
since the revolution in 1949. 



survival of our species," Wachob 
said. '"The only way to remove that 
threat is by removing the weapons." 
Rep. Wachob said that currently, 
the United States has about 9,000 
strategic nuclear warheads 
compared to 7,000 for the Soviets, 
while in tactical nuclear warheads, 
the United States has a lead of 20,000 
to 14,000, according to Department 
of Defense figures. 



Rep. Wachob said, "In terms of 
destructive power, the United States 
can destroy every Soviet city 35 
times over, while the Soviet Union 
can wipe out all our cities 28 times 
over. Is that supposed to make us 
feel safe?" 

Rep. Wachob repeated his past 
call for a bi-lateral, mutually veri- 
fiable nuclear freeze between the 
two superpowers. 



QUADCO 

The QUADCO Concert Association 
as in previous years, is offering free 
admittance to all QUADCO events 
with I.D. All others withing to at- 
tend must have a QUADCO member- 
ship (season membership) to attend. 

The first concert of the 1984-85 sea- 
son is Lois Edwards, soprano who ac- 
companies herself on various harps. 
This concert is scheduled for Sunday, 
Sept. 9 at 3 p.m. in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. 



Aebersold appointed 
as interim president 



NEWS 

TIP? 

Call 2380 



The Board of Governors for the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) approved the appointment 
of Robert N. Aebersold as interim 
president of Slippery Rock Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania at the May 15 
public meeting. James H. McCor- 
mick. System Chancellor, made a 
joint announcement of the Board 
action with Slippery Rock Council of 
Trustees Chair, Jack R. Arthurs. 

Aebersold, 47, succeeds Herb F. 
Reinhard, president of the 
University since 1979. Dr. Reinhard 
has resigned to assume the presi- 
dency of Morehead State University 
(Kentucky) . 

According to Chancellor McCor- 
mick, the interim appointment was 
effective July 1 to "such time as the 
Board appoints a permanent presi- 



dent for the University." The 
interim president will have a salary 
equal to that of the other System 
presidents ($55,000). 

Dr. Aebersold has served as Vice 
President for Academic Affairs at 
Slippery Rock since 1980; from 1978 
to 1980, he was acting Vice President 
for Academic Affairs. Between 1968 
and 1978, Dr. Aebersold was first an 
associate, then assistant and full 
professor in the Slippery Rock De- 
partment of Physical Education. He 
chaired the Physical Education De- 
partment from 1972 to 1978. 

Aebersold held previous teaching 
and administrative posts at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Hanover Col- 
lege (IN), and in the Oberlin Ohio 
City Schools. 



THE whopper: DELICIOUS ALL WAYS. 





Students . . . Pick up discount 

cards at Burger King 

Rt. 68 and 1-80 in Clarion 

Please present this'coupon before ordering. Limit one coupon 
per customer. Not to be used with other coupons or offers. Void 
where prohibited by law. 
Good only at: Rt. 68 & l-ao, Clarion 




Buy 2 Whoppers for 

$1.99 




Please present this coupon before ordering. Limit one coupon 

per customer. Not to be used with other coupons or offers. Void 

where prohibited by law. 

Goodonlyat: Rt. 68 M-80, Clarion Expires: Sept. 25, 1984 



8— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



WELCOME BACK 

CUP 

ic 35 Money Saving Coupons in this 
paper for dollar stretching on 
Clarion's Main Street. 

^ Big Prizes for Activities Day. 
Register to win at participating Main 
Street stores now through Sept. 15. 
Drawings on Campus Sept. 16. 

^ Co-sponsoring mini-concert with 
Center Board featuring ''SAUD" on 
Activities Day, Sept. 16. 




Creative Clarion students tal<e third 



Clarion award winners (from left to right): Ms. Marini Berg, Bill Mushrush, Mary 
Salvamoser, Betsy Schellen and Jennifer Unson pose with contest official. 

Photo Courtesy of Ms. Marini 



[iJi^p. The Clarion Clipper 

I N ft R P TflW E^'* 9' I*®® & S. 5th Ave. 

jSSrTTOTPO invites All Students to 

liLlrrL& enjoy breakfast anytime, 
a variety of sandwiches, steaks, seafood and 
salads. 

...Also Enjoy your favorite cocktail at 
The Gaslight Saloon 



students from Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania were honored in 
New York City as third place 
winners of the 15th Annual Market- 
ing/Communications Competition in 
the graduate division. A group of 
students from Ms. Marini's Media in 
Advertising course joined the other 
winners on June 14-15 as guests of 
Philip Morris in New York City. 
During the two days, the six winning 
teams presented their proposals to 
top executives and brand managers 
at the Philip Morris World Head- 
quarters. The six winning teams 
were then presented with presenta- 
tions by Philip Morris and ad agency 
account executives on marketing 
and advertising strategies of several 
Philip Morris brands. 

Qarion's project was one of 143 en- 
tries made from colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the country. 
The project consisted of a business- 
to-business marketing proposal and 
advertising campaign for Wisconsin 
Tissue Mills, Inc., makers of top 
quality towel, tissue, and table top 
paper products. 

Members of the Clarion team were 
Kevin Berg, Kevin Browne, Kristine 
Kreger, Lainey Moore, Bill 
Mushrush, Mary Salvamoser, Betsy 
Schelien, and Jennifer Vinson. 

Winners of the first and second 



APOLLODORUS MUSIC 

$25 Gift Certificate 
BOOK NOOK 

$10 Gift Certificate 
COUNTY SEAT 

UPPERS & DOWNERS 

$20 Gift Certificate 
TANA SHEAR 
DORIAN SHOP 

2 -$10 Gift Certificates 
G.C. MURPHY COMPANY 
CROOKS CLOTHING 

$20 Gift Certificate 
WEIN'S 

$20 GIFT CERTIFICATE 
DITZ'S 

JAMES JEWELERS 
DON MILLER SHOES 

SPACE'S SERVISTAR HARDWARE 

$10 Gift Certificate 
MCDONALD'S 
Gift Certificate 



KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN 

Gift Certificate 

TOWN & COUNTRY CLEANERS 

Gift Certificate 

BROWN'S BOOT SHOP 
CHILDREN'S SHOP 

Gift Certificate 
WDI OFFICE SUPPLY 

$10 GIFT CERTIFICATE 



CARDTOWNE 

Enameled Hallmark Pen 

HAWK ELECTRONICS 

AKG Headphones 
WESTERN SHED 
PAUL A. WEAVER JEWELERS 
SHEAR SHED 
COKE'S CUTTERS 

2 Free Cuts -$23 Value 



OFFICIAL ENTRY BLANK 

MAIN STREET MERCHANTS ASSOCIATION 

Activities Day Drawing 

(fill out and drop in box) 



NAME 



ADDRESS 
PHONE _ 



CUP ID NUMBER 



GUYS & DOLLS HAIR STYLING 

2 Free Cuts -$23 Value 

NEW CREATIONS PHOTOGRAPHY 
AUTUMN LEAF 

$15 Gift Certificate 
COLLEQIOS 
FOX'S PIZZA DEN 

Large Pizza 

KLINGENSMITH'S DRUG STORE 

Case of Pop 

WILSHIRE'S 

One Dozen Roses 
KNOT & PLANT 
WENDY'S 
WMKX 

2 -$10 Gift Certificates to 

Apollodorus Music 

SMITTY'S GOLDEN DAWN 

Gift Certificate Good 
on all Grocery Items 

McNUTT JEWELERS 
TREE HOUSE 

$20 Gift Certificate 




OnJostensGold 




I 




See your Jostens representative. 

Date: Sept. 6, 7, 1984 Time: 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
Place : Univer sity Book Center 



VISA' 



MOilM'CQra. 



<" 1984 Mem IfK. 



Payment plans available. 



place awards in the graduate cate- 
gory were the University of Houston 
and Willamette University. 

The winning entries were chosen 
by a distinguished panel of judges, 
including Louis T. Hagopian, Chair- 
man, N W AVER ABH Internation- 
al; Mary Wells Lawrence, Chair- 
man, Wells, Rich, Greene; William 
Ruder, President, William Ruder 
Incorporated; Dr. John C. Burton, • 
Dean, Graduate School of Business, 
Columbia University; John T. Lna- 
dry. Senior Vice President and Di- 
rector of Marketing; James C. Bowl- 
ing, Senior Vice President and 
Director of Corporate Affairs, Philip 
Morris Incorporated, and John A. 
Murphy. 

Entrants were invited to develop 
projects related to Philip Morris 
programs or its non-tobacco pro- 
ducts. 

Philip Morris Incorporated 



includes Philip Morris USA, whose 
major brands are Marlboro, Benson 
& Hedges lOO's, Merit, Virginia 
Slims, Parliament Lights and 
Players; Philip Morris Internation- 
al, which manufactures and 
markets a variety of cigarette 
brands through affiliates, licensees, 
and export sales organizations, and 
manages Seven-Up International's 
operations; Miller Brewing Com- 
pany, brewer of Miller High Life, 
Lite, Lowenbrau, Meister Brau, 
Magnum, and Milwaukee's Best; 
The Seven-Up Company, producer of 
7-UP, Diet 7-UP, LIKE Cola, and 
Sugar Free LIKE Cola in the United 
States, Canada and Puerto Rico; 
Philip Morris Industrial, which 
makes tissues, specialty papers, and 
packaging materials, and Mission 
Viejo Realty Group, Inc., a com- 
munity development company in 
southern Colorado. 



Chandler Menu 



THURSDAY, SEPT. 6 

LUNCH: Cream of Barley Soup, Beef Broth, Hot Dog on Roll with Chili Sauce on Side, Hot Meat 
Loaf Sandwich with Gravy, Shredded Hash Brown Potatoes. 

DINNER: Cream of Barley Soup, Beef Broth, Fried Chicken, Stuffed Cabbage PloUs, Carrots, 
Brussel Sprouts, Potatoes. 
FRIDAV.SEPT. 7 

BREAKFAST: Ham & Cheese Omelette, Bacon, Hot Sticky Buns, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, 
Grilled Ham, Raisin Muffin, Fried Potatoes. 

LUNCH: New England Clam Chowder, Chicken Noodle Soup, Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato on Toast, 
Pizza, Potato Chips, Mixed Vegetables. 

DINNER: New England Clam Chowder, Chicken Noodle Soup, Baked Fillet Haddock, Grilled 
Chopped Sirloin Steak, Com, French Fries, Collard Greens. 
SATURDAY. SEPT. 8 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Fried Potatoes, Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Banana Bread. 
LUNCH: Chicken Rice Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Sloppy Joe on Bun, Egg Salad Sandwich, O'Brien 
Pot3to€s Cd 111 i flower 

DFINNER: Chicken Rice Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Chicken Cutlet, Stuffed Shells, Cabbage, Po- 
tatoes, Squash. 
SUNDAY. SEPT. 9 

BRUNCH: Chicken Ala King on Biscuit, Smoked Sausage Links, Fried Eggs, Bagel w/Cream 
Cheese, French Toast w/Syrup, Bacon, Home Fried Potatoes, Cinnamon Rolls. 
DINNER: Cappelletti Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Roast Leg of Lamb, Batter Fried Fish, Corn, 
Potatoes, Green Beans. 
MONDAY, SEPT. 10 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Farina, Cinnamon Rolls, Fried Potatoes, French Toast w/Hot 
Syrup, Coffee Crumb Cake. 

LUNCH: Chili Soup, Cream of Potato Soup, Italian Steak Sandwich, Cheese Omelette, Tater-Tots, 
Hot Cinnamon Apple. 

DINNER: Chili Soup, Cream of Potato Soup, Roast Pork w/Gravy, Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, 
Peas, Sweet Potatoes, Beets. 
TUESDAY, SEPT. U 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Smoked Bacon Slices, Cream of Rice, Peadi Muffins, Fried 
Potatoes, Cherry Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, Sausage Patty, Caramel Rolls. 
LUNCH: Cream of Chicken Soup, Tomato Macaroni Soup, Pizza, Country Style Ham and Cab- 
bage, Potato Dumplings, Beans. 

DINNER: Cream of Chicken Soup, Tomato Macaroni Soup, Roast Chicken Eighths, Beef Stew, 
Mashed Potatoes w/Gravy, Carrots. 
WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 12 

BREAKFAST; Fried Eggs - Sunnyside or Over, English Muffin, Fried Potatoes, Chilled Pear 
Halves, Buttermilk Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Date Nut Bread. 

LUNCH: Homemade Beef Noodle Soup, Chicken Broth, Cheese Dog on Roll with Onions and 
Relish, Chicken Chow Mein w/Crisp Noodles, Doritos, Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef Noodle Soup, Chicken Broth, Baked Pork Chop w/Stuffing Cap and 
Gravy, Swedish Meat Balls, Apple Sauce, Rice, Asparagus. 



The Clarion Mall Associates 

wish all Students 
the Best of Luck 
this Semester 
Come and see us.... 
we 're in the 
CLARION MALL 





PIZZA PUB 

1306 E. MAIN STREET IN CLARION 

ALL STUDENTS GET $1.00 OFF 
A LARGE PIZZA 



HOURS: 



Mon.-Thurs.: 1 1 a.m. • midnight 
Fri. & Sat.: 1 1 a.m. • 1 a.m. 
Sun.: Noon-Midnight 
Coupon good thru 9/13/84 




10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-11 



MERCHANTS WELCOME CLARION STUDENTS 




DITZ'S 

624 Main Street 

on all purchases 



HHO/ ^4t onaiipuruiid 

lU /O OTT with coupon 



Welcome Back Students 



Expires Sept. 30, 1984 




enter 

226-8281 




i tfELCOME BAC K 

nU Autumn .diof 

goo es'His^ 

2S6-g370 
7fe6*.-9u.9-5 Sai.fO-5 

^ 



"^^m^Wi 



WELCOME 




50^ OFF 

ALL REGULARLY PRICED POSTERS 

WITH COUPON 

The Autumn Leaf 

800 CENTER 

Mon. ^ Fri. 9-5 226-8370 Sat. 1 0-5 

1/^ Expires \^' 
\ 9/13/ 84 r^ 





\ tfELCOME BAC R 

STUDENTS 



5% OFF 

on all purchases 

HAWK ELECTRONICS 

MAIN STREET, CLARION 



I 




- ^LCOME BA^ _^ 
$2.00 OFF "^^*S $2.00 OFF 

V^.wv wi ■ MAIN ST., CLARION ^•""^^ ^* 

On any purchase of men's, women's, juniors, 

children's clothing, shoes, art & needlework 

$8.00 -$17.99 

May not be applied to lay-aways or existing charge balances 
■EXPIRES SEPT. 30, 1984s 



4^1 



-WELCOME BACK CUP- 

We Missed You 

USE THIS COUPON TO RECEIVE 
$5.00 OFF 

any regularly priced item of 
$20.00 or more 

^the ^ of Crooks Clothing 

tree house 



Offer Expires Sept. 30, 1984 



^'^^rT7^?}/n2:^^ 



i^^m^WK 



j gELCOME BAm 

'eieMtc Sac4 ^ 1i P Stct4e*aJ 

We have all your shopping needs at 

lolden 



^^HCiUf 



22 N. Sixth Avenue 
Clarion, PA 10214 




^ gELCOME BACT ^ 

SloOOFF 3!lfcSSL $5.00 OFF 

On any purchase of men's, women's, juniors, 
children's clothing, shoes, art & needlework 

$18.00 and up 






^^frmf/ifatb!Z. 



May not be applied to lay-aways or existing charge balances 
EXPIRES: SEPT. 30, 1984 



I^QSZZBtaa 



WELCOME BACK 
CUP STUDENTS 



QBD DDDBBQ 

OAlMM-iMitt. MaTY-CMtwtt dWT#\T^O 

15% off entire Stock of 
regular priced merchandise 



\l gELCOME 




^iTSooFF ^dn's 



$1.00 OFF 

MAIN ST., CLARION 

On any purchase of men's, women's, juniors, 
children's clothing, shoes, art & needlework 

$5.00-$7.99 

May not be applied to lay-aways or existin g charge balances 
._^^^^^^^^PIRES SEPT. 30, 1984^^^^^^^ 



Come see the largest selection of men's, women's, children's 
J* jSi 1 1 boots, shoots, athletic footwear in Clarion County 

■■■ ■■■ iH^ m^ ^^ a^ H^ iHM ■■■ ■■■ ■■■ ■■■ ■■■ "i^ a^B h^ ^bb ■ 

— — gELCOME BA^ 

Town & Country Cleaners 

508 Main Street 

10% off with this coupon 




ZtrrtTiTTTZtfa 



\ 



I 



WELCOME_BACK 

^^LCOMEBACKCUr 
^^on ai? ''^ 14 K. Gold Chains & Bracelets 

with this coupon until 9/15/84 

JAMES JEWELERS 

Downtown Clarion 

..Not Valid with previous purchases or with o ther coupons 



WELCOMEBACK 



^\^^ 

<::-^' 



$5.00 OFF 

all hosiery 

Offer Expires Sept. 30, 1984 

UPPERS & DOWNERS. 

616 MAIN STREET 



33IK 



I 
I 

L. 



SAVE ON YOUR BACK-TO-SCHOOL 



.«^ 



327 W. MAM ST. 




^s 



^^0 






CLAIOOII 

(BESBE TNI HOUSE OF MUSK) Expires Sept. 30,1984 




WELCOME BAC K 

McNUTT JEWELRY 

528 MAIN STREET 
WELCOME BACK CUP STUDENTS 

Stop in and sign up for our 
$10.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE* 

'awarded on Activities Dayj 



.1 ^ "■ ■" 





\l tfELCOME BAC K 

$1.00 OFF 

Clarion University Painters Caps 

with coupon at 

G.C. MURPHY 

DOWNTOWN CLARION 



i gELCOME BAm ^ 

fSOUNTYSEAT RESTAURANT-Main street-226 6332 
Stuff your own 'Baked Potato' 

$1 .68 w/coupon or 
your choice of bacon or sausage with 
2 eggs and h omefries $2.49 w/coupon 




\tf ELCOME 







DOWNTOWN CLARION 
with this coupon until 9-15-84 





with this 
coupon 



l UELCOME BAC K 



DORIAN SHOP 

Welcome Back STUDENTS 

Take an extra $2.00 of f our a! ready 

discounted Lee Jeans 



^^^ 



wT 



\gELCOME 




25% OFF 

All greeting cards in stock 
at the 

BOOK NOOK MAIN STREET, CLARION 



[ ^$,^^^^^^^_^3 





^^.omid ^ 



BOOT 
SHOPS 



FAMfLV FOOTWEAR 



MAIN STREET, CLARION 



Welcome Back 
Students 



All Clarion students are encouraged to take part in the Main Street Merchants' prize draw- 
ing which is part of the Welcome Back CUP promotion. 

It's easy to enter and a number of great prizes, worth approximately $25 each, are up for 
grabs. 

Students can check the ads in this newspaper or stop in the stores to see what prizes are 
being offered. 

At each store, where students want to win a prize, they must register and complete an entry 
blank. One entry blank is in this newspaper and entry blanks for prizes are available at each of 
the participating stores. 

Students must register at every store at which they want to win a prize. No purchase is 
necessary to enter the drawing and you can enter as many times as you want 

The drawing will be Sunday, Sept. 16 during Activities Day events from 1 to 4 p.m. Students 
must register before noon on Saturday, Sept. 15. Winners need not be present on Sunday. 

"SAUO," the jazz band performing on Activities Day, is co-sponsored by the Main Street 
Merchants Association and Center Board. 



12— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Th ursday, Sept. 6, 1984 

_____„„^ ^ — — . ■ ■ ■ 

Classified Ads 



Pa. oil wells ranked third 



Needed: Volunteers to help with the 
"Learn to Swim" Program. See 
Coach Becky Leas in 110 Tippin 
Gym or Call 2453. Lessons begin 
9/10/84. 

Reminder to students taking HPE 
314-CPR Section 01 meets on Sept. 
8 & 9 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
both days. Section 02 meets on 
Sept. 29 & 30 - same time. 

Koinonia Christian Fellowship meets 
every Monday night at 8 p.m. in 
Riemer Coffeehouse. Koinonia is 
Inter-denominational and all are 
welcome! 

Avon Representative needed on 
campus in dormitories. New eve- 
nings program. Call 764-3446. 



Women's swim team managers need- 
ed for publicity, pictures, and col- 
lection of swimmers' statistics. 
Interested? Check with Coach 
Becky Leas in 110 Tippin Gym or 
2453. 

House for rent: N. 5th Ave., 4 bed- 
rooms, 2 full baths, washer and 
dryer. Good for 6-7 students. Call 
Ernie at 226-4653 or 275-4452. 

Students: House available for rent. 
Fall or Spring. Close to campus. 
Newly remodeled. Fully furnish- 
ed. Utilities included. Contact Ke- 
vin, evenings at 226-8617. 

I am the way, the truth and the life; 
No one comes to the Father, but by 
Me. John 14: 6. 



DANCER'S STUDIO 



501 MAIN STREET, CLARION 



^BALLET ^TAP ^ JAZZ ^AEROBICS 
^DANCERISE 



Register now 
by calling 

226-41 32 



Qualified, Experienced 
Instructor 




The history of the petroleum in- 
dustry is rooted in a field outside of 
Titusville, Pa., where Col. Edwin L. 
Drake drilled the first successful 
commercial production well in 
August 1859. Since that day, Penn- 
sylvania and Penn Grade crude 
have played a major role in the 
economic development of both the 
United States and the world. Today, 
32 of the state's 67 counties are 
involved in oil and gas production. 

Here are some other interesting 
facts concerning petroleum pro- 
dui:tion in Pennsylvania. 

• Pennsylvania ranks third in the 
number of wells drilled since 1859. 

• In 1983, there were 20,739 active 
wells in the state. 

• The state produced 4,491,000 



barrels of oil in 1983. 

• The wellhead value of crude pro- 
duced in 1983 was $126,556,000. 

. •The wellhead value of all crude 
produced from 1859 through 1983 was 
$3,609,487,000. 

• Proven reserves at the end of 
1983 totaled 71,010,000 barrels. 

• A total of 2,540 wells were drilled 
in the state during 1983, with a suc- 
cess rate of over 97 percent. 

• About 98 percent of Pennsylva- 
nia wells produce 10 or less barrels 
per day. 

•Average daily production per 
well is about .33 barrels, accounting 
for about .1 percent of total domestic 
production. 

• Col. Drake's well hit oil at about 
69 feet. 



CREEKS 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA 

Welcome back to Clarion! And to 
all the freshmen: Welcome to Clar- 
ion — make the best of it ! 

The sisters of Phi Sigma Sigma 
have started the semester off right 
by busily preparing for rush (hope to 
see you all there), getting our suite 
on 5B Campbell into shape (come up 
and visit), and reacquainting our- 
selves with our studies and friends. 

Congratulations go out to our sis- 
ter, Robyn Martin on her marriage 
to Alpha Chi Rho's Jim Bennington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bennington were wed 
June 16th and some of the sisters at- 



tended the wedding. Her big-big sis- 
ter, Mary Ann Cristini, was the 
bridesmaid for their happy day. We 
wish Robyn and Jim all the love and 
happiness for the rest of their lives 
together. 

Congratulations also go out to one 
of our alumna, Pam Carter, for be- 
coming a National Field Counselor 
for Phi Sigma Sigma. Pam will 
travel to different sorority chapters 
of Phi Sigma Sigma in the United 
States and Canada and it is a high 
honor in our Nationals to become a 
Field Counselor. Way to go Pam ! 

Have a great year everyone ! 



SHARE THE 

COST OF uvmG 

Give to the American Cancer Society. 



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•Today, the average well depth is 
2,254 feet, with well depth ranging 
from 1,300 to 8,000 feet. 

• Over 5,500 people are directly 
employed by the petroleum industry 
in Pennsylvania. 

•All oil produced in the state is 
Penn Grade crude, one of the purest 
crudes available. 

•Penn Grade crude's high par- 
affin content makes it a superior 
lubricating stock, yielding up to 25 
times the amount of lubricants that 
can be refined from crudes produced 
elsewhere. 

These facts were provided by the 
Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Associa- 
tion, and The Pennsylvania Dept. of 
Environmental Resources. 

WCUC is back 

WCUC-FM 91.7, the student run 
radio station of the Communication 
Department of Clarion University, 
will again be broadcasting through- 
out Clarion County and part of Ve- 
nango County in stereo. WCUC-FM 
came back on the air Tuesday, Sept. 
4 at 6 a.m. 

The first place winner in the Penn- 
sylvania Associated Press Broad- 
casters Association News Awards in 
sports and small markets, WCUC 
will again carry the Clarion Univer- 
sity Golden Eagles football season. 

WCUC-FM will have the same 
types of programs and music pre- 
viously heard last year. "The Hits of 
Yesterday" featuring the best hit 
music from 1956 to 1969 will be a new 
addition to the format. A new phy- 
sical feature is a satellite dish lo- 
cated on the top of the station. This is 
to improve the reception of Mutual 
Radio Network and other special e- 
vents, and to allow WCUC-FM to bet- 
ter serve its listening public. 



COLLEGIO ITALIAN RESTAURANT 



EVERY TUESDAY: 16" PIZZA - $2.99 
NO DELIVERY ON SPECIAL 

EVERY FRIDAY: LASAGNA ■ $2.99 



SPECIAL STEAK SANDWICHES 

ROAST BEEF Sandwich $2.40 Hoagle $2.75 

CAPACOLA Sandwich $2.20 Hoagie $2.50 

TURKEY Sandwich $2.20 Hoagie $2.50 

STEAK SANDWICH $2.10 

CHEESE STEAK $2.30 

PIZZA STEAK $2.40 

STEAK, PEPPERS & ONIONS $2.50 

STEAK & PEPPERS $2.30 

STEAK HOAGIE $2.50 

STEAK & MUSH ROOMS $2.70 

CHEESE STEAK HOAGIE $2.70 

MEATBALL $2.20 

SAUSAGE $2.20 

SAUSAGE PARMIGIAN $2.50 

MEATBALL PARMIGIAN $2.50 



CALZONE - $1.75 11 a.m. to close 




COLD SANDWICHES 

ITALIAN HOAGIE $2.20 

HAM AND SALAMI $1.80 

PROVOLONE AND SALAMI $1.80 

TUNA SANDWICH $2.10 

TUNA HOAGIE $2.40 

STROMBOLI $8.00 Small $3.25 

(made with cheese, sausage, pepperoni, green peppers, mushrooms, onions and ham) 

CALZONE $2.25 

(nnade with mozzerella and ricotta cheese and ham) 

SAUSAGE ROLL $1.00 



FREE DELIVERY 226-5421 





THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984—13 



Welcome Back 



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Apollodorus 

526 MAIN STREET, CLARION 
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226-5431 



Klingensmith's 

Autumn Leaf 

Town and 
Country Cleaners 

TanaShear 



College 



McDonald's 



Hawk Electronics 



Wendy's 



Kentucky Fried 



7th Avenue 



Rea & Oerick 



Space's Hardware 
Children's Shop 



Golden Dawn 



Dit's Gifts 
Wein's Dept. Store 
Uppers and Downers 
James Jewelers 
Paul Weaver Jeweler 
Don Miller Shoes 



6th Ave 



Crook's Clothing 

Shear Shed 

County Seat 

Dan Estadt's 

First Seneca 

W.D.I. 

New Creations Photography 



Variety Distributing Fox's Pizza 
Guys& Dolls 
Dorian Shop 
McNutt Jewelry 
Apollodorus Music 
Cardtowne 
G.C. Murphy Knot & Plant 



Coke's Cutters 



Sth Avenue 



COURT 
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PARK 



Northwest Bank 



4th Avenue 



Western Shed 



M. J. Parker 



3rd Avenue 



Stadium 



Wilshire's 




14-THE CLARISN CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



r 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984—15 



Survey answers why people drink beer 



I 



Madonna re-elected APSCUF president 



Beer, once just a quick thirst- 
quincher, is being selected as care- 
fully by some people these days as a 
good wine. Their reason is simple: 
Taste. 

Obviously, there still exists a big 
demand for a cold, frosty mug of 
beer on a hot summer's day. 

Or a draft to go with a hot dog. 

Or a six-pack to sip while watching 
television. 

But something else is happening. 

More and more people are select- 
ing a beer especially for its flavor, or 
to complement a meal, for those 
times when not just any beer will do. 
Th ey're becoming more discerning 
and adverturesome in their choices 
of beer. And liking it. 

They're choosing a big-bodied, 
full-flavored beer like those popular 
before Prohibition. What we have is 
a generational phenomenon that is 
bringing us full circle in our tastes. 

Along with the shift in taste has 
come an increasing appreciation for 
all beer. 

There is another, more practical, 
reason for this popularity that all of 
us are obliged to address — alcohol 
content. Americans are becoming 
more aware of the dangers of drink- 
ing and driving. They are looking for 
something to drink with low alcohol 
content, and they're turning to beer. 
Beer is the beverage of moderation. 
It has brought people down from 
martinis for lunch and away from 
the "one for the road." 

Beer is diluted, so it naturally has 
less alcohol than liquor, and it is ab- 
sorbed by the blood a lot slower than 
liquor. 

Something else is happening with 
beer. It is no longer considered just a 
man's drink. Women, in larger num- 
bers, are finding they enjoy a beer 
just as much as any man. They don't 
find themselves ordering the obliga- 
tory white wine anymore. 

This wider interest in beer among 
both men and women has led to 
more intense interest about what 
makes a good beer. That includes 
the difference between light beer, 
regular beer and super premium, 
and what makes imported beers dif- 
ferent from American beers. 

This is what they're finding. 

American brewers, from the 
largest like Budweiser, to the smal- 
ler regional ones like Pittsburgh 
Brewing, Anchor Brewing and 
Udical, produce quality beers using 
quality ingredients and the latest in 
technology and the brewer's art. 

Hops, malts and water go into all 
beers. The difference in flavor re- 
sults from two things — the type of 
grain used and the time required for 
fermentation. Typical American 
beers use hops and malts that are 
more easily grown and readily avail- 
able. But they don't produce the 
same full flavor of those used in the 
old-fashioned, full-bodied beers. 

Secondly, and maybe more 
important, is the time and time of 
fermentation. Standard American 
beers are fermented once and quick- 
ly. The classic beers are often fer- 
mented twice. 

The next time you sit down to play 
Trivial Pursuits, try these ques- 
tions: 

Q. Who discovered what makes 
beer beer? 

Louis Pasteur discovered that 
yeast makes beer. Prior to that, peo- 
ple let their formulas sit around and 
stew. Somesimes this produced beer 
and sometimes it didn't. 



Q. What were the three great water- 
sheds in the history of American 
beer drinking? 

A. Prohibition, World War II and 
the advent of the Television Era. 
Prohibition forced hundreds of small 
breweries out of business, thus elim- 
inating a rainbow of beer tastes. 
Those that survived to Repeal set- 
tled on a somewhat standard form- 
ula that satisfied the tastes of the 
times. World War II re-introduced 
hundreds of thousands of GIs to the 



exotic tastes of full-bodied European 
beers. 

While they went back to standard 
domestic brands after the war, the 
exposure showed American men 
that beers could taste different and 
still be enjoyable. Television 
brought with it instant mass com- 
munication and the six-pack-to- 
watch-television-with. 

Q. Where did you get your taste 
for, or against, certain beers? 

A. Some theoriticians believe taste 



preferences are acquired genetical- 
ly. So, if your parents come from 
Yugoslavia or Germany, you might 
be predisposed toward heavily-flav- 
ored foods and full-bodied beers, 
even if you have never eaten or 
drunk them. 

Q. What is the best temperature at 
which to drink beer? 

A. 48 degrees Fahrenheit. If you 
serve ice cold beer, that's 32 
degrees, and that can dull the taste 



drinking and can't appreciate the 
beer's full flavor. 

Q. TV ads show beer in those cone- 
shaped pilsner glasses, pouring over 
the sides. Is that the best kind of 
glass? 

A. No. With those kinds of glasses, 
the flavor dissipates too quickly. The 
best glass to drink beer from is 
straight-sided, like a mug. That 
way, the beer retains its full flavor. 
And the beer should be inside the 



A Millersville University History 
professor has been reelected as 
President of the Association of 
Pennsylvania State College and Uni- 
versities (APSCUF), the organiza- 
tion that represents the 4500 faculty 
members of the 14 publicly owned 
universities. 

Dr. G. Terry Madonna was se- 
lected by the delegates at APSCUF's 



57th Legislative Assembly held last 
spring in Lancaster to head the or- 
ganization for an unprecedented 
third consecutive term. The 
Legislative Assembly is the chief 
governing body of the association. 

"I am pleased that the APSCUF 
delegates have elected me to a third 
term," Madonna said. "I will 
continue to strive for excellence in 



buds. You don't know what you're glass, not outside. 




Come to McDonald's,® buy a Big 
Mac*' sandwich and any size 
order of fries, and you' 
a 0t«lM4i%^' pen FREE! 

rn^Ma^ IS a69C 
value, yours FREE just 
for enjoying the taste 
of a delicious Big Mac. 

Get yourself a 
mi^mJi in a different 
color each week 
Then you decide 
which color is best 
for highlighting 
important things 
like your roommate's 
portion of the 
phone bill! 

Welcome back to 
campus, and to 
McDonald's! 

Offer good through September 30, 1984 or while supplies last, 
only at this McDonald's Restaurant: 707 Main St., Clarion. 



Not valid in conjunction 

with any other offer 

One m^Ma^ per Big Mac. 



£ 1983 McDonald s Corporation 




This piece of art Is one of many now on display at the Sandford Art Gallery un- 
til Sept. 24 as part of the Handcrafted Art for the Home. Photo by Chuck Lizza 



LNIYCCSITr 



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higher education in Pennsylvania, 
and work to enhance the image of 
the State System of Higher Educa- 
tion faculty." 

Also, the delegates to the APSCUF 
Legislative Assembly elected Pro- 
fessor Nadine Donachy of Clarion 
University as vice-president and 
Professor James Gray of Indiana 
University as Treasurer. Madelyn 
Valunas, a Shippensburg University 
librarian, was reelected secretary. 

Dr. Madonna was a major force in 
the legislative passage of Act 188 of 
1982, the law which created the new 
university system in Pennsylvania. 
He was then a gubernatorial ap- 
pointee to the transition term that 
iH'ought about the implementation of 
the new system. 

Additionally, Dr. Madonna was 
appointed by Giov. Dick Tliornburgh 
to the Board of the Benjamin Frank- 
lin Partnership Fund, the state's 
multi-million dollar advanced tech- 
nology initiative. 

Donachy has been an APSCUF 
member since 1971 and has held 
numerous local offices in addition to 
participating in several statewide 
committees. She has been at Clarion 
University for 22 years. 



Gray has also been an active 
APSCUF member for 13 years. The 
Indiana University professor just 
completed a one year term as 
Indiana University Chapter Presi- 
dent. 

Valunas, beginning a second term 
as secretary, also brings a wealth of 
association experience to the lead- 
ership. A past president of Shippens- 
burg University APSCUF, Valunas 
has been involved with many state 
and local committees. 



An effort to live 

Physical therapists in the state of 
Pennsylvania treat thousands of pa- 
tients yearly who have suffered dis- 
abling injuries in moving vehicle ac- 
cidents. 

The Pennsylvania Physical Ther- 
apy Association reminds us that the 
use of seat belts may significantly 
reduce the chances that you will 
need physical therapy if you are in- 
volved in a car accident. 

Like all good habits, remembering 
to "buckle-up" may require some 
effort. 




ON ALL PURCHASES 

when you present this coupon 



Wilshires Flowers & Gifts 

Coupon expires Sept. 30, 1984 




A lot of students ore registering for Army 
ROTC, They'll be experiencing some new 
and different challenges. The thrill of 
walking on walls as you rappel off a fifty- 
foot tower is just one. 

All of the exciting training comes with a 
free trial offer. The ^^ree" means that if 
they decide to leave Army ROTC during 
their first two years, they con with no 
military obligation. That's how sure we are 
they'll wont to stay in. 

Call : Captain David Weatherby 
on Thorn St. ROTC BIdg. I 
226-2292 

(fi)Army ROTC. 

Learn what it takes to lead. 




16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 




Universal Productions presents "The Wild Life," starring: Jenny Wright, 
Christopher Penn, Lea Thompson, Eric Stoltz, llan Mitchell-Smith. 



Universal Productions presents Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin in "All of Me." 



Universal Pictures Releases Two 



Universal Pictures is delighted to 
offer a sneak peek at two of the stu- 
dio's upcoming September film re- 
leases that are sure to be of special 
interest to college audiences. 

The first back-to-school special 
stars Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin 
in Carl Reiner's "All of Me," a 
halarious new comedy in which 
Steve and Lily find themselves shar- 
ing the same body. Steve controls 
the left side and Lily controls the 
right side and you can imagine the 
problems this creates with everyday 
functions such as walking, talking, 
eating and. . . 

"All of Me" opens in theatres 
throughout the United States and 
Canada on Friday, Sept. 21. 



"The Wild Life," which premieres 
nationally on Friday, Sept. 28, 
comes from the creators of "Fast 
Times at Ridgemont High," Art Lin- 
son and Cameron Crowe. It follows 
five young people through their lives 
at the very end of summer and 
focuses on a real and funny way on 
such themes as the disasterous ex- 
periences of two young men getting 
their first apartment, two young 
girls outgrowing their boyfriends 
and venturing forth into the world of 
older men and a youth who develops 
a friendship with a Vietnam Vet that 
will forever change him. 

"The Wild Life" features a group 
of rising young stars, including 
Christopher Penn ("Footloose," 



"All the Right Moves," "Rumble 
Fish"), Lea Thompson ("All the 
Right Moves," "Jaws 3-D"), Dan 
Mitchell-Smith ("Daniel"), Jenny 
Wright ("Pink Floyd's the WaU," 
"The World According to Garp"), 
Eric Stoltz ("Fast Times at Ridge- 
mont ffigh"). Rick Moranis (SCTV, 
"Ghost Busters," "Streets of Fire," 
"Strange Brew"), Hart Bochner 
("Rich and Famous," "Breaking 
Away") and Randy Quaid ("Nation- 
al Lampoon's Vacation"), plus 
music composed by Eddie Van 
Halen. 

When the new semester rolls 
around, Universal Pictures will be 
there with "All of Me" and "The 




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DIANE RINGEL 

Smuckers Hires 
'82 Graduate 

llie J. M. Smucker Company re- 
cently named Diane Ringel as Mar- 
keting Research Analyst to the Mar- 
keting Department, ^e will be re- 
sponsible for analyzing marketing 
information to provide assistance in 
decision making for marketing and 
sales managers. Ringel attended 
Clarion Univo^ity of Pennsylvania 
in 1982 where she received her BS 
degree in Business Administration. 



Wild Life" to provide a few laughs 
and to help brighten the way. 

PICPA 

Scliolarshlp 
awarded 

Patricia L. Harnish, Lamartine, 
has received a $1,000 scholarship 
from the Pennsylvania Institute of 
Certified Public Accountants 
(PICPA). 

To encourage students to pursue 
careers as CPAs, the PICPA pro- 
vides scholarships and honorable 
mention awards to junior year ac- 
counting majors on the basis of high 
scholastic achievement and 
qualities of leadership. 

Harnish is a Dean's List student at 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
and plans to graduate with a B.S. de- 
gree in business administration, 
majoring in accounting. She is pres- 
ident of the Data Processing Man- 
agement Association's student chap- 
ter; treasurer of the Salem Youth 
Fellowship, and a member of the 
Accounting Club and Phi Eta Sigma, 
the national freshman honor society. 
Harnish was recognized for her 
achievement by the PICPA's North- 
western Qiapter. 

The PICPA's Trustees of the 
Scholarship Fund awarded a total of 
$20,950 to 49 studoits nominated 
from Pennsylvania Colleges and uni- 
versities in 1963-84. TTie PICPA is the 
second oldest and fifth largest pro- 
fessional association of CPAs in the 
country with over 12,000 members. 



Thiel College 

extends 

entertainment 

Thiel College has expanded its en- 
tertainment program for the 1984 
academic year. 

A SRO series has been added to 
the Thiel Artists and Lecturers of- 
ferings to provide programs to suit a 
wide range of interests. Among 
these are the Cabaret Dinner 
Theatre, Festival Madrigal Dinner, 
and Chamber Music evenings. 

Included in the SRO Series will be 
the Red Fox/Second Hangin', a 
production of Roadside Theatre at 
8:15 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, Roth 
Hall Auditorium; Frankenstein with 
Jon Spelman, 8:15 p.m. Thursday, 
Jan. 24, 1985, and Les Ballet Jazz de 
Montreal, 8:15 p.m., Thursday, 
March 21, 1985. 

Martha Schlamme wiU be high- 
hghted at the Cabaret Dinner Thea- 
tre. Dinner will be a 6:30 p.m. 
Saturday, Sept. 22 in the Livingston 
Hall Dining Room, while the curtain 
will go up at 8: 15 p.m. 

The Festive Madrigal Dinner is to 
be at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, in 
the Sawhill Georgian Room, Howard 
Miller Center. Costumed Madrigal 
singers will perform traditional 
music and carols of the holiday sea- 
son. 

Chamber Music performances 
will take place at 8:15 p.m. Fridays, 
Oct. 5, and Nov. 30, 1984, and Feb. 1, 
and April 12, 1985. Performing art- 
ists will be announced later. 

The Thiel Players season will 
include "Medea" at 8 p.m. Thurs- 
day-Saturday, Nov. 8-10; "Two by 
Two," 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Thursday, 
Dec. 6, and 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 7; 
and "Joseph," 8 p.m. Thursday-Sat- 
urday, April 18-20, 1985. 

Scheduled as the films in the In- 
ternational Cinema Series will be 
"The Bicycle Thief," Sept. 11; "A 
Slave of Love," Oct. 9; "Pandora's 
Box," Nov. 13; "Qosely Watched 
Trains," Dec. 4; "Beauty and the 
Beast," Jan. 15, 1985; "Accident," 
Feb. 5, 1985; "Ashes and 
Diamonds," March 12, 1985, and 
"Yojimbo," April 16, 1985. The show- 
ings are at 7 p.m. Tuesdays in the 
Bly Lecture Hall, Academic Center. 

The 1984 Christmas Festival will 
be held in the William A. Passavant 
Memorial Center at 4 and 7:30 p.m. 
Sunday, Dec, 2. 

Exhibits at the Sampson Art 
Gallery in the Miller Center include 
a Watercolor Show, Sept. 6-30; Pos- 
ter Collection from the International 
Poetry Forum, Oct. 4 to Nov. 4; 
Invitational Pottery Show, Nov. 8 to 
Dec. 9; Paintings of Barry Gealt, 
Jan. 10 to 30, 1985; Paintings of Mark 
Mentzer, Feb. 7 to 27, 1985; Senior 
Show, March 14 to 31, 1985, and All- 
Student Show, April 11 to 28. 

In addition to the college pro- 
grams the Passavant Center is the 
home for the Greenville Community 
Concert Series and the Greenville 
Symphony Orchestra. The 
Conununity Concert Series includes 
the Max Morath Quintet, 8 p.m. 
Wednesday, Sept. 26; Empire Brass 
Quintet, 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, 
1964, and Keith and Rusty McNeil in 
A Caravan of Song, 3:30 p.m. 
Sunday, March 31, 1985. 

Complete information about tick- 
ets may be secured by contacting 
the Dean of Students Office, 412-588- 
7700, Ext. 213. 



^ 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984-17 



'Trifles make perfection, and perfection is no trifle." 

Michelangelo 



Michalski finalizes plans for marching band 



i 



Dr. Stanley F. Michalski, Jr., 
Conductor of Bands at Clarion Uni- 
versity, has finalized plans for the 
activities of the bands at Clarion for 
the 1984-85 academic year. During 
Dr. Michalski's 24 year tenure as 
conductor of bands, Uie Qarion Uni- 
versity Bands have established a 
reputation of excellence in per- 
formance - both on the football field 
and the concert stage. 

The bands at Clarion University 
are organized to support the musical 
needs of the university through a 
variety of benefits to band personnel 
and their audiences. They seek to 
stimulate musical growth among 
college students, provide expert 
training and preparation for aspir- 
ing music teachers and performers; 
make available a channel to the non- 
music major student who enjoys the 
art as an avocation; promote and 
sustain the proud musical heritage 
of the American public school 
music ; offer its personnel a rich and 
unique social contact, and serve the 
university in its scope of musical 
functions - from the football field to 
the concert stage. 

Preparations have been made for 
the initial auditions and rehearsals 
for the 1984 Golden Eagle Marching 
Band with 130 students reporting on 
Sunday, Aug. 26 for the first rehear- 
sal. This group has been selected 
from 250 students contacted 
throughout Pennsylvania and the 
surrounding states relative to mem- 
bership in the organization which 
has gained a reputation as one of the 
best of its kind in the state. On the 
initial day, auditions were held for a 
120-piece complement of musicians, 
managers, photographers, announc- 
ers, and band front. Among those 
auditioning were the 78 returning 
upper classmen in addition to the 
freshmen transfer students or 
upperclassmen trying out for the 
first time. 

Auditions have been held weekly 
throughout the summer. The 100 
playing musicians will make the 
Clarion University Golden Eagle 
Marching Band one of the largest 
university bands in Pennsylvania. 
The continuous growth of the band 
numerically is largely due to several 
factors: increased interest in musi- 
cal performance at Clarion Univer- 
sity, enrollment in the various 
musical degree programs, and the 
addition of professional personnel to 
assist with ttie band program. 

Assisting Dr. Michalski with the 
band program is Mr. Lawrence J. 
Wells, Instructor of Percussion and 
Assistant Conductor of Bands at 
Clarion University. In addition to his 
work with the Golden Eagle Band 
and Wymphonic Band, he is Musical 
Director of the CUP Percussion En- 
semble and teaches Applied Percus- 
sion and Percussion Techniques. 
Mr. WeUs received the Bachelor of 
Music Degree in Instnmiental Music 
Education from the University of 
Idaho; Moscow, Idaho; in 1975 and 
the Master of Music Degree in Per- 
cussion Performance from the 
University of Oregon; Eugene, Ore- 
gon ; in 1977. Mr. Wells is a candidate 
for the Doctor of Music Arts degree 
in Percussion Performance and 
Literature at the Eastman School of 
Music in Rochester, N.Y. Mr. Wells 
has played professionally with the 
Eugene Symphony Orchestra as 
Principal Percussionist and 
Assistant Timpanist as well as with 
the Spokane Symi^ony Orchestra 
and the Idaho Bi-Centennial Orches- 
tra at Kennedy Center. Mr. Wells 



also performed as Timpanist with 
the University of Oregon Summer 
Music Festival Orchestra and Bach 
Cantata Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Helmuth Rilling. In addition 
to performing, he has also been ac- 
tive as a recitalist and clinician 
throughout the state of Oregon. 

The majorette corps has been se- 
lected by audition and Dr. Michalski 
has chosen Kim Keffer, a senior 
from Fayette City, to serve as head 
majorette. Kim is a graduate of 
Belle Vernon High School where she 
served as feature twirler for two 
years. Kim has won over 160 
trophies and medals in her career. 
She was Miss La-Petite of Pennsyl- 
vania, First runner-up Miss Major- 
ette of Penna., and was mascot for 
the Philadelphia 76'ers. Kim is a 
member of the International Twirl- 
ing Teachers Association, and will 
soon be qualified as a National 
Baton Twirling Judge. 

Other members of the 1984 Major- 
ette Squad are Shari Rose, Charlene 
Wisniewski, Kathryn Porter, Susan 
Reese, and Denise Ginther. 

The Golden Girl for the 1984 
season will be Joyce Mainhart, a 
sophomore majoring in Elementary 
Education. She is a graduate from 
Knoch High School where she served 
as golden twirler for three years. 
She was third runner-up in the Miss 
Majorette of Pennsylvania and has 
earned over 350 awards in her 
career. She has been in "Who's Who 
in Baton Twirling", "America's Out- 
standing Names and Faces", and 
"Pennsylvania Achievement Acad- 
emy." 

Ilie Silk Squad Co-Captains for the 
1984 season will be Michelle Alls- 
house, of Johnstown and Debbie Ci- 
kosky, a Clarion Area graduate. 
Allshouse is a graduate of Westmont 
Hilltop and served three years as a 
member of the color guard unit. She 
was a member of the homecoming 
court and will major in Elementary 
Education. Debbie Chikosky is an 
honor graduate of Clarion Area and 
was captain of the high school silk 
squad. She will also major in Ele- 
mentary Education with a concen- 
tration in early childhood. 

As in past years, the band will 
travel to away football games and 
will appear at aU home games in 
addition to several community func- 
tions. Several interesting half-time 
performances are being planned by 
the band staff for the marching 
season. Shows with themes and ap- 
propriate music centering around 
"1984 Movie Hits", "FooUoose", and 
"Big Band Sounds." 

September 29 has been designated 
Band Alumni Day, during which the 
returning alumni will perform 
during the half-time of the Qarion- 
Geneva College game. Approxi- 
mately 50 alumni have indicated 
that they will be in attendance for 
the annual event. A program of re- 
hearsals, performances, and recep- 
tions is scheduled for this weekend. 



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Majorettes for the 1984 Golden Eagle Marching Band at Clarion University are: Kathy Porter, Shari Rose, Denise Gin- 
ther, Golden Girl Joyce Mainhart, Charlene Wisniewski, Sue Reese and Head Majorette Kim Keffer. 



Band Parent's Day, also an annual 
event is scheduled for November 10. 
Last year, approximately 375 
parents and friends of the band par- 
ticipated in the festivities of the day 
which included morning refresh- 
ments, a film presentation of pre- 
vious shows, attendance at the foot- 
ball game, and a post-game concert 
at the stadium. This year, the 
Marching Band Revue will be pre- 
sented that same evening, at 8:15 in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. During 
the revue, a complete musical pres- 
entation is rendered for those in at- 
tendance, and a recording of the per- 
formance will be made for interest- 
ed students and alumni. 

The Clarion University Symphonic 
Band is a highly skilled ensemble of 
80 wind and percussion players. 
Membership is determined by audi- 
tion. Placement in the band is de- 



pendent upon the outcome of the 
audition and the instrumentation 
needs at that time. As a member of 
one of the largest and most respect- 
ed organizations on campus, band 
members feel an intense pride and 
loyalty to the band. 

Its musical and educational objec- 
tives are to perform literature of the 
highest aesthetic value, with an 
emphasis on original works for 
band, to attain perfection in per- 
formance ability through rigid re- 
quirements for individual musician- 
ship and advanced playing techni- 
que, and to provide a means for 
artistic expression through partici- 
pation in a distinctive mecUum of 
musical expression. 

The Symphonic Band is recogniz- 
ed for its flexibility and musician- 
ship. The repertoire of the band 
which is extensive, varied, and flex- 



ible; is selected from all periods and 
styles of composition and is designed 
to meet a variety of program re- 
sponsibilities. 

During the past 22 years, the band 
has performed 267 concerts while on 
tour through Pennsylvania. The 
Mexico City-Acapulco tour in the 
spring of 1984 highlighted the activi- 
ties of the 1983-84 ensemble. 

The Symphonic Band is featured 
in two main concerts each year on 
campus and two tours to different 
areas of the Commonwealth. Guest 
artists appearing with the band in 
recent years include: Rafael 
Mendez, Bob Lowry, Warren 
Covington, James Burke, Frank Ar- 
senault, Roy Bums, James Dunlop, 
William Bell, Martin Mailman, Sgt. 
Charles Kuliga, Roger Pemberton, 
Sgt. Ronal Foster, and Col. Eugene 
Allen. 



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18-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6. 1984 



Clarion gridders to play in 25th anniversary game 



The 1984 football season is an anni- 
versary one in the Pennsylvania 
Conference. The PC, one of the few 
leagues in the nation to culminate its 
regular season with a championship 
game on the gridiron, will stage its 
title "State Game" for the 25th con- 
secutive time this fall. Qarion will 
be participating in this year's game. 
Defending PC champion Clarion 
and '83 Eastern Division titleholder 
East Stroudsburg are favored to 
meet on Nov. 17 at Hershey Stadium 
for this year's crown. Both current 
conference powers are ranked 
among the NCAA Division II top 10. 



Clarion is rated No. 3 and East 
Stroudsburg No. 8 in the Sports Il- 
lustrated pre-season poll. 

Grid action in the PC kicks off this 
Saturday when Edinboro, the only 
league team to defeat Clarion a year 
ago, travels south into West Virginia 
to oppose West Liberty. All PC 
schools are scheduled next 
Saturday, Sept. 8, with Eastern and 
Western Division play set to begin 
Sept. 22. 

Entering his 25th year of PC 
championship play under the 
present East vs. West title game for- 
mat, Clarion continues to hold the 



top spot in NCAA Div. II with 20 
straight winning seasons in football. 
The Golden Eagles are looking for 
their fifth PC "State Game" ap- 
pearing since 1977. 

West Chester remains the all-time 
winningest team in Div. II. Records 
since 1937 show the Golden Rams 
with a 55-year record of 344-137-16 
for a .708 winning percentage. East 



Stroudsburg moved up a notch on 
the NCAA victory ladder into the No. 
4 petition iwth a 56-year record of 
289-163-17 for a .634 winning per- 
centage. 

And three PC head coaches cur- 
rently rank among the winningest 
active NCAA Div. II coaches in the 
nation. Based upon winning percent- 



age for a minimum of five years, 
Denny Douds of East Stroudsburg 
ranks fifth (73-27-1 in 10 years at 
ESU for a .728 winning percentage), 
Gene Carpenter of Millersville ranks 
eighth (%-43-3 over 15 years at MU 
for a .684 winning percentage), and 
Denny Creehan of Edinboro ranks 
17th (31-18-1 over 5 years at EU for a 
.630 winning percentage) . 



Lady Eagles Gain Eight New 
Recruits For 1984 Season 



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ATTENTION 
COMMUNICATIONS STUDENTS 

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dark room supplies 

•Chemicals 

•Paper 

•Jugs, Graduates, Funnels, etc. 

•Tri-X, B/W Film only $2.51 a roll 

All items are ready to go on stock 

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(Next to Bob's Sub) 



Clarion University Women's 
Tennis Coach Norbert Baschnagel 
has announced that he has eight 
freshmen recruits for the Fall 1984 
term. They are Susie Fritz, Vicki 
Vemi, Dawn Funya, Kathleen Mil- 
liken, Darla Kneebone, Bena 
Hefflin, Elaine Leff and Lisa 
Thompson. 

Fritz is a talented player who cap- 
tured the District IX singles title in 
1982, 83, and 84, plus won the District 
IX doubles championship in 1983. 

Vemi, a two year letterwinner at 
Western Wayne High School, had an 
outstanding 9-1 singles and (k)ubles 
her junior year and followed that 
with an 8-2 singles and 9-1 doubles 
her senior year. 

Milliken, who earned two varsity 
letters at Penn Trafford High 
School, was third in doubles her 
senior year in the Keystone Con- 
ference Tournament. 

Kneebone, helped her team at 
Bangor High School to an 8-8 dual 
meet record last year, was U-O as a 
singles player and was part of the 
school's No. 1 doubles team. Darla 
was seeded No. 1 in the district 11 
tournament and was awarded a Les- 
ser Scholarship in athletics at Clar- 
ion for her outstanding academic 
contributions at Bangor. 

Hefflin, a four-year letterwinner 
at Peabody High School, who also 
doubled as the team captain from 
1983-84, was the City League doubles 
champ in 1984. 



Leff, also from Peabody, won 
three letters in tennis and was like- 
wise the City League coubles 
champ. 

Thompson, who played No. 2 at 
Shaler High School in 1963-84, rolled 
iq) a 16-4 singles record. S9ie won the 
Region 7 doubles championship in 
1983, was third in Western Pennsyl- 
vania doubles and was third in ttie 
PIAA state (k>ubles tourney. 

Funya, also from Shaler, has 
much knowledge of the game and 
adds much straigth to the team. 

There are also four returning play- 
ers, two of which will serve as co- 
captains. Kim Demaio and Lynn 
Fye will be the co-captains for the 
team this year, they are both 
juniors. Demaio was the No. 1 
singles player last year and Fye was 
No. 5 last year. Demaio worked all 
sunmier at a tennis camp and has 
tried to home her technique. Fye 
played in four or five summer tour- 
naments throughout the summer. 

The other two returning players 
are juniOT Amy Brenner and soph- 
omore Susan Reeder. Brenner will 
be out for soine time due to an 
injury. 

Baschnagel will rater his third 
year as the CUP Women's Tennis 
coach in 1984 and is looking to stead- 
ily improve the Eagles' program. 
The Golden Eagles have 13 dual 
meets on the 1964 schedule, one of 
the largest in CUP history. Basch- 



nagel will stress the three C's of 
coaching tennis which are control, 
consistency, and concentration. 

"We'll be young in 1984, but our 
goals of having a winning season and 
gaining some high individual places 
at the state championships can be 
achieved with hard work, patience 
and consistent team play," said the 
Clarion coach. 





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Clarion lands three 
basketball recruits 



Clarion University has signed 
three promising basketball recruits 
for the 1984 fall term. 

Head basketball coach Dick Tay- 
lor announced Charles "Punky" 
Barrouk, 6-2, 190 lb. guard from Red 
Land High School, Ciaran Lesikar, 6- 
6, 190 lb. forward from Centennial 
High School, and Tim Roosevelt, 6-2, 
180 lb. guard from McKinley High 
School have signed "letters of in- 
tent" for CUP. 

"We are very happy that Ciaran, 
Tim, and Punky have decided to con- 
tinue their athletic and academic 
careers at Qarion," Taylor said. 
"They are all quality athletes who 
can contribute immediately in our 
program," the Clarion head coach 
said. 

L^ikar, a native of Columbia, 
Md., was a three-year varsity letter- 
winner at Centennial High in EUicott 
City, Md. Nicknamed "Smurf," 
Lesikar averaged 14 points and 10.5 
rebounds per game in his senior 
year and was named to the "All 
County Team." 

Coached by Sam Leishure, Lesik- 
ar also was named as the "Most Im- 
proved Player" in his junior year. 

"Ciaran is a very good player in 
the paint and uses both hands well," 
Taylor said. "His intensity and com- 
petitiveness are attributes that also 
caught our eyes," he said. 

Active in other sports, Ciaran let- 
tered four years in track and two 
years in football. 

The son of Ruth Ellen Hellyer, of 
5440 Fall River Ct., Columbia, Md., 
Lesikar will enter Clarion undecided 
in his academic major. 

Roosevelt, a native of Buffalo, 
N.Y., led McKinley High to a City 
League Championship this year, 
with the "Macks" registering a 13-1 
league record and a 19-2 overall 
mark. 

Roosevelt averaged over 20 points, 
six rebounds and four assists per 
game in the 1983-84 season. A four- 
year letterwinner, Roosevelt aver- 



aged six points per game as a fresh- 
man, 12 points per game as a sopho- 
more and 15 points per game as a 
junior. 

"Tim will give quality shooting 
ability from the number two guard 
spot, plus has good passing ability," 
Taylor said. 

"He also has excellent experience 
from playing in a good league and 
has displayed the enthusiasm we 
look for in a collegiate player," Tay- 
lor said. 

Roosevelt is the son of Mattie and 
James Roosevelt, of 35 Holland PL, 
Buffalo, N.Y. He was also an honor 
roll student his junior and senior 
years, besides earning athletic let- 
ters in track, cross country and foot- 
ball. 

Named to the "AU High" and 
"Western New York" all star teams 
this year, Roosevelt was also the 
MVP in the St. Francis Tournament 
and made the all tournament team 
in the Lewistown Tournament. 

Roosevelt was coached by Mel 
Gust at McKinley. 

In case the name sounds familiar, 
yes, Roosevelt is the brother of for- 
mer Clarion great Chris Roosevelt. 
Chris Roosevelt is fourth in all time 
career scoring at Clarion with 1,588 
points, fifth in rebounding with 867 
and fifth in career assists with 263. 

Barrouk, in his senior year, aver- 
aged 24 points, 12 rebounds and five 
assists per game, and set a record at 
Red Land in career scoring by net- 
ting 1,424 points. 

In addition, Barrouk earned four 
basketball letters, was selected to 
the "Big 15", was named an AP Hon- 
orable Mention, was named the 
WHTM-TV, Harrisburg, MVP and 
the Mid-Penn League MVP. 

While accomplishing all of that on 
the hardwood, Barrouk was also a 
National Honor Society student at 
Red Land. 

"He's really a role-model for the 
student-athlete, and we're extreme- 
ly happy that he's going to attend 



IHli^RHHH 




Jl THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. Pa. 


Thursday, Sept. 6, 


1984-19 






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NEW RECRUITS: From left, Charles "Punky" Burrouk, Tim Roosevelt, and Ciaran Lesikar look forward to a produc- 
tive rookie season at Clarion. Photo by Chris Sturnick 



Clarion," Taylor said. The Clarion 
head coach said he found a lot to Uke 
about the young eager. 

"He impressed us with is enthu- 
siasm for the game, his attitude as a 
team player and overall strength, as 
well as his quality basketball skills," 
Taylor said. He said Barrouk will 
bring strength to the Eagles on both 
the offense and the defense. 

"We believe Punky will bring us 
soUd outside shooting and the ability 
to play both ends of the floor, which 
is so important in the Pennsylvania 
Conference," added CUP assistant 
coach Ken Richter. 

"He can help us immediately," 
Richter said. "We project him as a 
number two guard in college." 

Barrouk, was coached at Red 
Land by Denny Beshore, saw the Pa- 
triots finish with an overall record of 
10-16 and a 7-9 mark in the Mid-Penn 
Conference. 

The Clarion Golden Eagles 
captured the Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference Western 
Division crown in 1983-84 with a rec- 
ord of 8-2, 15-11 overall. 

Taylor, who was voted PSAC-West 



Coach of the Year for the second 
straight year, saw his Eagles get off 
to a poor start early in the year with 
a record of 2-7. 

Clarion caught fire and won 13 of 
its last 17 games to gain first place. 



Not only has Taylor won the Western 
Division twice in his two years as 
Qarion's head coach, but the Eagles 
have won or tied for the PSAC-West 
crown seven out of the last eight 
years. 



WELCOME BACK STUDENTS! 

All Clarion University Students 
are invited to enjoy fine dining at the 

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This Saturday, Sept. 8 



CAB'S 



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the first dance of the semester 

Candlelig/it Dancing 

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Sponsored by the 

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CAB'S continues 

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20— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 6, 1984 



Eagles open season at Fairmont on Saturday 



Clarion University's football 
team, under second year head coach 
Gene Sobolewski, opens its 1984 grid- 
iron schedule on the road with 
rugged non-conference foe Fairmont 
State College (Fairmont, W.Va.) on 
Saturday, Sept. 8. Kickoff is set for 
1:30 p.m. at Fairmont's Rosier 
Field. 

The Golden Eagles, who were 9-2 a 
year ago and won the PSAC Champ- 
ionship by defeating East Strouds- 




RunnJng back Elton Brown is ready 
for another exciting season along with 
the rest of the Golden Eagle squad. 

File photo 



burg 27-14, return 40 lettermen and 
17 of its starting 22 from a year ago. 
Eight starters are back in the fold on 
offense while nine starters return on 
what could be a very stingy defen- 
sive squad. 

Fairmont, who i^ also opening its 
1984 schedule on Saturday, begins 
the new season with its third head 
coach in the last three seasons, 
namely first year mentor Wally 
Hood. Hood arrived at Fairmont 
before the 1984 Spring practice from 
Ohio Northern University, where he 
had a 10-year record of 49-39-3 and 
was highly respected by his peers. 
He inherits a Falcon team that was 
better than its 2-7-1 record in 1983, 
which is reflected in its four 
previous seasons of 6-3 (1982), 9-2 
(1981), 6-3-1 (1980) and 9-1-1 (1979). 

"They traditionally have a fine, 
fundamental football team and 
knowing coach Hood's excellent rep- 
utation, that tradition at Fairmont 
will continue for years to come," 
commented Clarion mentor Gene 
Sobolewski. "They have installed a 
Wing-T offense and a 4-3 defense 
which is different from any of the 
past Fairmont teams," offered 
Sobolewski. "The unknown factors 
of what to specifically prepare for on 
both offense and defense gives us an 
additional concern. We will have to 
show a great deal of maturity as a 
team on Saturday in making the nec- 
essary adjustments as the game 
goes along. I think this will be a 
major factor in how we perform 
offensively and defensively," added 
the second year Eagle coach. 

The Qarion offense, which aver- 
aged 178.4 rushing yards per game 
and 188.2 passing yards per contest, 
has the potential to once again be 



explosive in 1984. Skill position re- 
turnees include junior quarterback 
Pat Carbol, senior runners Elton 
Brown and C^leoff Alexander and 
senior receivers Terry McFetridge, 
Bob Green, Scott Ickes and Bill 
Frohlich. Carbol, the Golden Eagles' 
signal caller the last two seasons, 
has completed 154 of 290 career 
tosses for 2,287 yards and 20 td's. 
Last year he hit on 118 of 221 aerials 
for 1,668 yards and 14 td's. His fav- 
orite target has been McFetridge, 
who has caught 93 career passes for 
1,860 yards and 19 td's. Latching 
onto 50 passes for 945 yards and 11 
td's last year, he returns as the top 
pass catcher. Injured however, in 
the pre-season, McFetridge is ques- 
tionable for the opener. Ickes (14 
catches-223 yards and three td's in 
1983) and Green (14 receptions-304 
yards in 1983) will likely share duties 
at both flanker and split end in the 
event that McFetridge is unable to 
play. Frohlich, entering his third 
year as the starting tight end, 
caught 11 aerials for 113 yards a 
year ago and is capably backed up 
by Jim Hahn. 
The 1984 running game will pair 

1981 and 1983 all-conference tailback 
Elton Brown and 1982 all-conference 
runner (Jeoff Alexander. Brown, a 
first team AP All-America choice 
last year, collected 1,214 yards on 
231 carries, including 11 td's. His 
2,181 rushing career rushing yards 
leave him only 598 yards away from 
Gary Frantz's all-time mark of 
2,778. Alexander, who was slowed in 
1983 by a pre-season illness, again 
enters the starting backfield, this 
time teamed with Brown. Alexander 
ran for 727 yards in seven games in 

1982 earning his all-conference 



status and a healthy year from both 
runners could produce a solid 1-2 
punch on the growid. The "0" line, 
which lost two important starters to 
graduation, will be anchored by 
talented center Jerry Dickson (Jr. 
Apollo-Kiski Area) , three-year start- 
ing guard Ken Ivy and tackle Jeff 
Jaworski. Joining the starters will 
be guard Jerry Fedell and tackle 
Todd Deluliis. "we're just looking to 
get our timing down right now and 
we're really sticking to the basics," 
added Sobolewski. 

The Clarion offense will be going 
against a quick, aggressive 
Fairmont defense. Using a 4-3 de- 
fense, the Falcons will have Chuck 
Sincel and Calvin Washington (63 
tackles-5 qb sacks in 1983) at defen- 
sive ends and Charlie Hall (59 
tackles in 1983) and Tom Kickler (29 
stops in 1983) at the tackle spots. 
Linebacking is the strong point 
where Barry White (92 tackles), 
Scott Williamson (110 stops) and 
L.D. Skarzinski anchor the defense. 
In the secondary Marty Guzzetta 
(three interceptions, 1983) and Vince 
Mitchell (2 thefts-1093) return at 
comers while Vaughn Butler (2 
intercepts) returns to his familiar 
frw safety spot. Jeff Wells is the 
only newcomer at strong safety. 
Although the defense gave up 209 
points in 10 games, it should be 
vastly improved and provide a stiff 
test for the Eagles' offense. 

Fairmont's offense has Larry 
Farrell back at quarterback, along 
with runners Brian Brown and 
Demetrius Rush and standout 
receiver Ed Coleman. Farrell, who 
passed for 249 yards and two td's 
against the Golden Eagles in the 1982 
opener, sat out 1983 but is talented 




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and ready to return. "He's a quality 
qb," conunented Sobolewski. Brown 
averaged 5.0 yards per carry in 1983 
gaining 939 yards on 186 carries. 
Rush, who gained 124 yards on 33 
carries a year ago, adds quality to 
the starting backfield. Freshman Ed 
Bryan is the third starting member 
of the Wing-T offense employed this 
season. "Their running game is 
sound and that creates opportunities 
for Farrell to pass," noted Sobolew- 
ski. When Farrell throws, Coleman 
is the favorite target. Coleman led 
the Falcons by catching 40 passes 
for 558 yards and three td's last sea- 
son. 6'7" tight end Joe Haas, who 
caught 20 aerials for 223 yards last 
year, figures to be the next favorite 
target. Offensively, Fairmont 
gained 327.1 yards of total offense 
per game in 1983 and certainly 
returns the talent to continue that in 
1984. 

Clarion's defense, led by middle 
guard Kevin Ewing, will be trying to 
stop the offensive firepower of the 
Falcons. Ewing had 139 tackles and 
eight sacks a year ago on his way to 
being selected as an HM All- 
America by AP. Alongside Ewing at 
the tackle spots will be John Hughes, 
who had 55 tackles and six sacks last 
season, and Dom Broglia, who had 
37 stops. The ends are well-manned 
by 1983 AP HM All-America Jon 
Haslett, who had 99 tackles and 17 
sacks in 1983 and Jim Trovato, who 
had 57 tackles and six sacks last 
year. The linebackers should be 
strong with Bob Jarosinski and 
Jerry Haslett back as starters. Jar- 
osinski had 57 tackles last season 
while Haslett chipped in 67 tackles. 
The secondary will have John Rice 
and Scott MacEwen back along with 
safeties Sam Barbush and John 
Hanna. Rice had 38 tackles last year 
vtiiile MacEwen led the defense with 
three thefts and 95 tackles. Bar- 
bush's 68 stops were a big contribu- 
Hon while Hanna is figuring to make 
his first start. The defense limited 
of^nents to 126.8 yards rushing and 
182 passing a year ago and those 
totals are expected to improve in 
1984. "We're expecting our defense 
to be more aggressive than last 
year," complimented Sobolewski. 
"They have the ability to turn the 
ball over to the offense in good field 
position and we're hoping we can 
establish that pattern throughout the 
season." 

Eric Fairbanks returns to the 
Eagles specialty game, having 
booted 34 of 36 extra points a year 
ago and becoming (3arion's second 
highest career kick-scorer last 
season totalling 116 points. 

"There are always so many ques- 
tions to be answered that it's hard to 
say how this opener shapes up," 
commented Sobolewski. "Fairmont 
will be ready however and we've got 
to make our team understand that 
fact and be ready for a real 
barnburner." 

CLARION NOTES: Qarion opens its 
home schedule with a non- 
conference game against 
Westminster on September 15 and it 
will be Parent's Day at Memorial 
Field. The PSAC-West schedule will 
open in two weeks at Shii^nsburg. 



RESEARCH PAPERS 



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The Fixx to rock stadium this Saturday 



By: Tim Slaper 

The international rock group "The 
Fixx" along with Andy Fraser, for- 
merly of "Free", are coming to 
Clarion to present their brand of 
rock next Saturday, Sept. 22 at 
C.U.P. stadium at 7 p.m. 

In 1983, The Fixx, with Cy Curnin 
(vocals), Adam Woods (drums), 
Jamie West-Oram (guitars), Rupert 
Greenall (keyboards), and Danny 
Brown (bass) succeeded with their 
blend of fine musicianship and 
intriguing lyrics, keeping their 
debut album. Shuttered Rooms on 
the country's charts for a full year 



while their second album. Reach 
ITie Beach, achieved platinum sta- 
tus and remained in the top 10 for 10 
weeks. 

Furthermore, such Fixx songs as 
"Saved By Zero," and "One Thing 
Leads to Another" (both top five 
hits), "Red Skies," and "Stand or 
Fall" received much air-play, as 
well as the videos for each of these 
songs. The Fixx are also selected to 
open on tour with The Police. 

The result of that, with the release 
this summer of their third album. 
Phantoms, produced once again by 
Rupert Hine, The Fixx have as- 
cended to the level of headliners on 



their current world tour. 

"Our first album," explains lead 
singer-lyricist Cy Curnin, "came 
from the fact that I spent a lot of 
time at home and wondered how 
many other people stayed home, 
locking themselves away with a TV 
set. Our second was about wallowing 
around in the demands of institu- 
tions and not really understanding 
the direction to go. The title 'Phan- 
toms' concerns people who don't 
communicate. You never really 
know them, but inside you can feel 
them destroying themselves." 

Opening for The Fixx is Andy 
Fraser, formerly of the rock-group 



"Free." He has written tunes for 
some of the best singers in popular 
music, including Joe Cockner, 
Frankie Miller and Robert Palmer, 
and he will also be performing music 
from his new solo album Branded. 

The east-coast leg of The 
Fix/ Andy Fraser tour brings them 
to the Western Pennsylvania area 
for three dates: Clarion, Shippens- 
burg, and finally, Penn State. 

Since the concert here at Clarion 
on Sept. 22 will be an outdoor per- 
formance, a lot more work is involv- 
ed in putting it together. According 
to the director of University Centers, 
Dave Tomeo, "With the tent and 



generator, the stage, the lights and 
the sound, preparation will have to 
begin Thursday to be done by Friday 
evening, and dismantling the entire 
set-up should take well into 
Sunday." Also, the extra equipment 
and personnel needed for an outdoor 
concert will push the overall cost to 
well past $29,000. Nevertheless, the 
performing groups should give 
everyone their money's worth. 

Finally, a reminder to all those 
attending the show: all tickets sold 
at the door are $10, and there will be 
a bottle search at the door so don't 
bring any alcoholic beverages to the 
show. 




VOL. 56 NO. 2 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, S«pt. 20, 1984 



CJUMMj (X»dMA-Wt^ ofy 9w^JlJ^^JiH)J^JU0u 





Jugglers provide entertainment for Activities Day onlookers. Participants had a good response to their promotions as 
freshmen and others bore the cool temperatures Sunday to find about campus organizations. Photo by Chuck Lizza 

Parking controversy explained 



By: Karen A. Bauer 



Parking your car on the Clarion 
campus may cause a few headaches 
this semester. 

The Public Safety Office sells 
parking permits to students every 
fall semester. Last year, 725 stickers 
were sold- However, this year the 
demand seemed to exceed the 
supply since a total of 871 stickers 
have been sold for 732 available 
student spaces. 

Initially, Public Safety stopped 
selling the stickers when they reach- 
ed the 800 mark. But, many students 
were still in need of permits so they 
formed a waiting list. This posed a 
problem, specially for commuter 
students. Since then, Public Safety 
has decided to go ahead and sell to 
all inter^ted students in hopes that 
it will not cause problems. 

Officer Postlewait, Director of 
Public Safety, realizes that the 
money collected from the sales is not 
profit to the Department, but is used 



to maintain the lots. He does feel it is 
unfair to accept the money from the 
students without them having a rea- 
sonable chance of getting a park- 
ing place. The problem is not expect- 
ed to be too severe, however, since 
most students do not park in the lots 
for a full eight-hour day. 

The Parking Committee, consist- 
ing of two faculty members, two 
staff members two administrators, 
and two students, will meet to dis- 
cuss some possible solutions should 
this continue to occur. Since the 
permits have already been sold, 
there is not much that can be done 
this year. Next year, if the problem 
persists, an alternative policy may 
be introduced. Some possible 
solutions may be to sell permits to 
commuters first, or to sell to upper 
classmen first. Possibly, students 
who live in the dorms and move their 
cars very infrequently, will be 
required to park in a lot other than 
the campus lots, such as the stadium 
lots. These suggestions are only pos- 
sible alternatives if the problem 



becomes worse in the coming years. 
In any case, this year will proceed 
strictly on a first come, first serve 
basis. 

Clarion tallies 
record enrollment 

A record 5,667 students are now 
enrolled at Clarion University, 
marking the highest enrollment in 
the history of the institution. The 
previous high mark came last year 
with 5,637 students. 

The enrollment figures for the 
start of the 1984-85 academic year, 
released by the University Friday 
morning, show increases in the num- 
ber of full-time undergraduate stu- 
dents, full and part-time graduate 
students, and full-time students at 
Clarion's Venango Campus in Oil 
Qty. University officials are expect- 
ing the enrollment figures to in- 
crease in coming weeks due to late 
enrollments. 

Clarion also saw an increase in the 
number of foreign students, with 149 
students from 39 countries. Malay- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Nostalgic ice cream shop 
to open downtown In '85 



By; Christine Minder 



If an old fashioned ice cream shop 
tickles your taste buds picture one 
opening up on 612 Main Street in 
either January or February of 1985, 
which is delightfully going to be 
called, "Clancy Ann's." 

Just a stroll in will bring nostalgia 
flowing; the nickledeon piano play- 



ing its good old tunes, the soda clerk 
filling the orders at the soda foun- 
tain, and people of all ages chatting 
while enjoying their ice cream. 

Mr. Paul Weaver, the owner, 
hopes it will be like walking into 
another world, a fantasy world of 
old. This old-time effect is enhanced 
by the iron clad tables and matching 
(Continued on page 2) 




Students check out the construction of the new Ice cream shop. Owner Paul 
Weaver hopes to open the old fashioned shop in early 1985. 

Photo by Jeff Newpher 



ON THE INSIDE 



Merchants' winners 2 

Campaign '84 3 

Becht renovations 3 

Young Republicans 4 



Chandler 10 

Only at Clarion 12 

Tennis 13 

Football 16 



2— CLARION'§,CALL, Thursday. Sept. 20, 1984 




CAS coordinator addresses campus 



CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984—3 



So you're getting this semester off to a good start, right? You're 
reading all those assigned chapters for every class, getting to every class, 
getting involved with campus activities, ri^t? And since you're doing all 
this studying, you're not going out drinking and spending money too 
oft0i so you can pay the landkxd and/a- tfie phone bills. Very commend- 
able actions. 

However, may I suggest an addition to your list of virtues - manners. 

Now, Fm not talking pinky-up-with-your-eating-utensils type man- 
ners. I mean the garden variety manners we were d\\ taught in grade 
school. Remember the power of saying "Hello", "Please", "Thank you", 
"excuse me", and "Have a nice day." We could move mountains, or at 
least the mean old first grade teacher, just by reciting those pleasantries 
half-heartedly. 

Please, don't everyone take offense here. Fm addressing my plea for 
manners to the princess who spent 25 minutes in the only warm shower 
during "rush hour;" to the guy who belches loud enough to be mistaken 
fcM- a sonic boom - I mean Chandler's bad enough, but a human p.a. 
system is in poor taste, and to the sweeties who act like they haven't 
seen their best friend in weeks just because the best friend is close to the 
serving line in Chandler instead of out by the mail box. 

There are over 5,000 students on this campus, people are living in 
temporary housing and there aren't enough parking places for the com- 
muting students - things could get pretty nasty and ugly around here if 
folks dc»i't start being a bit more courteous to one another. 

It blows my mind to hear people in an academic environment using 
repulsive, four-letter words to express their satisfaction and happiness! 

I freely admit that Fm no authority, nor the best example of the 
world's pleasantries, but a friend of mine, who has just taken on the awe- 
some job of being an R.A., was concerned about somebody else being 
bothered by a fellow dormmate's noise. Okay, he's getting free room and 
board to be sensitive to noise, but he's no mother hen, and I thou^t his 
concern was nice. 

So if I may in closing pass on some advice from my speech teacher - 
make good eye contact, smile and take the group with charm! 

Thank you. Have a nice day. 
Karen E. Hale 




Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Editorin-Chlef KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Features Editor MICHELE LaTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK. 

Photography Editor CHUCK LI22A 



Ad Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

. Circulation Manager DENISE SHEEKY 

Advisor ART BARLOW 

Consulting Editor THERESA WAIDA 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising RatM: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Per Agate Line S .34 



Mail Subscription Rates: 

Per Semester S5 

Per Academic Year S8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 



To the Editor, 

Please allow me to use this space 
to address the student body on 
liehalf of the Commonwealth As- 
sociation of Students. CAS is a stu- 
dent group dedicated to protecting 
the rights of students in Pennsyl- 
vania's 14 state-owned universities. 
During the next few weeks we will be 
conducting a voter registration 
drive. 

Who should register to vote? Ev- 
ery United States citizen 18 years or 
older should register. As U.S. citi- 
zens, we have a special privilege 
shared by few other people of the 
world. We can choose those who will 
lead our government and make our 
laws. If you are registered already, 
you may have to re-register. Have 
you failed to vote in the past two 
years? Have you moved since your 
registration? If so, you must regis- 
ter again to have your vote count in 
the November election. 

Why should you register in Clar- 
ion? The students of C.U.P. should 
vote as a block to show unity. After 
all, if every eligible student at this 
school registered and voted in 
Clarion, they would have controlling 
numbers on the local ballot. Other 
colleges have put students on their 
local city councils; if we worked to- 
gether, so could we. 

Clarion has a much greater effect 
on your life during your college 

Ice Cream... 

(Continued from Page 1) 

chairs. 

Chocolate, vanilla, strawberry 
and all of the favorite flavors can be 
found at "Clancy Ann's" ice cream 
counter along with pop, soda, and 
cold sandwiches. A special added at- 
traction will be a gift area which will 
sell buttons and various knick- 
knacks. 

Mr. Weaver decided to open up an 
ice cream shop because it is a step 
different than any of the other stores 
in downtown Clarion. 

Just the painted colors of the 
shop's facade of yellow and brown 
let the town of Clarion know that 
there is something special, almost 
magical about "Clancy Ann's." 
When Weaver was asked why he 
painted the building those colors, he 
replied they just reminded him of ice 
cream. 

The name "Clancy Ann's" was 
Weaver's daughter's childhood nick- 
name. 

"Clancy Ann's" will give Clarion a 
chance to relive the olden days and 
make wonderful new memories. 

Enrollment... 

(Continued from Page 1) 
sia has the largest representation 
with 31 students. 

Admission applications for the 
current academic year were also re- 
ceived at record levels and close to 
1,000 of the applications were re- 
jected due to academic reasons, ac- 
cording to John Shropshire, dean of 
admissions and registrar. 

"We're seeing a better quality in 
our students," says Shropshire. 
"There are also a larger number of 
high school valedictorians in the 
freshman class and we admitted our 
largest number of National Merit 
Finalists this year." 

Enrollment in SSHE universities 
totaled 81,413 for the 1983-84 school 
year. Full time 65,%5, and part- 
time, 15,458. 



years than your home community 
does. In your four years of coUege, 
you will spend 36 out of 48 months in 
Clarion, obeying Clarion's city 
ordinances, governed by Clarion's 
legislators, and paying tuition set by 
those legislators. Your vote can be 
leverage against rising tuition. 

It's easy to vote in Clarion. 
Campus students vote in Marwick- 
Boyd lobby. That's not so far, is it? 
Most other students vote either at 
the Courthouse or the Fire Hall. If 
you live at the Manor you vote in 
Strattanville, but CAS is attempting 
to provide transportation, as has 



been done in past years. 

If you're registered at home and 
wish to change your registration to 
Qarion, just fill out a new form and 
don't send an absentee ballot form. 
Your old registration will be cancel- 
led automatically. 

CAS would like to register at least 
50 voters by Oct. 9. Forms are avail- 
able at the CAS office, 114 Harvey 
Hall. All you have to do is fill one out, 
then vote in November. Don't ignore 
your responsibility; your future is at 
stake. 

Netta M. Benamati 
Coordinator, Clarion CAS 



Merchants pick prize winners 



The winners of the Main Street 
Merchants Association Activities 
Day drawings were: Francis Bouers 
$25 gift certificate from ApoUodorus 
Music; Janice Manula, $10 gift cer- 
tificate from Book Noook; Angela 
Williams, County Seat prize winner; 
Regina Mitchell, $20 gift certificate 
from Uppers & Downers; Andrew 
Noon, Tana Shear prize winner; 
Chris Schartuer and Rosemary Au- 
erswald both $10 gift certificate win- 
ners from the Dorian Shop. 

Also Janet Williams, $20 gift cer- 
tificate from Crooks Clothing; 
Gretchen Goodwin, $20 gift certifi- 
cate from Weins; Kevin Rehar, 
prize winner for James Jewelers; 
Kim Lees, prize winner for Don 
Miller Shoes; Nanette Allhouse, $10 
gift certificate from Space's Servi- 
star Hardware; Zulfi-Bih Zakaria, 
winner of gift certificate from Mc- 
Donalds. 

Other wirmers were Ann Merkel, 
winner of Kentucky Fried Chicken 
gift certificate; Jan Chadwick, 
Town and Country Qeaners; Pa- 
trice D'Eramo, Children's Shop gift 
certificate; Thomas Wells, enamel- 
ed Hallmark pen from Cardtowne; 
John Summerville, AKG Head- 
phones from Hawk Electronics; 
Lucy Jones, prize winner from the 
Western Shed and Deanna Schma- 
der, prize winner from Paul A. Wea- 
ver Jewelers. 



And, Lean Greenawalt, prize win- 
ner from Shear Shed; Robyn Scott, 
two free cuts from Coke's Cutters; 
Paula Schultz, two free cuts from 
Guys and Dolls Hairstyling; Cindy 
Mahn, $15 gift certificate from the 
Autumn Leaf; Chris Iden, large 
pizza from Fox's Pizza Den; Arnold 
Crosson, case of pop from Klingen- 
smith's Drug Store; Dina Smith, 
winner of a dozen roses from Wil- 
shire's. 

Final winners include Lori Quinn, 
prize winner from Knot and Plant; 
Douglas Andrews, prize winner 
from Wendy's; Marie Nagel and 
Don Gossar each winning a $10 gift 
certificate to ApoUodorus Music 
from WMKX, Magic % Radio; Tim 
Powell, gift certificate from 
Smitty's Golden Dawn; Trudy Staj- 
dujar, prize winner from McNutt 
Jewelers and Scott Tanner, $20 gift 
certificate from the Tree House. 

Prize winners must contact the 
store from which their prize was 
gjven. to receiyi? gift. ..^ . < 



JOB SEMINAR 

Tuesday, Sept. 25 

Knowing what to expect in a job 
interview can make it a less 
stressful event. Discussion will 
focus on how you can prepare for 
a job interview. A mock inter- 
view will be presented. 





THAT y^HATS-m-tTAME 
n ST/ IL RWhUHQ. 



■ // / ' ■ ' I 




By: Michael J. Downing 

Walter Mondale, Democratic 
presidential nominee for 1984 has 
vowed to "lead this nation on a ren- 
aissance of learning, of education, of 
science." 

Mondale made that pledge July 2 
in Minneapolis at the annual Na- 
tional Education Association (NEA) 
Representative Assembly. 

At first glance it appears as 
though Mondale is telling the teach- 
ers exactly what they want to hear. 
If we end our evaluation at this 
point, we may conclude that 
Mondale simply travels around the 
country telling different interest 
groups exactly what he wants them 
to hear. 

However, if we continue to watch 
Mondale, we see him, two and a half 
weeks later, repeat that pledge. This 
time as he accepts the Democratic 
presidential nomination in San 
Francisco. 

•Riis leads me to believe that Mon- 
dale truly is an advocate for better 
schools and excellence in education. 

John Martin, a political science 
professor at the University of Maine, 
was present for Mondale's 
acceptance speech. "It's obvious," 
says Martin, "that, in Walter Mon- 
dale we have a candidate for Pres- 
ident who is really committed to 
higher education." 

The views from different insti- 
tutions across the country are much" 
the same. 

Dean J. Bergwwi, an associate 



professor of history at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, is particular- 
ly worried about the impact of fed- 
eral student aid cuts. "The only way 
many students can afford to go to 
college now is to work 40 hours a 
week," says Bergeron. Academic 
work suffers when students have to 
work full-time. It's the same lack of 
sensitivity to higher education we've 
seen over the last four years," notes 
Bergeron, "I feel that higher educa- 
tion will become elitist." But Ber- 
geron is hopeful that there will be a 
change come November. 

Speaking as a senior involved in 
our nation's system of higher edu- 
cation for the past three years, I 
have reached some conclusions 
solely on what I have experienced. 

My student loan was cut off after 
my freshman year, two years after 
Reagan was elected into office. 
Many of my friends who started to 
attend college also lost their loans 
and other financial aid. 

It angers me to know that this 
country was made strong through 
the excellence of our educational 
system and now it is being destroyed 
by obsolete projects like the B-1 
bomber. 

We need to get qualified people 
into our nation's institutions. Walter 
Mondale has promised to do this. We 
can only wait. . .and hope. 

Hie views expressed in this 
cotumn are strictly the opinions 
of the rqtorter. They do not nec- 
essarily reflect the opinions of 
the publication itself.) 



Becht Hall renovated 



By: Nancy Umbaugh 



The rewiring in Becht Hall was 
completed a few years ago and now 
a second task is t)eing undertaken. 
Starting in January, the plumbing in 
Becht will be newly standardized 
and updated. The whole project is 
scheduled for completion at the end 
of next summer. 

Dr. Nair, Vice President of Stu- 
dent Affairs, says, "The renovation 
was to be done in the summer, but 
Harrisburg said that summer wasn't 
enough time to get a contractor in 
and out because of the size of the 
IMToject." 

When Nair Hall was opened, Becht 
Hall was to he abandoned, but such a 
high demand for women's housing 
kept the doors of Becht open. This 
demand has put a strain on the build- 
ing over the last 15 years. Nair ex- 
plains, "Maintenance began to have 
problems with the plumbing . . .say- 
ing that things couldn't be held to- 
gether much longer." Also, 
residents' complaints began to ac- 
cumulate. 

Our college administration made 
the conclusive decision that Becht 
Hall should finally be repaired. 

The project will not affect the 
whole campus. If at all, the women's 
housing will be slightly upturned. 

Mr. Barry Morris, Housing Su- 
pervisor, says, "We have made 
adjustments to temporarily house 
these girls if problems do arise, but 
we don't anticipate any at this 
time." 

Turn over between semesters pro- 
vides extra on-campus housing be- 
cause many students graduate. 



withdraw, or move off campus. In 
doing so, extra housing becomes 
available. 

Mr. Morris also says that these 
students will receive "special prior- 
ity": They will be permitted to sign- 
up on the second day of housing sign- 
ups, instead of the normal third or 
fourth day. 

Responsibility for acquiring the 
contractor lies in the hands of the 
Department of General Services in 
Harrisburg. Even though the bids 
haven't been opened, a budget of 
$125,000 has been allocated. 

Dr. Nair says that the money for 
the project is alloted for in the Dorm 
Residence Fund, "which was estab- 
lished under the old system that a 
percentage of hall rent goes into a 
fund which is then sent to Harris- 
burg and then is available for 
repairs, such as this, on Residence 
Halls." 

Since the project's completion is 
scheduled for next summer's end, 
Becht Hall will return as a housing 
facility next fall. 




This new satellite dish was Installed during the summer months at Becker Hall. 



Photo by Mike Downing 



Becker's new satellite dish 
proves to be a good investment 



By: Mike Callaghan 



A 16-foot mesh Paraclips Satellite 
Dish was installed on top of Becker 
Hall in August, by the School of Com- 
munications, so that it is possible for 
WCUC to pick up Mutual Radio. 

This satellite dish, which receives 
Mutual Radio, or two-way radio, has 
many advantages which were ex- 
plained by Dr. Henry Fueg of the 
Communications Department. 

Dr. Fueg stated, "In the past, 



WCUC, an on-campus radio station, 
has had to call Franklin, Pa. for 
Mutual News and then broadcast the 
news live through telephone lines." 

Dr. Fueg further explains, "This 
created problems such as high costs 
for telephone calls, distorted 
signals, and unclear sound, but with 
the new satellite dish these problems 
have all been eliminated." 

With the new satellite dish it will 
no longer be necessary to call 



Franklin, and it would also create 
stronger signals and clearer sound. 
Without the satellite dish it would 
only he possible to receive one 
chaimel radio, but with the dish it is 
possible for WCUC to pick up two 
channel radio, AM and FM, in ster- 
eo. 

In Dr. Fueg's words, "The satel- 
lite dish has brought WCUC from an 
automated juke box to an honest-to- 
goodness radio station." 



Woman hit near Wilkinson 



By; Mike DiLeo 



Clarion's Boro police are still 
investigating an accident that oc- 
curred just oiitside of Wilkinson 
Hall during the early afternoon of 
Sept. 6. 

Police say a 1977 Buick driven by 
Ruthell Peterson, of Clarion, was 



Library Hours 

Additional study hall hours have 
been added to the Carlson Library 
schedule this term. The library will 
be open on a study hall t>asis from 10 
p.m. to midnight Sunday through 
Tliursday. The full schedule of hours 
is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m.- 
Midnight* 

Friday: 8a.m.-5p.m. 

Saturday: lla.m.-5p.m. 

Sunday: 2p.m.-Midnight* 

♦Study Hall Only 10 p.m.-Midnight 
(Service points closed) 



westbound when she struck Ruth 
Heitzenrater also of Clarion. 

Heitzenrater was knocked to the 
pavement and sustained severe in- 
juries. She was then rushed by am- 
bulance to Clarion's Osteopathic 
Community Hospital where she was 
placed in intensive care. 

A traffic sign was damaged when 
Peterson swerved to avoid the 
pedestrian. The investigation to date 
includes no violations against Pe- 
terson, however, the investigation 
continues. 

Boro police have questioned sever- 



al witnesses and are requesting that 
people who may have seen the acci- 
dent please come forward and help 
them in their investigation. 

If both a parent and an older 
sibling smoke, the chances of a 
teenager picking up the habit are 
almost one in five, is tlie news 
from the American Cancer So- 
ciety. Teenagers from homes 
where neither parents nor siblings 
smoke stand a less than one in 20 
chance of turning to cigarettes. 




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Rent a Video Recorder (free film included) 

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1 St: Mary Ann Navotry 
2nd: $25 Gina Hileman 
Srd: $ 1 Joseph Newtz 
4th: $5 Tanya Elan 



5th: $5 Robin Hockenberry 
6th: $5 Michele Given 
7th: $5 Michele Dubarch 
8th: $5 Brenda Haver 



Must be used by Sept. 30, 1 984 






(Next to Post Office) 

Wliere Students are always welcome 
whether to buy or to browse. 



has a complete line of cards, gifts, dolls, plush animals, 
glassware, china, and candles - Come see us Soon! 



4— CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Piu, Thuraday, Sept. 20, 1964 

Attorney Rendell 
endorses Wachob 



By: Michael J. Downing 

State Representative Bill Wachob, 
Democratic candidate for U.S. Con- 
gress in the 23rd District, held a 
noon press conference on crime with 
the District Attorney of Philadel- 
phia, Edward Rendell. The confer- 
ence was held at the Jefferson 
County Courthouse in Brookville on 

Sept. 11, 1984. 

Rendell, a national authority on 
criminal justice issues, endorses 
Wachob in his bid for U.S. Congress. 

After Rendell's endorsement, 
Wachob discussed his position on 
crime and criminal justice in the 
23rd District. Wachob said, "It is 
ironic that we have heard tough 
words and tough rhetoric about 
crime, because we have not had 
tough action or tough committment 
by the federal government to fight 
crime in recent years Beyond those 
tough words there is the reality — 
crime maims and kills people and 
destroys lives. Crime is especially 



frightening and threatening to 
vulnerable, helpless people like 
senior citizens, children and women. 
During the 1970's violent crime in- 
creased dramatically, not just in big 
cities, but in rural areas as well." 

He continued, "In 1982 the budgets 
of the FBI, the Dept. of Immigration 
and Naturalization, and the U.S. At- 
torneys and Federal Marshalls were 
all cut. As a result, there are now 
fewer FBI agents than there were in 
1981. There are 120 more federal 
judges, but no more prosecutors and 
fewer investigators and marshalls." 

As a specific remedy, Wachob 
wishes to return the budgets of the 
aforementioned departments to 
their pre-1982 levels. Also he would 
strive to funnel money from the de- 
fense budget into the law enforce- 
ment budgets of local communities. 
He would also try to improve com- 
munication between federal, state, 
and local law enforcement authori- 
ties. 



Faculty member needed 
for Center Board vacancy 



By; Jacqueline J. Root 



A C.U.P faculty member is needed 
to fill a vacancy on Center Board's 
executive board due to the resigna- 
tion of Ron Schlecht, who moved to 
Clarion's Venango Campus. 

Center Board is the administra- 
tive organization responsible for de- 
veloping and scheduling social 
events for all Qarion University stu- 
dents. Currently there are five 
faculty members on the executive 
board and a sixth person is desired. 

The duties of a faculty member of 
C.B. would include attending weekly 
meetings held every Wednesday at 4 
p.m. At these meetings proposed 
campus events are discussed and 
voted on. Optional duties include be- 
coming a member of one of Center 
Board's various committees. "The 
advantages to being on one of the 
committees is that the faculty has 
the opportunity to review all of the 
literature available to the individual 
committees and help decide which 



ones are the best to bring in front of 
the executive board for voting," 
Center Board's advisor Dave Tomeo 
stated. 

Dr. Mary Hardwick, one of C.B.'s 
current faculty members, comment- 
ed on the advantages of being 
involved on the executive board, "A 
faculty member can use their talent, 
education, and experience to assist 
the student decision-making process 
in trying to bring quality educational 
and entertaining experiences to our 
campus." 

At this time there have been no 
applications submitted for consid- 
eration. If any member of the facul- 
ty is interested in applying for the 
position, they can pick up an appli- 
cation in Room 108 Reimer or con- 
tact Mary at 226-4158 or Dave 
Tomeo at 2^2312 for more informa- 
tion. 



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District Attomty Ed Rendall, left, from Philadelphia, endorses congressional candidate Bill Wachob In Brookville. 

Photo by Mike Downing 

Young Republicans develop 
anew role in politics • 



By: Mike Saraka 



TTie Republican Party developed a 
key role for youth at last month's 
Republican Convention in Dallas. 

The signs, banners, demonstra- 
tions, and chants of "four more 
years" were the work of a group of 
2,000 young volunteers. On the night 
of President Reagan's renomination, 
about 1,000 young people jammed 
the convention floor, waving 
banners and signs. They snaked 
through the delegates for exactly 15 
minutes, and then left the floor when 
signaled. 

The huge delegation of youth lent 
some moments of spontaneity to the 
convention. They were responsible 
for an entertaining group of "Fritz- 
busters" commandos and a group 
called "Coneheads for Reagan." 
TTiis was important for some much- 
needed visibility in the party. 

Youth leaders attribute this new 
visibility to growing conservatism 
among college students. 

"People my age have only seen 
two administrations, the Carter 
failure and the Reagan success," ex- 
plains Patrick Mizell, 20, the Texas 
state coordinator for the Reagan- 
Bush campaign. 



"I think the man has done mir- 
acles," adds Carey Ewing of the 
Young Republicans. "I'm better off 
now than I was four years ago. I 
believe in hard work. I don't believe 
in getting something for nothing." 

The party's youth wing plans to 
campaign at 150 campuses in swing 
states to make sure people don't 
change their minds. 

"We're going out there and push 
our case," says Jack Abramoff, 
head of the College Republicans. 
The College Republicans hope to 
register about 200,000 youths before 
the election. 

Abramoff is also behind the 
"Fritzbusters" campaign, touring 
campuses this fall. He has $25,000 
worth of buttons, t-shirts, and bump- 
er-stickers to take with him. "The 
sales were very profitable at the 
Dallas convention," Abramoff says. 
Ah-eady an ambulance has been 
donated to transport the four Fritz- 
busters, and a song written to the 
"Ghostbusters" melody. There is 
even talk of a video being made for 
M-TV in the future. 

Reagan youth leaders will also 
stage a "Liberation Day" on 
October 25, having American stu- 
dents who were in Grenada when it 



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was invaded, speak at the campus- 
es. 

Many young delegates were spec- 
ulating who the 1988 GOP presiden- 
tial nominee might be. Rep Jack 
Kemp was a favorite among many 
delegates. 

At a convention youth rally he 
urged young people to provide "A 
leader who will take this party into 
the next century." "We are the 
party of these people's future," said 
Abramoff later. They went on to 
criticize the Democrats and their 
"liberal establishment" policies. 

Health bill 
introduced 

By: Jonathan Shimmons 

State Representative Bill Wachob 
has announced he is introducing leg- 
islation to provide government fund- 
ed health screenings for hundreds of 
former employees and their famil- 
ies. The employees from the Drake 
Chemical factory in Lock Haven 
were exposed to BNA (Beta Naph- 
thylamine), a chemical which 
causes bladder cancer. 

These families have been waiting 
for over a year for the Environmen- 
tal Protection Agency (EPA) or the 
Federal Center for Disease Control 
(CDC) to provide a potentially life 
saving health screening. Many of the 
workers have been unemployed 
since the Drake plant closed in 1981 
and cannot afford to pay for the ex- 
pensive screening themselves. 

The legislation orders the State 
Department of Health to begin an 
ongoing health screening program 
for former workers, their spouses, 
and nearby residents of the Drake 
site. 



I 






I 




CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984—5 



Clarion senior wins 
accounting award 



Stephen A. Turchick, a senior ac- 
counting major has been awarded a 
$2,500 scholarship by the Arthur H. 
Carter Scholarship Fund. The Fund 
is administered by the Carter Schol- 
arship Committee of the American 
Accounting Association. 

Each year the committee receives 
over 200 applications nationally. The 
number of applicants from a given 
school are restricted to one percent 
of the accounting majors graduated 



the previous year, but not less than 
one nomination per school. Approxi- 
mately 50 students are selected each 
year to receive $2,500 each. 

Turchick and a Penn State student 
are the only 1984 recipients from 
Pennsylvania. This is the second 
year in a row that a Clarion Univer- 
sity acconting major was selected. 
The other Pennsylvania Universities 
represented last year were Penn 
State and Carnegie-Mellon. 



Homecoming plans 
well underway 



By: Mylene Samek 



St«ven Turchick, right, Is awarded scholarship check by Dr. Pineno of the accounting department. Photo by Chuck Lizza 

Shumaker studied Stevenson 
during summer seminar 



By: Susan Ohler 



A Clarion University English pro- 
fessor, Dr. Ronald Shumaker, re- 
ceived a grant from the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities which 
allowed him to travel to the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico in Albuquer- 
que, N.M. this past summer. 

Dr. Shumaker was one of the 12 
college teachers from all fields of 
humanities chosen to attend the 
eight-week, summer seminar on Ro- 
mantic Literary Theater. Each 
participant took part in a group 
study of the topic of the seminar and 
also did his own research project. 



Dr, Shumaka-'s research project 
concerned the late novels of Robert 
Louis Stevenson. 

The National Endowment for the 
Humanities is a federal agency de- 
signed to enhance the study and 
teaching of the humanities in the 
United States. Beside providing a 
program for college and high school 
teachers, the Endowment has three 
divisions which sponsor research, 
curriculum development and institu- 
tional programs in the field of hu- 
manities. 

When one is awarded the grant, 
the expenses of institutional study 
and research at the seminar are 



paid by the grant. The recipient also 
is given a stipend to cover all other 
expenses. 

This is the second time Dr. Shu- 
maker has received this grant. The 
first was in 1979 allowing him to 
study at Standford University in 
California. 

Dr. Shumaker teaches Victorian 
Literature and Linguistics at Clar- 
ion. 
I 



Plans are well underway at Clar- 
ion University for Homecoming '84. 
The Clarion community will come 
alive Oct. 7-14 with its festival theme 
"Autumn Art Spectacular." As in 
past years it looks to be quite an 
exciting week for both the college 
students and the community mem- 
bers. 

The campus' contribution to the 
festival is Homecoming on Satur- 
day, Oct. 13, which will feature the 
ALF parade, the Clarion University 
football game against lUP, and the 
crowning of Clarion's homecoming 
queen by Cindy Juback, Homecom- 
ing Queein of 1983. 

Any student wishing to participate 
as part of the homecoming court 
must submit a 5x7 picture of herself 
and fill out an application and return 
it no later than Friday, Sept. 28 at 
4:30 to 1(» Reimer Center. Girls can 
either be sponsored by an organiza- 
tion or run independently, in which 
case 25 signatures are required on a 
petition. 

Voting will be conducted by the 
entire student body, and three 
seniors, two juniors, two sopho- 



mores, and two freshmen will be 
chosen for the court. Two remaining 
girls from Clarion's branch campus 
will be chosen to represent Venango 
Campus. Voting will be held on 
Monday, Oct. 1 in Chandler from 10-2 
and 4-6 and in Carlson Wood St. 
entrance from 2-4 and 6-9. Tuesday, 
Oct. 2 elections will be held from 10-2 
in Cliandler and 2-4 in Carlson. 

"The Clarion University Organi- 
zations are once again getting in- 
volved in floats this year," says 
Carolyn Starcher, Special Events 
Chairperson. She is busy meeting 
with organizations every Thursday 
at 5 p.m. discussing flat beds, build- 
ing sites, and rules and regulations. 
She predicts about 10 or 12 organiza- 
tions to participate in the parade. 
The float designs will emphasize a 
return to nature, and judging stresses 
as many natural resources be used 
as possible. 

Competition categories include: 
Originality, Relation to Theme, 
Workmanship, and General Appear- 
ance. The three prize groups are 
$200, $125, and $75 for first, second 
and third place respectively. 

Applications for float entries are 
also due Friday, Sept. 28. 



Labor Day fete 
has second success 



By: Ken Ream 



For the second consecutive year 
Clarion University Broadcasting 
TV-5 served as a local affiliate for 
the Muscular Dystrophy Asso- 
ciation's Jerry Lewis Latx)r Day 
Telethon, helping to raise $10,007 
locally for the charity. The 21 »^ horn- 
telethon featured hourly local seg- 
ments broadcast from Jamesway 
by hosts John Williams. Ron Syl- 
vester, and Sherry Reed, along with 
the Nationally broadcast segments 
from Las Vegas. 

According to Dave Adezio, Station 
Manager at TV-5, this year's tele- 
thon went extremely well thanks to a 
great amount of support from local 
businesses and individuals. Adezio 
also feels several pieces of new 
equipment made available to TV-5, 
such as the new satellite receiving 
dish at Becker Hall, made this 



year's broadcast run smoother than 
last year's. 

Of the $10,007 raised this year in 
Qarion County for MDA, $1,832 was 
raised during the telethon. The fact 
that this year's local total was less 
than last year's does not disappoint 
Adezio. He notes the difference can 
be attributed to a drop in the pro- 
ceeds from one fund-raising activity 
and that there, was actually more 
individual contributions this year. 



Adezio explains that most of the 
money raised locally for MDA will 
actually be used for local victims of 
Muscular Dystrophy and related 
muscular diseases. He notes that 
enough money was raised during the 
telethon to purchase roughly two 
wheelchairs, "which couldn't have 
been purchased l)efore," making the 
efforts "definitely worthwhile." 





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8-CLARION'S CALL, Clarion. Pa, Thursday. Sept. 20, 1964 



Borough police report campus news 



Borough police are investigating 
two assaults in which the victims 
were young females. Both assaults 
took place during one half hour be- 
tween midnight and 12:30 a.m., Sat- 
urday, Sept. 15. In the first assault 
two female CUP students reported 
they were accosted on 6th Avenue 
near Madison Road. The actor 
grabbed one of the victims and 
began pulling her between two build- 
ings. The victim was knocked to the 
ground and a struggle took place. 
TTie victim escaped without serious 
injury and the attacker fled east on 
Liberty Street. 

The second incident took place in 
the Presbyterian Church parking lot 
on Weaver Place between Wood 
Street and Church Road. Once again 
the actor attacked two female CUP 
students, selected one, knocked her 
to the ground where he attempted a 
sexual assault. Both victims 
struggled with the attacker who fled 
west on Church Road. Again the 



victim escaped without serioud 
injury. Boroi^ police consider both 
assaults to have been made by the 
same individual. In both cases two 
women walking were attacked, one 
was selected as a primary victim 
and the other was ignored. The at- 
tacker was described as white male, 
20-25 years of age, dark hair, dark 
mustache, approximately 5'8" to 6' 
tall, lean muscular build, dressed in 
a white shirt and blue jeans. The 
actor is believed to have been 
running on Liberty and Wood 
Streets and Church Road and 
possibly on 8th Avenue. Borough 
police believe that several persons 
may have seen the assaults and are 
urgently requesting any one with 
any information contact the police at 
2^9140. Young ladies are cautioned 
to be extremely careful during the 
evening hours. Police request that 
anyone observing a struggle, 
hearing screams, or observing 
suspicious persons or vehicles, 



contact the police immediately. 

At 12:55 a.m. on Sept. 15 officers 
were called to what appeared to be a 
fight at 5th and Main St. Upon ar- 
rival officers found five females 
trying to prevent a friend from driv- 
ing. Cited for public drunkenness 
was Sheila D. Polum, age 28 of 
Butler, Pa. 

Vandalism was reported to 
Borough Police by Noreen O'Hara of 
S. 4th Ave., where unknown persons 
threw eggs on her porch. 

At 3 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16, 
officers cited Randall Schultheis, 
age 19 of Franklin and Thomas W. 
Christian also 19 of Philadelphia for 
minor's consuming. Anthony J. 
Layner, 19 of Philadelphia and 
Steven L. Bump, 18, of Clarion were 
also cited. 

Vandalism by unknown persons 
was reported to a parked police 
vehicle on Sept. 17. Vandalism was 
in the form of paint thrown onto the 
vehicle. 



Congressman's new amendment 
aims to increase student pressure 



Rep. Gerald Solomon, author of 
the law that denies federal aid to stu- 
dents who refuse to register for the 
draft, says he may soon introduce a 
new law to apply even more 
pressure on students to sign up with 
Selective Service. 

The measure aims to punish 
schools that set up special funds to 
support students who lose federal 
aid because they refuse to register 
with Selective Service. 

"My impression is Congressman 
Solomon would be encouraging 
schools' attention to concurment 
with the Solomon amendment, 
which is the intent of Congress and 
the U.S. law," says Jeff Gleason, a 
Solomon aide. 

There is no evidence any schools 
actually have set up student support 
funds, but Gleason claims "some 
have siad that's what they intend to 



do." 

Harvard, Northwestern, Swarth- 
more and Yale universities did an- 
nounce plans to give private aid to 
students who can't get federal aid, 
regardless of the reason. 

Solomon's new amendment would 
cut off funds to medical, dental, 
allied and other health profession 
schools that help non-registrants. 
Those funds currently are awarded 
under Title VII of the Public Health 
Services Act. 

Health educators, like aid admin- 
istrators in 1982, are lobbying to 
alter the amendment before it 
reaches the House, claiming it's not 
the job of schools to force student 
compliance with Selective Service 
laws. 

"We don't object to the underlying 
premise that students must register 
for the draft to get student aid, but it 



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is quite another thing to expect the 
health professions schools to do the 
job of the Selective Service," said 
Marty Liggett of the American As- 
sociation of Dental Schools (AADS) 
in an interview with Higher Educa- 
tion Daily. 

The American Council on Educa- 
tion and the National Association of 
Land Grant Colleges have joined 
AADS to change the amendment 
while the other education and pro- 
fessional groups are withholftg 
official reaction. 

Even though 98 percent of the 
eligible men have already complied 
with the draft laws, "It's a question 
of principle," insists Gleason of 
Solomon's office. "Even if a large 
portion of people are abiding by the 
law, you still want full compliance." 

The illegal activity of a few stu- 
dents isn't fair to those who do 
register or to colleges and universi- 
ties which abide by the law, he con- 
tends. 

As written, the amendment denies 
grants and contracts to schools 
which refuse to comply, Gleason 
says, and will affect only those 
schools. 

"Remember, he (Solomon) is not 
sure he'll even offer the amend- 
ment," he adds. "He'll decide before 
the House session begins." 








c 



FOR JUST 

$7.50 

CALL 

226-2380 



John Andtrson will spMk at Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on Monday, Oct. 1, at 
8:15 p.m. Tho program Is fr««. 



Students face fewer 
federal aid dollars 



Even with 00 further budget cuts, 
more students could be chasing 
fewer aid dollars during a second 
Reagan term of the administration 
achieves the goals set out in a re- 
cently-released budget document. 

While the document, prepared by 
the Office of Managemrat and Bud- 
get (0MB), predicts no actual cuts 
in federal aid, it also suggests the 
administration will ask for no aid 
increases and forecasts inflation will 
reduce existing programs by as 
much as 30 percent by 1980. 
much as 30 percent by 1989. 

"The changes are due primarily to 
inflation," says Barry White, 0MB 
iMidget examiner. "We don't antici- 
pate any policy changes." 

The document outlines a drop in 
"constant dollars" (1985 dollars 
cheapened by inflation through 1989) 
spent on student aid in a projection 
of the 1989 budget. 

Prepared last winter, the 
document doesn't reflect more 
recent negotiations with Congress 
that tacked $2 billion on to the pres- 
ident's proposed education budget. 
White stresses. 

Even with the inevitable compro- 
mises to come in the budget process, 
the Senate's proposed 1985 education 
budget of $8 billion and the House 
$7.5 billion proposal ah-eady out- 
weigh Reagan's $6.8 billion request. 

"This is not to say the administra- 
tion has any proposals to make 
changes beyond the 1985 budget," 
explains White. "We will hold the 
Pell grant at the '84 schedule, com- 
bine Work/Study with SEOG (Sup- 
plemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants) and make new NDSLs 
(National Direct Student Loans) 
only from repayment of old loans. 
No new money will he available for 
NDSL." 

Reagan's proposed budget would 



cut $330 million in student aid, or 
913,000 graduate and undergraduate 
awards. 

Congress consistantly has over- 
ridden the president's opposition to 
increased education spending, hold- 
ing the proposed cuts to a total loss 
of 20 percent of the 1980 college 
budget. 

"Fiscal '84 got some substantial 
increases," says Pat Smith of the 
American Council on Education 
(ACE). "We may get some 
increases again in '85. Reagan didn't 
ask for them, but we may get them 
anyway." 

"For that reason, I expect no more 
to be taken out," says Eton Gillespie, 
a spokesman for the College Board. 

But since the '82 cuts, the face of 
student financial aid has changed, 
he points out. Grant money has 
dropped from 80.3 percent of the 
total aid package to 48.2 percent. 
Loans have increased from 16.9 per- 
cent to 47.8 percent. 

If a second Reagan administration 
does manage to cut aid by 30 percent 
Gillespie fears some students would 
be priced out of the education 
market. 

"The big fear is that in the 
absence of student aid, lower- 
income students can't go to school," 
says the ACE's Smith. 

But the 0MB document is only a 
projection, not a prediction of the 
1985-89 budget. 

When asked about maintaining 
current higher education appropria- 
tion levels through 1989, and the 
projected 30 percent drop in "con- 
stant dollars", however, Debra Kal- 
celvik of the Congressional Budget 
Office only laughs. 

"There's probably a zero chance. 
Presidential budget requirements 
basically are ignored in Congress." 






Bloodmobile 
in Clarion 

On Tuesday, Oct. 2, the Clarion 
Oiapter of the American Red Cross 
will hold a bloodmobile in Tippin 
Gym from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. This 
could be a record year for donations 
if students, faculty and staff support 
the bloodmobile by donating. Mem- 
bers of University Women, Alpha 
Phi Omega and Alpha Sigma Tau 
will be there to assist donors. 

Donors must be between the ages 
of 17 and 66, weigh at least 110 
pounds and be in good health. Upon 
arrival at Tippin, please register. 
After registering a nurse will take a 
medical history, check pulse, blood 
pressure, temperature and hemoglo- 
bin. The process of donating blood 
takes only seven minutes! There is 
thai a 15-minute period for refresh- 
ments to help replace fluids. Be sure 
to eat breakfast or lunch before 
coming. Come early to avoid the 4-5 
p.m. rush! 

Less than a pint of blood is taken 
from the body's 10-12 pint supply. 
There is no after effect since the 
body replaces the liquid part of the 
blood within a few hours and cells 
within two weeks. A person may 
(tonate every eight weeks up to five 
times a year. Common medications 
such as aspirin, diet pills, birth 
control pills, antihistamines, etc., do 
not prevent a blood donation. Cer- 
tain others, however, such as anti- 
biotics will result in donor deferral. 

This bloodmobile is part of a re- 
gional system supplying blood from 
area donors to patients in hospitals 
at no charge. Donors may wish to 
have blood donations credited 
toward individuals by giving the pa- 
.^ent^ftaqieandadidres^. ,,. ,. 

Play to run 
Oct. 2-6 

Bob Ck>peland, chairman of the 
Speech Communication and Theatre 
Department at Clarion University, 
will be culminating his theatre ca- 
reer at Clarion as Big Daddy in 
Tennessee Williams' play. Cat on a 
Hot Tin Roof on Oct. 2-6. The play, 
which won both the Pulitzer Prize 
and Drama Critics Award, will be a 
part of the "Over 100" Theatre 
Celebration. "Over 100" means 
Copeland has directed 126 major 
productions during the past 25 years 
at Qarion University. 

Copeland's acting career consists 
of acting roles in various eastern 
and midwestem summer theatres, 
local conununity theatres, and uni- 
versity productions. Last year he 
appeared as the lead in a new 
romantic comedy, "Angels' Flight", 
which had a four week run at the 
Showroom Theatre in Hollywood, 
California, and played the role of a 
reporter in the soon-to-be-released 
film, Rickie I. 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof will feature 
students, faculty, alumni, and 
members of the community in major 
rol^. The play will be presented in 
the Marwick-Boyd Little Theatre at 
Qarion University and will be open 
to the public on Oct. 2-4. 

NEWS 

TIP? 
Call 2380 




CLARION'S CALL. Clarion, Pa. Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984-7 



Clarion blacked out 



Summor conatruction at B«ck«r continues Into th« school year. Worltors here 
work to rspalr th« brick work on th« buliding. Photo by Mike Downing 



A tractor trailer, which became 
entangled with sagging power lines 
near Owens-Illinois, caused the 
campus and community blackout 
Monday, Sept. 10. 

Jeffery D. Queer, of Shippenville, 
was in the process of turning a trac- 
tor trailer around in a parking lot on 
Grand Avenue when he accidently 
pulled down telephone and power 
lines causing the hour-long blackout 
throughout the northwestern sec- 
tions of Qarion, including the main 
campus of CUP. 

Borough Police say the power 



lines had been pulled down before 
and were hanging low. West Pern) 
was able to restore the power in 
Qarion within an hour. However, 
Qarion's electrician was able to 
generate power for the campus 
within 30 to 45 minutes. There were 
no injuries or damages reported. 

Public Safety would like to thank 
the students for their cooperation 
and patience during the blackout. 
They realize that it was an inconven- 
ience to everyone so your help was 
appreciated. 







Get down tD business faster. 

With the M-35. 



If there's one thing business 
students have always needed, 
this is it: an affordable, busi- 
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The Texas Instruments 
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Analyst. 

Its built-in business 
formulas let you perform 
complicated finance, 
accounting and statistical 
functions - the ones that 
usually require a lot of time 
and a stack of reference books, 
like present and future value 

© 1983 TcacaB Instniments 



calculations, amortizations 
and balloon payments. 

The BA-35 means you 
spend less time calculating, 
and more time learning. One 
keystroke takes the place 
of many. 

The calculator is just part 
of the package. You also get 
a book that follows most 
business courses: the Business 
Analyst Guidebook. Business 
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of calculator and classroom. 



A powerful combination 
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8— CLARION'S <$ALL, Clarion, Pa. Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984 




Joslyn visits Ivory Coast 



Ms. Joslyn from Clarion University Art department with souvenirs from the Ivory Coast. 



Photo by Mike Downing 



Five frosh win Hart Award 



Five incoming freshmen at 
Qarion University have been se- 
lected for the $1,200 Walter Hart 
Scholarships. 

Winners of the competitive schol- 
arships are: Traci Bednar of Natrona 
Heights, Amy B. Ebner of Frill's 
Comers, Donna L. Gesin of RD 1 Tio- 
nesta, Teryl Rodkey of Qearfield 
and Patricia A. Switzer of Rimers- 
burg. 

"Die scholarship, named after for- 
mer long-time admissions director 
Walter Hart, provides the students 
with $300 during each of their four 
years at Qarion University. 

Bednar, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Andrew F. Bednar of Natrona 
Heights, is a graduate of Highlands 
Senior High School and plans to 



major in computer science. Her ca- 
reer goal includes becoming a 
computer expert in scientific re- 
search. While in high school she was 
active in the following activities: 
Highlands Marching and Concert 
Band, National Honor Society, In- 
ternational Club, Varsity Club, 
manager of the Highlands girls var- 
sity tennis team, Alle-Kiski Honors 
Band ( 1983-84) , Mid-East Music Con- 
ference - 1984, National Merit Com- 
mended Student, Who's Who Among 
American High School Students, Al- 
legheny Valley Senior Women's Club 
Scholarship, PPG Community 
Scholarship finahst and Presidential 
Academic Fitness Award. 

Ebner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis R. Ebner of Frill's Corners, is 




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a graduate of North Clarion Junior- 
Senior High School. She plans to 
major in speech communication and 
theater and was active in high school 
as vice president of the Drama Qub, 
school musical, Junior Historians, 
National Honor Society and cheer- 
leading. 

Gesin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William Gesin of RD 1 Tionesta, is 
also a graduate of North Clarion 
Junior-Senior High School. She plans 
to major in either communication or 
speech pathology and audiology. She 
was active in track, cheerleading, 
National Honor Society, Junior His- 
torians, Chorus and Varsity Qub. 

Rodkey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John D. Rodkey of Clearfield, is a 
graduate of Gearfield Area High 
School. Planning for a major in ele- 
mentary education, she has career 
goals of becoming a teacher and a 
free-lance writer. She was active in 
the following activities during high 
school : editor of The Triangle school 
newspaper. National Honor Society, 
Spanish Club, Drama Club, two 
school plays and graduated third in 
her class. 

Switzer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Connell D. Switzer of Rimersburg, is 
a graduate of Union High School. 
She will be a pre-law major and 
plans to be a lawyer. 



Qarion University staff member 
Ms. Kathryn Joslyn visited the 
Ivory Coast of Africa over the sum- 
mer. 

The opportunity came from a pro- 
gram run by Parson's School of De- 
sign in New York City in conjunction 
with Cross Roads Africa, who has 
been sending students to Africa for 
25 years. Ms. Joslyn took advantage 
of the program in order to gain life 
experience for the class she teaches 
here at Clarion on African Art. 

Either undergraduate or graduate 
credit could be arranged through the 
program. The different areas of 
study were: weaving, ceramics, 
architecture, photography and art 
history. These areas of concentra- 
tion were taught by craftsmen and 
historians with the help of inter- 
preters. 

Ms. Joslyn and her group were 
given two orientations. The first was 
in New York. A speaker who was of 
particular interest to Ms. Joslyn was 
the head of the African Art section at 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
The second orientation was on the 
Ivory Coast, and it lasted four days. 
During this orientation the group 
was briefed on the dos and don'ts, 
they also went to bazaars and 
explored the city. 

After the orientation their "real" 
education began. Ms. Joslyn's area 
of study was Art History, as it per- 
tains to the class offered in Clarion's 
art department. 

The first trip to a village started 
out to be quite a disappointment as it 
was raining quite hard. Visions of 
muddy roads and a wasted day filled 
everyone's head as they made their 
way to the village. What they didn't 
know was that the village had been 
in the midst of a drau^t and in the 
villagers' minds the cluster of 
people, arriving by bus, had brought 
the rain. For this reason they were 
invited back, later that day, for a 



dance. The group also returned to 
the same village for an overnight 
stay. 

Ms. Joslyn commented favorably 
on the African people as a whole. 
This certain village had never been 
visited by American tourists before 
so the Americans were not greeted 
with any preconceived notions on the 
part of the villagers. 

Some of the cultural attitudes that 
Ms. Joslyn observed also merit men- 
tioning. Those members of the group 
studying weaving soon learned that 
in that part of the Ivory Coast, 
weaving is man's work, and that to 
allow the women in the group to 
learn this manly craft, the ancestors 
of the village had to be appeased. 
The appeasement came in the form 
of wine, which was poured into the 
ground. Ms. Joslyn's comment on 
this division of labor was two-fold, 
"You can look at it with the point of 
view that it's used to keep the 
women in their place - at the same 
time that place is very important - 
women are in charge of village life." 
The ability to bring things to hfe is 
viewed as the most important role of 
women in the village. 

The people of the village were ex- 
tremely considerate in showing the 
group the process of their work. Ms. 
Joslyn seemed most impressed by 
the chance element in tiie African 
Art. She said, "Within a system 
there is a chance randomness." 

October 21 is the opening day of an 
African Art exhibit in the Sandford 
Art Gallery. There will be pieces 
from the permanent collection as 
well as pieces Ms. Joslyn has 
brought back herself. 

Ms. Joslyn feels that her exper- 
ience in ttie Ivory Coast has given 
her a tremendous amount of 
practical life experience. Her 
African Art class, here at Qarion, 
will be enriched as she was by her 
travels. 



Classifieds 



Gay Information and Concerns 
Team meeting Thursday, Sept. 20. 
For information write Box 750, 
105 Reimer Center or contact an 
officer. All interested are welcome. 

Koinonia Christian Fellowship meets 

every Monday night at 8 in Reimer 

Coffeehouse. Koinonia is interde- 

nominational and all are welcome. 

House for Rent: N. 5th Ave., 4 bed- 
rooms, 2 full baths, washer and 
dryer. Good foi- 6-7 students. Call 
Ernie at 226-4653 or 275-4452. 

Students: House available for rent. 
Fall or Spring. Close to campus. 
Newly remodeled. Fully furnish- 
ed. Utilities included. Contact Ke- 
vin in the evenings at 226-8617. 

I am the way, the truth and the life; 
No one comes to the Father, but by 
Me. John 14:6. 

Is it true you can buy Jeeps for $44 




BOOT 



^^^SHOPS 



f^MILV FOOTWEAR 



MAIN STREET, CLARION 

Welcome Back 
Students 



through the U.S. (Jovernment? 
Get the facts today! Call (312) 
742-1142 Ext. 3701. 

Diamond: Marquise diamond en- 
gagement ring. Eight diamonds in 
matching lady's wedding band. 
Regular price $1200. September 
Diamond Special of the month, 
only $599. ^y at James Jewel- 
ers, Downtown, Qarion. 226-8711. 

For Sale: Panasonic AM/FM stereo 
cassette player. Dolby metal tape 
capabilities lightwei^t. 3 months 
old. Automatic turnover. Call 
Doug. 226-6864. 

Guitar Lessons for beginners of all 
ages by experienced acoustic gui- 
tarist, featuring: Folk and Coun- 
try, easy and fun. For more infor- 
mation, call 22fr-3388. 

Avon Representative needed on 
campus and in dormitories. New 
earnings program. Call 814-764- 
3446. 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,533/ 
year. Now hiring. For directory 
caU 1-805-687-6000. 

English Club Meets 

The English Club invites you to 
join them at the Qarion Clipper on 
Sept. 26, for an evening meal and a 
small introductory program. 

All interested studoits are invited. 
For more details see sign-up sheet 
on the English bulletin board. 




CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984—9 



Clarion Univoreity Protidontial Scholarship winners. Loft to Right: Willis Wil- 
liams, Scott Sciiui. IMargarst Msislsr, Prssldsnt Bond, Amy Qrisr and Eric Bay. 

High school grads 
win presidential awards 



Five outstanding high school grad- 
uates from schools throughout Penn- 
sylvania have been selected for the 
1984 $4,000 Clarion University Presi- 
dential Scholarships. 

Dr. Thomas A. Bond, president of 
Qarion University, has announced 
the following students as winners of 
the awards: Erik Bey of Pittsburgh, 
Amy Grier of Karthaus, Margaret 
Meister of Pittsburgh, Scott Schul of 
Kane and Willie B. Williams of Phil- 
adelphia. 

Bey, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Arnold 
Bey, is a 1984 graduate of Allderdice 
High School and is majoring in 
physics at Clarion. He was active in 
the National Honor Society and the 
track team while in highschooL . 

Grier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Grier Sr., is a 1984 graduate of 
Bald Eagle Area High School and is 
a National Merit Finalist. A music 
major at Qarion, she was active in 
the following activities during high 
school: National Honor Society, art 
editor of the high school newspaper, 
All-State Chorus, school play, Junior 
Miss Pageant, European Singing 
Tour, first runner-up Miss 
Christmas Seal and the leading role 
in "Bye-Bye Birdie." 

Meister, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
David Meister, is a 1984 graduate of 
North Allegheny High School and a 
National Merit Finalist. She will 



major in communication at Clarion. 
Meister was active in National 
Honor Society, "Who's Who Among 
American High School Students," 
concert choir, gifted student pro- 
gram and staff writer for "Varia- 
tions," a literary magazine. 

Schul, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary 
Schul, is a 1984 graduate of Kane 
High School and a National Merit 
Finalist. He wiU major in music 
marketing at Clarion. During his 
high school years, Schul was active 
in the following activities: National 
Honor Society, staff announcer and 
production specialist for WKZA 
radio in Kane, vice president of the 
Kane Marching Band, high school 
orchestra, high school student 
council, school newspaper and 
church pianist. 

Williams, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Squire Williams, is a 1984 graduate 
of William Penn High School and a 
communication major at Qarion. 
During high school, he was active in 
the following activities: National 
Honor Society, first place in the 
Martin Luther King Essay Contest, 
Philadelphia County winner of the 
Youth Debates on Energy, editor of 
the high school newspaper, student 
reporter for KYW radio in Phila- 
delphia, vice president of the debate 
team, high school track and 10th 
Memorial Baptist Church. 



What's your TV trivia LQ.? 



If you're the average adult viewer 
you spend 25 percent more time an- 
nually watching television than 
youngsters spend in school. Let's see 
how well this "studying" prepares 
you for the TV trivia questions in TV 
Guise's TV Game. 

Test yourself on this sampling of 
the questions — one from each of the 
seven TV programming categories. 
To determine TV Trivia Quotient: 6- 
7 correct — Amazing; 4-5, outstand- 
ing; 2-3 middling; 0-1 disappointing. 

Drama : When it went off the air in 
1975, this Western was the longest- 
running dramatic series in TV his- 
tory. 

Comedy: Who played Jeannie's 
"master" in I Dream of Jeannie 
(1965-70)? 

Honor 

Society 

reactivated 

Alpha Mu Gamma, the national 
honorary society, has once again be- 
come active on the Clarion Univer- 
sity campus after three years of 
inactivity. On May 1, 1984 the Clar- 
ion chapter, Delta Lambda, initiated 
13 new members at a banquet held at 
the Clarion Holiday Inn. The new 
member are: Eric Baird, Karen 
Beary, Elizabeth Conrad, Darryl 
Duerr, Susan Erb, John Grottenthal- 
er, Linda Lahnan, Michael Leon- 
heart, Karen Nurss, Geert Palle- 
mans, Diane Quinn, Barbara 
Smalley and Barbara Yutzler. 

The honorary society awards spe- 
cial achievement in foreign 
language studies (French, German, 
Russian and Spanish). Qualifica- 
tions for membership include at 
least 2 A's and 2 B's in language 
courses above the elementary level 
and an overall QPA of 2.75 or better. 
Foreign students are eligible for 
honorary membership. 

We hope to maintain our active 
status on the Qarion campus. All 
qualified students are invited to join. 
Application requests or questions 
should be directed to the chapter ad- 
visor. Dr. Erika Klusener, Room 8, 
Becht Hall. 



Commuter lounge on campus 



By: Shari McClory 



Plans for the first Commuter 
Lounge are underway this semester. 
After discussions last semester and 
Dr. Bond's approval, the basement 
of Harvey, below the Qarion Call's 
office, became the decided location 
for the lounge. The lounge will be 
open for student use Monday-Friday 
from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Hal Wassink, Ck>ordinator of Stu- 
dent Activities, has been assisting 
students in their plans for a com- 
muter lounge. He thinks that a cen- 
tral place for commuters to go to be 
advised and informed on issues 
concerning them is needed. 

Linda Twiest, who has been a 
commuter for three years, was one of 
the first students to initiate plans for 
the commuter lounge. She said, 
"Ttie lounge is needed to provide 
commuters with a home away from 
home to relax and study in between 
classes." 

At present, the lounge has tabl^ 
and chairs, a few old booths from its 



days as a faculty center, vending 
machines, restrooms and a bulletin 
board. A set of lockers were recently 
installed in the new lounge. Also, 
commuter lockers are located in the 
foyer of the Eagle's Den. 

Mrs. Twiest also admitted that 
commuters feel "out of it" at times. 
The bulletin board should serve as a 
means of communication between 
commuting students as well as with 
students involved in campus activi- 
ties and organizations. With the new 



lounge's presence, commuters 
should be able to be reached more 
easily on campus and hopefully will 
be more informed of campus events 
and news. 

With over 700 commuting students 
at Qarion, the commuter lounge can 
be a great addition to the university. 
Ck)mmuters interested in helping 
with the new lounge should check for 
notices of an upcoming meeting in 
Reimer Center and in the Daily 
Bulletin. 



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Movies: This unlikely song-and- 
dance man played Sky Masterson in 
the 1955 filming of "Guys and 
Dolls." 

News: What did Walter Cronkite 
tell his viewers when Apollo U's 
lunar module touched down on the 
surface of the moon? 

Sports: Larry Bird was Indiana 
State's star in the 1979 NCAA basket- 
ball championship game. Who filled 
that role for Michigan State? 

Kits: Pie throwing was a regular- 
feature on this comedian's 
numerous children's shows since 
1950s. 

Other TV: He made the Statue of 
Liberty "disappear" on his April 
1983 special. 

(ANSWERS: Drama, Gunsmoke; 
Comedy, Larry Hagman; Movies, 
Marlon Brando; News, That he had 
nothing to say; Sports, Earvin 
"Magic" Johnson; Kids, Soupy 
Sales; Other TV, David Copperfield) 

MORE TRIVIA 

L "Is it bigger than a breadbox?" 

was a classic question on this 

show. 
2. He followed Ronald Reagan as 



host of Death Walley Days. 

3. He was the first to bring to life the 
character of Hawkeye in the 1970 
movie MM •S'H." 

4. Who was the only other person 
who knew the real identity of 
Batman and Robin? 

5. What "diplomat" brought Mena- 
hem Begin and Anwar Sadat to- 
gether for the first time in 1977? 

6. Howdy Doody had a twin brother. 
What was his name? 

7. What country did the U.S. defeat 
to win the ice hockey gold medal 
in the 1980 winter Olympics? 
(ANSWERS: 1. What's My Line. 2 

Robert Taylor; 3. Donald Sutherland. 
4. Alfred, the butler. 5. Walter Cron- 
kite; 6. Double Doody; 7. Finland) 

All questions were prepared and 
authenticated by editors of TV 
Guide. Since its inception in April, 
1953, TV Guide has sold more than 20 
billion copies. With over 100 editions 
published throughout the U.S., TV 
guide uses 4,000 tons of paper per 
week. The annual use of 208,000 tons 
outweight two nuclear aircraft car- 
riers or five Missouri-Class battle- 
ships. Look for next trivia test in the 
next issue. 






77 ' '^/> 

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Mon. thru Fri. 



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Fox's Pizza Den 

40 South Sixth Ave.. Clarion 

226-7970 



10~CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa. Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984 




Alpha Sigma Alpha 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha 
would like to welcome everyone 
back to Qarion. Let's make it a good 
one. 

Many exciting things have taken 
place since last semester. Our con- 
gratulations go out to the following 
sisters: Katie Palmer on her laval- 
iering to Dan Buckley of Tau Kappa 
Epsilon and Michele Rudock on her 
lavaliering to Ken Lenig of Alpha 
Chi Rho at Edinboro. Best wishes 
from us all! 

We would also like to congratulate 
our Alunmi Chris Kutskel Hearst on 
being named co-Panhel advisor. 
Good luck on your new endeavor. 

The Alpha Sigs are planning for a 
great semester. We have just moved 
our suite off campus to a house on 



REEK 

Wood Street. We would like to extend 
our thanks to all the people who gave 
their support to make this move 
possible. We invite all students to 
stop by and visit. 

We wish all Greeks the best of luck 
with Rush. 

Phi Sigma Kappa 
Now that the semester is in full 
swing, the brothers of Phi Sigma 
Kappa would like to thank all who 
participated in our volleyball tour- 
nament. The evening was a real suc- 
cess and we hope to 60 it again. 

The brothers and little sisters 
invite any interested person to our 
upcoming rush parties. All dates and 
places will be announced. If you 
have any questions feel free to ask 
one of the brothers anytime. 



Composers can win $15,000 




Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, SEPT. 20 ,„ ^ „. , 

BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, English Muffin, Fried Potatoes, Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, Pineapple 

LUNCH : Split Pea Soup, Corn Chowder, Barbecue Rib Sandwich, Chicken Pot Pie w/Biscuit, Corn 

DINNER : Split Pea Soup, Com Chowder, Roast Pork w/Gravy, Roast Beef, Com, Potatoes, Beets. 

li'mHAV SK'PT '*1 ■ 

BREAKFAST: Hard Boiled Eggs, Bacon, Fried Potatoes, Scrambled Eggs, Coffee Cake, Apple 
Fritters w/Hot Syrup, Caramel Rolls. , , u n n .u 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Rice Soup, Boston Fish Chowder, Grilled Hamburger on Roll with 
Sliced Tomatoes, Onions & Lettuce, Baked Macaroni* Cheddar Cheese, Corn Chips. 
DINNER : Homemade Chicken Rice Soup. Boston Fish Chowder, Fried Perch Fillet, Baked Mam- 
cotti. Corn, Potatoes, Greens 

BREAKFAST: FriedEggs, Blueberry Muffin, Grilled Spam, Fried Potatoes, Streusel Coffee 
Cake, French Toast w/Hot Syrup. „ ^ ., ^ i- /. r^ d lo. 

LUNCH: Cream of Mushroom Soup, Beef Broth, Submarine Sandwich, Chih Con Came, PoUto 

D1I>KeR : Cream of Mushroom Soup, Beef Broth, Roast Top Round of Beef, Breaded Chicken Cut- 
let, Beans, Baked Potato, Vegetables 
SUNDW SEPT 23 

BRUNCH: Grapefruit Half, Chilled Pineapple Slices, Open Face Reuben Sandwich w/Dill Pickle, 
Thick Sliced Bacon, Scrambled Eggs, Sausage Links, Tater Gems, Cinnamon Rolls, English Muf- 

DINNER: Tomato Soup, Beef Broth, Baked Barbeque Chicken Eighths, Swedish Meat Balls, 

Glazed Apples, Carrots 

MONDAY SEPT 24' 

BREAKF.VST: Chi'iled Grapefruit Half, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Fried Potatoes, Stewed 

Prunes, Blueberry Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, English Muffins, Apple Coffee Cake. 

LUNCH : Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup, Cream of Carrot Soup, Texas Tommie on Roll, Cream 

Chipped Beefon Toast, French Fries, Com. . ,. „ . ^^ av u 

DINNER : Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup, Cream of Carrot, Beef Ravioli, Battered Fried h ish, 

Peas, Parslied Noodles, Creamed Onions. 

Tl 'K'SH W SKPT 2t* 

BHEAKF.^ST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Wheat, Cora Muffin, Potatoes, French Toast 
w/Hol Syrup, Sausage Patty, French Crumb Cake. ^ . ^ ,^ n a 

LUNCH : Cream of Potato Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Hot Breast of Turkey Sandwich w/Gravy, Corned 
Beet Hash, Hash Brown Potatoes, Wax Beans. „ ., „ ^ „ , „ „ d .. a 

DINNER: Cream of Potato Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Beef Straganoff, Stuffed Veal Roll, Buttered 
Noodles, Mixed Vegetables, Corn. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 26: ^^„ . ,., „, 

BREAKFAST: Cantaloupe Wedge, Sliced Peaches, Cheese Omelette, Fried Potatoes, Waffles 
w/HotSyrup, Cream of Rice, Caramel Buns, Coffee Cake. 

LUNCH ■ Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Cheeseburger on Roll ( Sliced Cheese 
w/sliced Tomatoes. Onions and Lettuce), Kolbassi Cooked in Sauerkraut, Corn Curls, Sauerkraut. 
DINNER: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Lasagna, Corned Beef Brisket, 
Vegetables. Potatoes, Lima Beans. 



JOB HUNTING? 

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will help. 

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Price List. 

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Hummelstown, PA 17036 



Don't Forget 
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Town & Country Cleaners 



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.Tuxedo Sales and Rental 
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.Professional Dry Cleaning 
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Delta Zeta 

The sisters of Delta Zeta had our 
"Welcome Back" cookout for all 
sisters on Saturday, Sept. 8. 

We would like to wish the best of 
luck to our Homecoming 
candidates: Aileen Davoren, senior; 
Chris DiFucci, junior; Kim Callahan, 
sophomore, and Sue Burick, fresh- 
man. We're behind you 100 percent. 

The Sigma Chi brothers are our 
partners in building a Homecom- 
ing float. We plan on having the win- 
ning float this year - right, guys? 

Also, we wish everyone the best of 
luck for a successful semester. And 
we hope everyone who is participat- 
ing in Rush is having fun. 
Sigma Sigma Sigma 

The sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma 
would like to welcome everyone 
back to CUP. We wish the best of 
luck to all the newcomers. The Tri 
Sigs have been busily preparing for 
Fall Rush. We hope that all who 
attend C.U.P's Rush parties enjoy 
experiencing the Greek life and con- 
sider being a part of it. Our sorority 
is led by our executive board - 
Jeanne Ivel, Pres.; Lu Lu Walker, 
Vice Pres.; Linda Howard, Treas- 
urer; Sue McCanna, Scretary; Les- 
lie Krache, Education; Michele 
LaTour, Rush. We have an exciting 
itinerary planned for the fall semes- 
ter. A few activities include our an- 
nual parents dinner. Homecoming 
float building with the Theta Chis 
and mixers. Girls being honored this 
week are open bids: Lanea Baker, 
Karla Bembeneck, Dee Freedman, 
Jody Sacriponte, Gloria Smith. Our 
birthday girls are: Linda Howard, 
Sue McCanna, and Megan Manning. 
We are proud to have our sister Miss 
C.U.P., Missy Rilling in the Home- 
coming parade. 

Gala Held 

The fourth annual Gala Concert 
featuring pieces ranging from 
Chopin to Gershwin, from Jazz to 
Spanish dances, with a few stops in 
between was seen Saturday, Sept. 
15. 

A variety of performers were 
featured. Faculty members Paula 
Amrod, Grace Urrico, Donald 
Black, John McLean, Christian Boh- 
len. Dean Famham, Jaropolk Las- 
sowsky, and Vahe Berberian dem- 
onstrated their talents at the con- 
cert. The event also included guest 
artists Janet Berberian, Margaret 
Wells, Hendrika Bohlen, Betty Lou 
Famham, and CUP students 
Pavana Baird, Jill Kahn and John 
Norman. Guest student Oksana Las- 
sowsky also performed. 

The concert was held at 8:15 
p.m. in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium, 
and was dedicated to President and 
Mrs. Thomas Bond. The entire effort 
was founded and coordinated by 
Professor Vahe Berberian. 



The 33rd annual BMI Award to 
Student Composers competition will 
award $15,000 to young composers, 
James G. Roy Jr., BMI vice pres- 
ident, Concert Music Administra- 
tion announced recently. He added 
that the deadline for entering the 
1984-85 competition is February 15, 
1985. 

BMI established the awards pro- 
gram in 1951 in cooperation with 
music educators and composers. 
TTie contest is designed to encourage 
young composers in the creation of 
concert music and, through cash 
prizes, to aid in continuing their 
musical education. The prizes, 
which vary from $500 to $2,500, are 
awarded at the discretion of the final 
judging panel. To date, 297 students, 
ranging in age from 8 to 25 have 
received BMI Awards. 

The 1984-85 competition is open to 
students who are citizens or perman- 
ent residents of the Western Hemi- 
sphere (including North, Central 
and South America and the Carib- 
bean Island nations) and who are 
enrolled in accredited secondary 
schools, colleges or conservatories 
or are engaged in private study with 
recognized and established teachers 
anywhere in the world. Contestants 
must be under 26 years of age on 
Dec. 31, 1984. There are no limita- 
tions as to instrumentation, stylistic 
consideration or length of work sub- 
mitted. Students may enter only one 
composition, which need not have 
been composed during the year of 
entry. Compositions, which are 
entered under pseudonyms, are 
considered by a preliminary panel of 
judges before going to a final panel. 
Last year's preliminary judges were 



Gheorghe Costinescu, Gerald War- 
field and Frank Wigglesworth, with 
Ulysses Kay serving as consultant. 
The final judges were T. J. Ander- 
son, George Crumb, Paul Dunkl, 
Max Lifchitz, Richard Moryl, Kirby 
Pines, Robert Pollock, Christopher 
Rouse, William Sisson, Pril Smiley, 
Bruce J. Taub and Noel B. Zahler, 
with Ulysses Kay as presiding 
judge. William Schuman is perman- 
ent chairman of the judging panel. 
In the 1983-84 competition, 22 win- 
ners ranging in age from 9 to 25 were 
presented awards at a reception at 
the St. Regis-Sheraton Hotel in New 
York City on May 19, 1984. 

Five previous winners of BMI 
Awards to Student Composers have 
gone on to win the coveted Pulitzer 
Prize in Music. They are George 
Crumb, Mario Davidovsky, Donald 
Martino, Joseph Schwantner and 
Charles Wuorinen. 

BMI is the largest music licensing 
organization in the world, represent- 
ing over 72,000 writers and publish- 
ers. More than 50 percent of the 
music played on American radio sta- 
tions in the past year is licensed by 
BMI. It also has reciprocal agree- 
ments with 37 foreign performing 
rights licensing organizations 
around the world, making its music 
available there and representing 
foreign music in this country. Each 
year BMI sponsors a variety of 
workshops and seminars designed to 
encourage participation in all areas 
of music. 

Official rules and entry blanks for 
the 1984-85 competition are available 
from James G. Roy Jr., Director, 
BMI Awards to Student Composers, 
320 West 57th St., New York, NY 
10019. -: low iimJatiDyft i>i imi tn Ihoi 



Hinga joins writing staff 



The Counseling and Career Plan- 
ning Center is proud to introduce our 
newest staff member, Ms. Judy 
Hinga. Ms. Hinga comes to us from 
Kalamazoo, Michigan where she is a 
doctoral candidate in Counseling 
Psychology at Western Michigan 
University. Ms. Hinga recently com- 
pleted a one year International As- 
sociation of Counseling Services ap- 
proved internship at James Madison 
University in Virginia. 

Ms. Hinga will provide individual, 
personal and career counseling to 
students and staff. In addition to 
these services, Ms. Hinga will be de- 
veloping a variety of outreach pro- 
grams to residence halls and student 
organizations on campus. The pro- 
gram topics will be selected by as- 
sessing the student body's needs and 
interest areas. Some examples of 
the outreach program requests are: 
time management, relationship and 
communication skills and coping 
with depression. 

Ms. Hinga will also serve as the 
Center's liaison person for the 
various academic departments 



OFFICE: (B14) 226-8742 HOME: (814> 226-7316 

MEN'S AND WOMEN'S WEIGHT TRAINING 






803 Vi LIBERTY STREET, CLARION. PA 16214 
(SECOND FLOOR V.F.W. BUILOINQ) 
OWNER: ANDREW A. MONTANA, JR. 

* Featuring Tanning Bed 



which have been involved with the 
Center's growing collection of audio- 
tapes which describe how that 
particular major fits into the world 
of work. 

Persons interested in knowing 
more about these services may 
contact Ms. Hinga at 148 Egbert 
Hall, ext. 2255. 

Fish lovers unite 

The 38th Annual Tropical Fish 
Show returns to Buhl Science Center 
Sept. 23-Oct. 7 with an assortment of 
rare and beautiful fishes. 

Dozens of professionally decorat- 
ed aquariums feature such finny de- 
nizens of the deep as glippering gold- 
fish, dainty angels, flashy neon tet- 
ras, kissing fish and the dreaded 
piranha. 

A 'pet' project of the Greater 
Pittsburgh Aquarium Society, the 
show is also an important competi- 
tive event. 

Fishkeeping is one of the nation's 
most popiUar hobbies. In past years, 
sales to aquarists had exceeded $600. 
Membership in SPASI provides local 
enthusiasts with the opportunity to 
exchange educational information 
and personal tips with other fish 
lovers. GPASI members compete 
and cooperate with regional clubs 
throughout the tri-state area. 

llie show is open to the public 
Tuesday-Friday and Sunday, 1-5 
p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Vis- 
itors may also see the current sky 
show, "A Dozen Universes," an 
intriquing look at a dozen different 
views of oiff universe. 

For more information, call BiM's 
Activities Hotline, 321-4300. 



I 



Foreign students 
tally up 

By: Darren B. Fouse 

Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania has 150 foreign enrollments 
this Fall semester, representing 40 
different territories throughout the 
world. This enrollment jumped from 
50 students. 

Foreign Student Advisor Dr. John 
McLain explained how foreign stu- 
dents learn of Clarion, "Our best 
recruiters are ex-students. They 
enjoy Clarion and recommend it to 
friends and relatives from their 
home land. Clarion is safer than the 
big cities." 

Programs that are run also make 
the foreign students feel more com- 
fortable here at Clarion. 

One of his programs is the Clarion 
International Association, which 
meets twice a month and is open to 
the entire student body. The pro- 
gram engages students activities 
that allow them to share their own 
cultures and backgrounds.* Each 
month they honor a different region 
of the world. 

October is African month. There 
will be an African Art exhibit at the 
Marwick-Boyd and other displays at 
the Wood Street entrance of Carlson. 
On Friday, Oct. 12 at 7 p.m., in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium, an 
African night will be held. The eve- 
ning will be filled with African song 
and dance and refreshments. This is 
open to anyone interested. 

Poetry contest 
accepting works 

By: Kelly Zimmerman 

The National College Poetry Con- 
test of 1984 is accepting works from 
now until Oct. 31 from collegiate 
poets to be judged for printing into 
the American Collegiates Poets 
Anthology. A total of $200 in cash and 
book prizes along with free printing 
of accei^ed poems into the ACP 
Anthology are being offered. 

All students are eligible to submit 
up to 10 of his or her origmal and un- 
published verse. All entries must be 
typed, doublespaced and on one side 
of the page. E^ach entry is to be on a 
separate sheet of paper and have the 
ratrant's name, address and college 
appearing in the upper left hand cor- 
ner. There are no restrictions on 
form or theme and poems may be up 
to 14 lines in length. Tliey must all be 
titled and foreign language poems 
are welcomed. There is an initial $1 
registration fee for the first submis- 
sion and all additional entries will be 
charged 50 cents each. 

Any student desiring to enter their 
poems should have them post- 
marked no later than Ov . 31. They 
can be sent, along with required 
fees, to: International Publications, 

P.O.Box44044-L 

Los Angeles, CA. 90044 

All prize winners will be notified 
immediately after the Oct. 31 dead- 
line. 

ANSWERS 



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©Edward Julius Collegiate CW79-29 

ACROSS 43 Popular soft drink 13 French explorer 
44 Sailing vessels 15 Bloke 
1 Scatter 45 Record 17 Those who are not 
6 Play parts 46 Printer's measures cool 
12 Kind of music 47 "Remember the "20 Picnic drinks 

14 Hidden 48 Dungeons 23 College girls 

15 Valuable violin 49 East Indian cedars 24 Bog bird 

16 Sea west of India 51 Arachnids 26 Fussy fellows 

18 Musical instruments 53 Well-known song of 27 Hits hard 

19 Pitcher's statistic 1917 29 Rajah's wife 

21 Religious notable 54 New Orleans school 30 Oriental sounders 
(abbr.) 55 Guard 32 Overcrowd 

22 Barbary 56 Played around with 33 Confronted 

23 Potential officer 34 Jungle beast 

24 Sheet music symbol DOWN 35 Annoying 

25 Favorite 36 Form of "lie" 

26 People of Posen 1 Fights 37 Type of triangle 

27 Mortimer 2 Regarding that 38 Like some shirts 

28 Reddish-brown matter 40 "Gone With the Wind" 
horses 3 Frolics character 

30 Sashays 4 Greek god of love 42 Military meal 

31 de-camp 5 Pallid 44 Less covered up 

32 de grace 6 Works hard 45 Catcher in Abbott 

33 Tosses 7 Proofreading mark and Costello routine 
36 John Wayne film, 8 Letters in Athens 47 shop 

"The Day" 9 Neighbor of 48 Hawaiian port 

39 Buenos Wyoming (abbr.) 50 Noise 

40 Longings 10 Isolated 52 Opposite of call , 

41 Machine part 11 Size in finance 





CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa. Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984- 11 




The word lace comes from the Latin word laqueus, which 
means noose or snare. 



COLLEGIO'S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

518 MAIN ST., CLARION 

EVERY TUESDAY: 5 P.M.CLOSE 
16" PIZZA $2.99 

(No Delivery on Special) 




EVERY FRIDAY: 

LASAGNA $2.99 

SPINACH CALZONE. . $1.75 

THIS SATURDAY, SEPT. 22 

BUY ONE 16" PIZZA, 

GET ONE FREE TOPPING 

FREE DELIVERY 226-5421 




Dr. Sharaw, Editor of Studies in Contemporary Satire Photo by flenee Rosensteel 

Sheraw edits satire 



By: Susan Boll 



By day. Barrel Sheraw is a pro- 
fessor of English; by night, he is the 
editor of a publication known as 
Studies in Contemporary Satire. 
Most people confuse satire with 
comedy. According to Sheraw, 
"Satire leaves the reader frustrated 
with the world and what is happen- 
ing to society. It makes them want to 
do something about the situation. 
Generally, satire is intolerant of 
weaknesses." 

Dr. Sheraw is a graduate of Qar- 
ion University. He received his doc- 
toral degree at Ohio University 
where he was later employed as a 
professor for seven years. In 1978, he 
returned to teach at Clarion. 

Studies in Contemporary Satire 
was first published in 1973. It has 
outlasted many other original satire 



magazines. Studies boasts an 
impressive advisory board 
consisting of: novelist, Joseph 
Heller (Catch 22), poet, Diane Wako- 
ski. New York Times Book Review 
critic, Wilfrid Sheed and Heinrich 
Boll who is a German winner of the 
Nobel Prize for literature. 

Most of the material presented in 
the publication deals with art, poet- 
ry, fiction and non-fiction. The main 
contributors to Studies are profes- 
sors, free-lance artists and writers 
in the United States and several 
foreign countries. This particular 
publication can be found in univer- 
sity libraries in the United States, 
Germany, France, and Canada. 

Satire can be traced back to Greek 
and Roman societies. It will continue 
to be a vital literary art form as long 
as there are institutions and power- 
ful personalities to ridicule. 



tSUBlll^'if 



18 Varieties: Subs & Salads 

We bake our own rolls - White and Honey Wheat 
(no preservatives) 

Free Delivery 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

($3.00 minimum) 

HOURS: 10 a.m. till 2 a.m. Sun. thru Thurs. 
and 10 a.m. til 3 a.m. Fri. and Sat. 

226-7131 




12^CLARI0N'S CALL. Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984 



Study states freshmen will gain nine pounds 



If you're a college freshman, arm 
yourself for a four-year battle of the 
bulge. 

A just-released study of Penn 
State students by nutritionist Jean 
Harvey and two other researchers 
reveals men gain an average of 9.1 
pounds during their first year of col- 
lege. Women average a nine-pound 
gain. 

And the extra pounds sneak up 
each year. Sophomores gain 7.3 
pounds while juniors put on 7.8 



pounds and seniors 6.5 pounds, the 
study found. 

Many students blame fattening 
dorm food, but Harvey says the 
study exonerates it. 

"Residence (on or off campus) 
wasn't a factor in weight change," 
she states. "So students' claim that 
dorm cafeteria food caused the 
gains aren't accurate." 

The questionnaire, sent to 2400 
Penn State undergraduates, drew 
about 1000 responses to 36 questions 



about weight, eating and exercise. 
Results show 67 percent of the men 
questioned and 62 percent of the 
women admitted gaining weight. 

Only senior respondents lost 
weight, apparently thanks to exer- 
cise, Harvey says. 

Emotional and psychological fac- 
tors, such as living away from home, 
weren't surveyed, but Harvey has 
"a feeling people at Penn State are 
planning a study to determine the in- 
fluence of these factors on student 



weight gain." 

No one knows if all students put on 
pounds at the same clip Penn State 
students do. 

TTie American College Health As- 
sociation shows no record of any na- 
tional surveys similary to the Penn 
State study, though a 1978 federal 
study determined college students 
were an average of six pounds heav- 
ier than the students of 1968. 

Yet overweight students and 
health and nutritional concerns have 




Come to McDonald's, " buy a Big 
Mac" sandwich and any size 
order of fries, and you'll get 
a Bi^Mav' pen FREE! 

Bi^Mac IS a 6gc 
value, yours FREE just 
for enjoying the taste 
of a delicious Big Mac. 

Get yourself a 
Bi^Ma^ in a different 
color each week. 
Then you decide 
which color is best 
for highlighting 
important things 
like your roommate's 
portion of the 
phone bill! 

Welcome back to 
campus, and to 
McDonald's! 

Offer good through September 30, 1984 or while supplies last, 
only at this McDonald's Restaurant: 707 Main St., Clarion. 



Not valid in conjunction 

with any other offer 

One mt^ IMa% per Big Mac 



c 1983 McDonald s Corporation 



prompted many colleges to imple- 
ment diet and exercise programs. 

Wayne State University in Detroit 
bases weight control on behavioral 
methods to improve eating habits. 

Many student health clinics 
publish diet tips in campus news- 
papers, especially during the spring 
"get in shape" rush. 

In 1982, Stanford developed a 
dorm nutrition program, posting 
nutritional information for cafeteria 
food. It listed the calorie, fat and 
cholesterol contents of each item it 
sold. 

But the program has done little so 
far to change students' eating 
habits, Nikirk admits, although a 
survey shows 80 percent of the stu- 
dents are aware of it. 

"There's only so much you can do 
in the dining halls," she says. 
"Maybe next year we'll take a dif- 
ferent approach." 

Tutors available 

For the past 10 years Student De- 
velopment Services has been provid- 
ing tutorial services to the students 
of Clarion University. During the 
past academic year over 1300 stu- 
dents took advantage of the content 
tutoring, Reading/Study Skill tutor- 
ing, and workshops on study tech- 
niques. 

Student Development Services is 
continually instituting new ap- 
proaches in order to improve 
services and to make them more 
available to students. For example, 
last Spring a walk-in service was 
made available for students in the 
introductory accounting courses. 
This service will be available again 
this Fall. Also, this past summer a 
videotape series entitled, "Sharpen- 
ing Your Study Skills" was develop- 
ed. It is intended that these two new 
approaches will assist Student De- 
velopment Services in better serving 
the needs of students. 

Also in the planning are Study 
Skill workshops to be run again this 
Fall. These workshops are a joint 
effort with the Act 101/Educational 
Opportunities Program and Special 
Services Program. 

How can a student get a tutor? 
Just go to 114 Egbert Hall and 
complete a Tutor Request Form. 
Services are free, and available in 
most lower division courses. If a 
tutor is not available other arrange- 
ments can be made. 

Only at Clarion 

-can two girls "moon" a car full of 
tovraies at Cook Forest to find they 
are in fact students — in the next 
dorm! (Let's party sometime 
dudes!!) 

-do people go "on the wagon" to 
destroy their alcohol tolerance in or- 
der to get drunk faster. 

-can a girl find 10 new scopes this 
semester. 

-can a person be too far gone to 
realize the deck was fixed in Up and 
Down the River. 

-is Swimming I a prerequisite for 
entrance into Ralston's first floor 
r:estroom. 

-did three girls find the secret for 
making Chandler food 

edible. . .Happy Hour. 

-can someone get more out of 
reading Shakespeare trashed than if 
the person was sober. 




CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984-13 



Tennis open slated 
as ALF ann ual event 

BvBfthMikus opportunity for everyone who h 



By: BethMikua 

A new dimension has been added 
to the 1984 Autumn Leaf Festival. 
The Clarion University women's 
team along with the Clarion Cham- 
ber of Commerce have combined 
forces in presenting a new addition 
to the Clarion Autumn Leaf Festival. 
This year's new addition to the 
schedule is an open tennis tourna- 
ment on Oct. 12, 13 and 14. 

There will be five events in which 
participants may compete in: men's 
and women's singles, men's and wo- 
men's doubles, and mixed doubles. 
There will be a $5 registration fee for 
singles and a $10 total fee for doubles 
and mixed doubles. 

Forms for registering may be 
picked up in room 113 in Tippin 
Gynmasium. They should be return- 
ed along with a check made payable 
to the CLARION CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE to 113 Tippin or to the 
Chamber of Commerce, Clarion, PA 
16214. The last day for entries is 
Wednesday, Oct. 10 at 6 p,m. 

The matches will take place at the 
Nair Hall and Campbell Hall courts. 
On Friday, Oct. 12 and Saturday, 
Oct. 13 matches will be played from 
5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and on Sunday from 
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or until the con- 
clusion of the tournament. 

Tennis balls will be provided for 
all participants. Best two sets out of 
three wins with a 12-point tie break- 
er to determine winners. 

Trophies will be awarded for first 
and second place in each category. 
Absentees forfeit their match. Late 
comers have a 15-minute grace per- 
iod before defaulting. 

Clarion University tennis coach, 
Norbert A. B^chnagel will serve as 
cliairman for the tournament. He is 
very enthusiastic about it. Coach 
Baschnagel feels this is an excellent 



opportunity for everyone who has 
any interest in tennis to get out and 
show their skills. 

Scheduling for players will be 
posted outside of room 113 Tippin 
Gymnasium or players may call the 
tennis office at 226-2248 or the Clar- 
ion Chamber of Commerce at 226- 
9161 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wed- 
nesday, Oct. 10 and TTiursday, Oct. 
11. If you are unable to reach anyone 
at these numbers call Coach Basch- 
nagel at his home at 226-5098. 

One does not need to be a John 
McEnroe or a Chris Evert Lloyd to 
participate. This tournament is open 
to anyone and everyone barring 
none. See you on the courts ! 



Lady netters serve up St. Vincents 



By: Elaine Beach 



"We have a very young team, with 
talent and depth," says Clarion Uni- 
versity's women's head tennis coach, 
Norbert Baschnagel. "We're looking 
for a winning season and to place 
higher in the Pennsylvania State 
Tournament than last year. The 
girls' team placed Uth out of 14th in 
the 1983-84 playoffs. 

The two co-captains for the 1984-85 
season are juniors Kim Demaio and 
Lynn Fye who will be leading their 
team onto victory. The six varsity 
players include freshmen Suzi Fritz, 
Kim Demaio, Lynn Fye, Lisa 
Thompson and Vicki Verni, and 
sophomore Susan Reeder. 

One of Clarion's assets is that the 
competition is tough and establish- 
ing its doubles teams. The only 
weakness the Golden Eagles may 
have is "inexperience to college 
tennis." Coach Baschnagel states 
that if the girls' team uses what he 



calls the "4 c's of tennis: control, 
concentration, consistency, and 
Clarion (spirit) ," they will be sure to 
have a successful season! 

So far, the girls have been suc- 
cessful if their first match against 
St. Vincent is any indication. "It is a 
good way to open the season," says 
Coach Baschnagel about the team's 
9-0 victory. Singles player Kim De- 
maio played a steady game defeat- 
ing Beth Hoffman 6-0, 6-0. Kim was 
voted Golden Eaglette for the week. 

The home match against St. Fran- 
cis on Sept. 11 was cancelled due to 
rain. The Golden Eagles' next home 
match is the Tri-Match against Gan- 
non and California on Sept. 22. Good 
luck girls! 

Results from St. Vincent's Match : 
Suzi Fritz defeated Maria Bolkovac 
6-4, 6-4. 

Kim Demaio defeated Beth Hoff- 
man 6-0, 6-0. 

Lynn Fye defeated Jolene Mercer 
6-1,6-1. 

Lisa Thompson defeated Nancy 
Burkhardt6-0,6-0. 



Vicki Verni defeated Margaret Su- 
jansky 6-0, 6-0. 

Susan Reeder defeated Janene 
Coleman 6-1, 6-0. 
1st Doubles Team 

Dawn Funya and Darla Kneebone 
defeated Maria Bolkovac and Beth 
Hoffman 2-6, 6-1, 6-2. 
2nd Doubles Team 

Amy Brenner and Benet Hefflin 
defeated Jolene Mercer and Nancy 
Burkhardt6-l,6-3. 
3rd Doubles Team 

Elaine Leff and Cathy Milliken de- 
feated Margaret Sujansky and Mary 
Allison 6-1, 6-0. 

Sports 
Tip? 
2380 





Clarion clashes with a tough team. Catch all the football action on Page 16. 



Clarion administrators tal<e tourney 



Rick Carter 
score of 68 to 
vision of the 
University 
Tournament 
Mayfield Golf 
fired a 72 to 
vision. 



of Franklin shot a net 
win the handicap di- 
third annual Qarion 
Foundation Golf 
held Sunday at the 
Club, while Lee Krull 
win the callaway di- 



City, Bob Cogley of Clarion, Bob Clarion, Joe Grunenwald of Knox, 

Leonard of RD 2 Shippenville, Don Ed Say of Clarion and Al Exton of 

Stroup of Qarion and Dick Kooman RD 2 Shippenville. 
of Clarion. 

Other winners in the callaway di- ^ j^ ■ 

vision were Andy Palaggo of New \jO 1 90 1 OS 

Bethlehem, Rev. John Kuzilla of 



Jack Blaine, vice president for de- 
velopment at Clarion University re- 
ported 72 golfers participated in the 
tournament which raised approxi- 
mately $3,000 for academic schol- 
arships. 

In the closest to the pin compe- 
tition, Melvin Mitchell of Brookville 
won on hole number eight, Jim 
Flinchbaugh of Oil City on hole num- 
ber 14, and Mark Riesmeyer of 
Qarion on hole number 17. 

Following Carter in the handicap 
division were Tom Holquist of Oil 



t^^ELCOTlE^A^ 



^ZrTT//7/r>^^^^\ 



^ie ;4eaciHtK .deal 

226-^370 



eo'kPO'H 



LNlYlEIPSITy 



INh^ 



MAIN STREET & 4th AVE. 



THURSDAY, SEPT. 20 
ALL NIGHT 

MUG AND FIRST BEER ONLY $1 

Refills only 20' 




"You Keep The Mug!" 





14-CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984 



Lady spikers aware of team concept 



By: Tiki Kahle 



The 1984 Clarion women's volley- 
ball team led by head coach Sharon 
Daniels-Oleksak is ready for an 
exciting season of play. The Lady 
Eagles ended the 1983 season with a 
record of 23-19 and were ranked fifth 
in the NCAA's Division II East 
Region. 

Entering her fourth season as 
coach of the Lady Eagles Daniels- 
Oleksak, who has improved 
Clarion's record each of the last 
three seasons, feels 1984 should be no 
exception. "We finally have an* 
experienced team (two seniors, two 
juniors, four sophomores) return- 
ing, one that should make less errors 
which should result in winning more 
games," the Clarion coach said of 
this year's squad. "Fans can expect 
an aggressive, exciting team in 1984 
that has the ability to mount a ser- 
ious challenge for the (PSAC) West- 
em Division title and become a state 
contender providing we stay healthy. 
ITiis is a team with a high level of 
skill, but even more important than 
that, they have already displayed a 
dedication to the sport and an aware- 
ness of the "team concept" that oth- 
er Qarion teams did not have," as- 
sessed Daniels-Oleksak. 

Returning with the most exper- 
ience are seniors Janet Sobeck (N. 
Huntingdon, Pa.) and Ellen Borowy 



(Elyria, Oh. ) . Sobeck, a setter, earn- 
ed honorable mention all-conference 
honors last year with 1,327 "sets". 
Borowy, an outside hitter, had 231 
"spike kills" on her way to being 
named by CoSida (College Sports In- 
formation Directors of America) 
as a third team Academic All-Amer- 
ican. Junior returnees include Suzie 
Seanor (Greensburg, Pa.) and Joyce 
Kozusko (Pgh-Plum). Seanor, a two 
year letterwinner, also earned hon- 
orable mention all-conference 
honors in 1983 with stats that includ- 
ed 259 "kills" and 55 service aces 
from her outside hitter/middle 
blocker position. Kozusko, also a 
two-year letterwinner, displayed all- 
around versatility with 57 "kills", 92 
"sets" and 22 service aces from her 
outside hitter spot. 

Sophomores make up nearly half 
of Clarion's roster and include Sue 
Anderton (Oil City, Pa.), Karen 
Banks (Pgh-Plum), Maureen Huber 
(York, Pa.) and Wendy Moeslein 
(Pgh-Baldwin). Anderton, an 
outside hitter, had 76 "kills" and 82 
"sets" a year ago while Banks col- 
lected the third most sets on the 
team with 482 from her "setters" po- 
sition. Huber, also an outside hitter, 
had 122 "kills" and 78 "sets" in her 
first year while Moeslein earned 1st 
team all-conference honors as a 
freshman. Wendy registered 212 
"kills" as a middle hitter/middle 
blocker. 



Freshmen ready to contribute for 
the Golden Eagles are Barbara 
Buck (Baden, Pa. - Ambridge) and 
Susan Kurts (Johnstown, Pa.-Rich- 
land) . Buck, projected as an outside 
hitter, was a four-year letterwinner 
at Ambridge High School while 
Kurts, a middle hitter/middle block- 
er, helped Richland High to the 
PIAA "AA" Championship a year 
ago. 

"TTiis team has been great to work 
with," reflected Daniels-Oleksak on 
the young season. "They play with 
every ounce of energy while they're 
on the floor and have set high goals 
for themselves this year. Using our 
experience to our advantage, dis- 
playing poise in critical situations 
and maturing as a team are key 
elements to our success in 1984," 
closed the Clarion coach. 

The 1984 Lady Eagles volleyball 
team is expecting an exciting sea- 
son. This past weekend Sept. 14-15 
they played in a 15-team tournament 
at Mansfield State, where were both 
Division I and II teams in the tour- 
ney. Slippery Rock was at the tour- 
ney and was ranked No. 1 in the West 
and Clarion was ranked No. 2 so the 
competition was good, Mansfield 
was the only other state school in the 
tourney. 

The Lady Eagles opened their 
tournament play against Nazareth 



The Eagle's Den 

Reimer Center 

Clarion University of Pa. 

226-2406 

Open Weekdays 7:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. 

We the staff and management at the Eagle's Den would like to 
express our appreciation to the Golden Eagles as well as all other 
students who devote their time and energies to proudly represent our 
University. Good luck to all! Because we too believe in giving the 
most to have the best, we are getting up extra-early to serve you our 
best breakfast specials and to make your lunches outstanding. 

This week's breakfast special includes: 

Your choice of 2 eggs, toast, and bacon for only $1.30 

or 
2 waffles and medium juice for only $1.10 

Our luncheon specials change daily and will syire please you! 




This week's evening special features 

the only REAL pizza in town, 
our most famous and largest pizza, 
THE 16'* TORPIT 

/or only $4.00 

The Eagle's Den 

Reimer Center - Clarion University of Pa. 

226-2406 

Open Weekdays 7:30 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 



College from New York and won 15- 
4, 15-8. Their second game was 
against Loyola and they lost 14-16, 9- 
15. Their third game was Saturday 
morning against Western Connecti- 
cut and they won 15-4, 15-4. Fourth 
game was against Radford and they 
lost 8-15, 6-15. This finished their pool 
play and gave them a 2-2 record 
which was good enough to put them 
in bracket play where they played 
Juniata and lost 13-15, 4-15. The loss 
against Juniata put them out of tour- 
ney play and gave them an ending 
record of 2-3 from the tournament. 

The Lady Eagles had a scrim- 
mage against Westminster on Fri- 
day, Sept. 7, which they won rather 
easily, 15-5, 15-4, 16-14, 15-4, and 15-8. 
Coach Daniels-Oleksak commented 
on it being a good working scrim- 



mage. 

The next game for the Lady Ea- 
gles is Tuesday against Robert Mor- 
ris and Carlow away. They have a 
tournament Sept. 21-22 at Bucknell, 
and there will be good competition 
there with Division 1 schools. Their 
season home opener will be Satur- 
day, Sept. 29, against Slippery Rock. 
So if you are looking for some excite- 
ment and good entertainment try to 
make it to Tippin Gym at 10 a.m. and 
show the girls some support. 

CLARION NOTES: The Golden 
Eagle captains for 1984 will be Ellen 
Borowy and Suzie Seanor. Clarion's 
first "official" home meet is on Sept. 
29 against 1983 West Champs 
Slippery Rock beginning at 10 
a.m. . . Daniels-Oleksak's Clarion 
record for three years stands at 49- 
47. 



Harriers fall to LH. 



By: Chris Sturnick 
Sports Editor 



The Golden Eagle cross-country 
team opened their season on Satur- 
day with a dual meet against Lock 
Haven. The men lost a close one 27- 
28. It was a tough loss according to 
Coach English not because it was 
one point but because he felt the 
team should have come away with 
the victory. English feels the men 
have the talent to run as a solid 
group through the first seven to 
eight runners. 

The order of finish for Clarion at 
Lock Haven was as follows: coming 
second overall and first for the 
Elagles was Bob Smith with a time of 
26:34; second for Clarion and third 
overall was Scott DeLanney with a 
time of 26:37; third for the Eagles 
and sixth overall was Jim Snyder 
with a time of 27:04; abo tied with 
Jim was Greg Garstecki with a time 
of 27:04, and placing 10th overall and 
fifth for the Eagles was Mark Mur- 
ewski with a time of 27 : 39. 

The Lady Eagles, who are very 
young and just building a squad, had 
a very respectable showing against 



the ladies of Lock Haven with a 
score of 24:31. A very encouraging 
start for the Qarion women was the 
second and third place finishes by 
first year runners Denise Johnson 
and Kerrin Conklin. Other place fin- 
ishes for the Lady Eagles were Sue 
Robertson in seventh, Liz McCul- 
lough in ninth and Karen McFran- 
ahan in 10th. 

Coach English was very satisfied 
with the team's overall perfor- 
mance in this first meet. He was a 
little concerned about how they 
would come through in competition 
as the girls have not competed in two 
years. 



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CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984-15 



Eagle Hackers take second at lUP 



NCAji 



M. 



By: Jeff Harvey 




The Clarion University Golden 
Eagles golf team started action last 
week in a tournament at Gannon 
University. There were 17 teams 
featured in this tournament, with 
Clarion placing second, just one 
stroke behind I.U.P. 

Mike Czap was the medalist for 
the Golden Eagles in the Gannon 
tournament shooting a 69. Other 
players who participated in last 
week's tournament were: Bill Sars- 
field, 75; Don Dimoff, 77; Pete 
Leene, 77; Jim Alcibade, 79, and 
Bruce Chase, 79. 



Members of this year's team who 
did not compete in the Gannon tour- 
ney include Barry Chase, Glenn 
Graham, Jay Czap, Dean Rank, 
Greg Spinetti, John Bean and Mike 
Shatsky. 

Clarion is being coached again this 
year by seven-year mentor Frank 
Lignelli. The Eagles finished third in 
the PSAC West last year but Coach 
Lignelli feels that his team has a 
very good shot at capturing the title 
in '84. 

Clarion's next exhibition will be a 
54-hole tournament at Slippery Rock 
on Sept. 16 and 17. 

Some other tournaments being 



played by the Golden Eagles this 
year will be: September 25 at 
Youngstown, September 27 at Al- 
legheny College, and October 9 at 
Lock Haven. 



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TV college football package may be financial disaster 



As the regular college football 
season and a new era in televised 
college sports begin, many campus 
officials are already complaining 
their programs are losing money. 

Thanks largely to a series of bitter 
lawsuits, battles with television net- 
works and, ultimately, the June, 
1984 U.S. Supreme Court decision to 
let individual schools and confer- 
ences negotiate their own TV con- 
tracts, the 1984 season could start an 
era in which football superpowers 
permanently eclipse the rest of the 
nation's programs, officials say. 

Many already are urging a return 
to the old days of 1983. 

"It's a disaster from an economic 
standpoint," laments Tom Hansen, 
commissioner of the Pacific Athletic 
Conference (Pac 10), whose 10 mem- 
bers will gain little, if anything, 
from the new TV situation. 

"It's obvious there isn't the money 
M fWefe fhat*«hi&f^\*asia^vear," 
adds UCLA sports department 
spokesman Mark Dellins. "It will 
take more appearances for less 
money to match last year." 

"It's caused the NCAA (National 
CoUegiate Athletic Association) and 
all of us a big mess," agrees Jim 
Walden, head football coach at 
Washington State University 
(WSU). 

The "mess" arose from a 1982 
lawsuit against the NCAA, which for 
32 years had negotiated TV 
contracts for all college football 
games. 

Two years ago the universities of 
Oklahoma and Georgia sued the 
NCAA, claiming individual schools 
had the right to say when, where, 
and for what price their football 
teams will appear on TV. 

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 
June that the NCAA's exclusive con- 
trol over football TV rights was, 
indeed, an illegal monopoly. 

Now individual schools — or 
groups of schools like the Pac 10 and 
Big 10 conferences — frantically are 
negotiating their own deals with 
major networks, cable systems, and 
regional TV stations. And most ob- 
servers fear that when the dust 
finally settles few teams will be 
better off than under the NCAA's 
voided TV plan. 

"If everything goes right, we'll 
come close to breaking even with 
last year," says the Pac lO's Hansen. 

Nationwide, colleges will lose 




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about $40 million in TV money this 
year, according to NCAA President 
Jon Toner. 

"I think our members are feeling 
an economic crunch as a result of 
the new TV play," NCAA spokesman 
Dave Cawood adds. 

Toner estimates colleges this year 
will make only about half of the $78 
million in TV revenues they would 
have made under the old NCAA ar- 
rangement. 

In a kind of exclusive, upper crust 
version of the NCAA, the College 
Football Association (CFA) — com- 
prised of 63 major football powers — 
recently negotiated a $21 million 
deal to have ABC broadcast its 
games. 

The Pac 10 and Big 10 conferences 
have likewise signed a $10 million 
deal to broadcast 16 games over 
CBS. 

Other schools — lacking the clout 
aftd popularity of the CFA, Pac 10 
and Big 10 teams — are signing con- 
tracts with TV stations and cable 
networks to broadcast their games 
regionally. 

WSU, for instance, will earn about 
$600,000 in regional TV revenues this 
year, says coach Walden, $200,000 
less than last year. 

And worse, Walden adds, because 
the superpower teams h ave sched- 
uled most of the prime network TV 
time, "we have no room to get on 
(national) TV even if we do great 
later in the season." 

""Die big teams are getting all the 
exposure, and my team is being 
shortchanged," he charges. "That's 



just not fair to my players." 

"Numerous, less-prominent in- 
stitutions with fine football pro- 
grams are now essentially shut out 
of any significant participation in 
the market for television," Toner 
says, creating a "panorama of 
diminishing opportunity." 

Even Boston College, which last 
year earned over $1.5 million in four 
TV appearances, this year might 
appear eight times to make $750,000, 
according to BC head football coach 
Jack Bicknell. 

The new conflicts, moreover, have 
colleges suing one another over 
which teams will appear on which 
network under whose TV contract. 

UCLA, Southern Cal, the Big 10 
and Pac 10, are suing ABC because it 
won't allow CFA members to appear 
on CBS when they play against USC 
and UCLA this fall. 

The CFA "has offered compro- 
mises to get the games on TV," 
insists CFA spokesman Dick Sny- 
der, "but we can't abort our contract 
with ABC." 

Until the suit is decided, schools 
with different TV contracts may not 
be able to televise their games, 
critics say. 

Others can't even get TV 
contracts. 

"We checked with the networks, 
Turner Broadcasting, ESPN, you 
name it, and none of them have any 
intention of covering lesser-known 
college games," says Jim Delany, 
commissioner of the Ohio Valley 
Conference, which consists of Divi- 
sion II schools. 



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Consequently, Ohio Valley 
members will lose "between $400,000 
and $600,000" in TV revenues this 
fall, Delany says. 

The chaos has made many sports 
officials ready to bring back the 
NCAA as their exclusive negotiating 
agent. 

"I think we're all giving the NCAA 
more credit than it got a year ago," 
says WSU's Walden. "I hope we can 
come up with some new plan that 
would allow the NCAA to get us out 
of this for next year." 

In the meantinie, he gripes, "I 
wouldn't be very proud of myself if I 
were Georgia or Oklahoma." 

A Congressional subcommittee is 
considering legislation to overrule 



the Supreme Court and allow the 
NCAA to estabUsh a "legal" mono- 
ply over college football TV rights. 

"This is a new era in college foot- 
ball, and one that's still too early to 
assess," says subcommittee aide 
Jerry Waldron. "It's something that 
will be closely followed by Congress 
this year, and if there's too much 
abuse (Congress) may well consider 
passing a law to correct the situa- 
tion." 



Sports Tip 
2380 



The Eagle's Den 
& CAB'S 

would like to thank the 

residents and the Staff of 

FOREST MANOR 

for sponsoring last week's successful dance. 

We look forward to another 
entertaining evening 

This Saturday, Sept. 22 

when 
NAIR HALL sponsors 

Clarion's Alternative Bar 

from 9 p.m. until 12:30a.m. 



*Cab's continues to 
provide the 
excitement on 
campus. 



*Get there 
early to beat 
the crowd. 

*Candle light dancing 
*non-alcoholic Mixed Drinks 



^ 



Eagle's Den 

Reimer Center 
Clarion University of Pa. 



•■• ' ■■.*.''.*.►.'■.*■. '^,^.?.»'. J.''. >^. A ''.'',«'.'*.', if.'. 



'.'.».<».■'.* *.''.»^4'.v. 




16-CLARION'S CALL, Clarion, Pa., Thursday, Sept. 20, 1984 




Gridders conquer Titans 15-10 



By: Mike Kondracki 



Pat Carbol, one of three quarterbacks for Saturday's game, sets up to beat the 
Titans. Photo by Ray Baker 



The Golden Eagles' offensive unit 
engineered a fourth quarter scoring 
drive to capture a come-from-behind 
victory over Westminster 15-10. 

After a scoreless first quarter, the 
Golden Eagles drew first blood on a 
22-yard field goal by Eric Fair- 
banks. 

Westminster came back on their 
next possession, and following a 
roughing-the-passer penalty knotted 
the game at 3 on a 25-yard field goal. 
Westminster added 7 more points on 



a 14-yard touchdown pass late in the 
second quarter to take a 10-3 half- 
time lead. 

The third quarter, however, was 
scoreless, and marred by penalties 
and miscues by both teams. 

The Golden Eagles brought them- 
selves within one point with 8:04 left 
in the fourth quarter on an eight- 
yard pass from Pat Carbol to Mike 
Kuzilla. The two-point conversion 
failed, however. 

On the next possession Westmin- 
ster was forced to punt, and this set 
the stage for the winning drive. The 
Golden Eagl^ marched 58 yards in 



11 plays, capped off by a 1-yard 
touchdown run by Pat Carabol, to se- 
cure the victory. 

The Golden Eagles opened up 
their 1984 football campaign on the 
road against Fairmont State a week 
and a half ago, where they defeated 
the Falcons 21-13. 

Pat Carbol completed eight of 16 
passes for 170 yards, four of them to 
receiver Bob Green and Elton 
Brown gained 61 yards rushing to 
lead the offensive attack. 

Jim Trovato registered two 
quarterback sacks to lead the de- 
fensive unit. 



Ewing named PSAC-West 
player of the week 




Clarion University middle guard 
(noseguard) Kevin Ewing has been 
named as the Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference (PSAC) 
Western Division "Player of the 
Week", after his outstanding per- 
formance in the Golden Eagles 15-10 
win on Saturday against Westmins- 
ter. 

Ewing, a 6-0, 210 lb., senior middle 
guard from Penn Hills, Pa., led a 
stellar defensive performance Sat- 
urday by making 14 tackles, record- 
ing three quarterback sacks for -21 
yards and recovering two fumbles, 
the last of which clinched victory for 
Clarion. In all, the Golden Eagles' 
co-captain (Ewing) led a defense 
that throttled the Titans' offense, 
limiting Westminster to 76 yards 
passing and minus 13 yards (-13) 
rushing on 31 carries, a total offense 
of 63 yards. 

In 1984, Ewing leads the defense 
with 28 tackles (12 solo), plus has 
registered four qb sacks and recov- 
ered two fumbles. A 1982 and 83 AP 
Honorable Mention All-America se- 
lection, Ewing has also been a 1st 
team All-Conference choice both 
years and likewise has been a Pitts- 
burgh Press All-District selection. 
In his career (including the first two 
games in 84), Ewing has totalled 348 
tackles and 34 qb sacks in 27 games, 
or 12.9 tackles and 1.3 qb sacks per 



game. 

"Kevin played an outstanding 
game Saturday," commented 
Qarion head coach Gene Sobolew- 
ski. "He possesses outstanding 
quickness and technique, plus 
applies relentless pressure with his 
pursuit." 

The Golden Eagles, who won the 
1983 PSAC Title and entered 1984 
ranked by Sports Illustrated as the 
third best team in the NCAA Divi- 
sion II Pre-Season Poll, are off to a 2- 
start having bested Fairmont State 
(W.Va.) 21-13 and Westminster 15- 
10. 

Ewing, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Kier G. Ewing of Penn Hills, is a 
Finance Major at Clarion. 

CLARION NOTES: The Golden 
Eagles were also chosen as having 
the "Play of the Week" in the Penn- 
sylvania Conference. . .The play 
came in the fourth quarter against 
Westminster, with Clarion trailing 
10-9 and ready to receive a Titan 
punt. . .Titan punter Kevin Gribbin 
hit a punt that crossed midfield and 
struck comer John Rice on top of his 
helmet, then caromed back to safety 
Jerry Haslett, who was readying to 
field the punt. Haslett reacted 
quickly to snag the pigskin and re- 
turn it near the 50. The play was 
important in that Clarion used that 
possession to score and win the 



game. . .West Chester's Mike Irving 
was named the East Player of the 
Week running for 106 yards on 22 
rushes (one touchdown) and a 95 
yard kickoff return for a td in beat- 
ing Glassboro State. 




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VOL 56 NO. 3 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, September, 27, 1984 



CJUhJM/ iij)UiHUJ(tf ofy f^ejuiA^flwutiOy 




Wachob opens Clarion office 



By Mike Callahan 



Bill Wachob, the 23rd District 
Democratic candidate for Congress, 
has opened a campaign headquar- 
ters at 1099 East Main Street in 
Clarion because, "He thinks Clarion 
is a key county in the race." 

Mr. Wachob explained to friends 
and supporters why he thinks 
Clarion is such an important county 
in his campaign. He started by say- 
ing, "I am only five or six percent- 
age points behind my opponent, Wil- 
liam Clinger, with seven weeks to go 
before the election." He finds this 
very encouraging because half of 



Clarion County's voters are still un- 
accounted for. Mr. Wachob also 
said, "I feel I will have a very excit- 
ing, energetic, ultimate campaign in 
Clarion County." 

In an interview, after Mr. 
Wachob's speech, "I feel that the 
number one priority of the people in 
this county should be the education 
of the young people." He also added, 
"Our educational systems should be 
upgraded by adequately financing 
our teachers." 

Mr. Wachob will be on campous in 
the future to talk to and answer 
questions from CUP students and 
faculty. 



Netters top California 



By John Casey 



The Clarion women's tennis team 
won two matches with a tremendous 
6-3 victory over California in a Tri- 
Match held on the home courts 
Saturday. 

Clarion started off on the wrong 
foot by l(^tng to their early morning 
opponents Gannon 7-2. Phil Popiel- 
ski, the women's manager, predict- 
ed Gannon's victory because "they 
showed up with expensive rackets." 
Fighting those inevitable odds, 
freshman sensation Suzie Fritz dom- 
inated her opponent, Jennifer Kipp- 
ley 6-1, 6-3, and the doubles team of 
Dawn Funya and Kim DeMaio 
soundly defeated their cross court 



rivals 10-2 in 10 game pro set scor- 
ing. 

Gannon then went on to defeat 
California in the warm afternoon 
sun 8-1, while the Golden Eagles sat 
idle, preparing for their next match. 

The California women, decked in 
their white Izod tennis uniforms, 
stood surprised as they watched a 
strong enthusiastic Clarion team 
take charge. Kim DeMaio and Sue 
Reeder each won their singles 
matches, and Lynn Fye trampled 
Sue Lewandowski 6-1, 6-0. Lisa 
Thompson, on her way to chalking 
up another victory for Clarion, had 
to default after a 6-2 win in the first 
set because of a twisted knee. 
See Netters, Page 14 




Lynn Frye, co-captain of the Clarion women's tennis team, reaches for a victory. 

photo by Renee Rosensteel 




Bill Wachob (right), the 23rd District Democratic candidate for Congress, cuts the ribbon to open his new campaign 
headquarters on East Main Street. Senator David Wright and Paari Minich, Democratic Chaimnan of Clarion County 
look on. Photo by Allison Boss 

Anderson to speak at Clarion 



By Kevin McCullough 



John Anderson, a former presi- 
dential candidate and congressman, 
will speak at Clarion University's 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on 
Monday, Oct. 1 at 8: 15 p.m. The pro- 
gram is sponsored by the University 
Center Board, and is free to the 
public. 

As a congressman from Illinois in 
the 60's, Anderson broke away from 
his conservative ideology most dra- 
matically by casting a vote which 
broke the Deadlock Rules Com- 
mittee and reported out the Open 
House Bill of 1968. 

During the 1970's, Congressman 
Anderson represented the ideas and 
principles of Social Reform, Fiscal 
Responsibility, Human Rights and 



National Unity. His support for the 
Equal Rights Amendment, Cam- 
paign Financing Form, and Open 
House Incentives were character- 
istics of Anderson's principles. 

In 1978, Anderson decided to run 
as an Independent in the Presiden- 
tial Election rather than pursue the 
nomination as the candidate. He won 
5.7 million votes in the 1980 election 
and later formed the National Union 
Party. 

Since the election, Anderson has 
continued to speak out on important 
public issues at colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the country. In 
addition to public speaking Ander- 
son is writing a book concerned with 
his ideas on restoring the U.S. econ- 
omy and America's position in the 
world. 




John Anderson 



Thea tre ' 'ca ts"to perform 
"on a hot tin roof" 



The CUP Players will be present- 
ing Cat on a Hot Tin Roof on Oct. 2 
thru 4 and a special performance for 
the "Over 100" Celebration. 

The play takes place in a bed- 
sitting room of a plantation home in 
the Mississippi Delta, in 1955. 

The cast from this show is proud to 
be in the Bob Copeland "Over 100" 
celebration. This event is to congrat- 
ulate Bob for starting the B.F.A. 
Acting and Technical/Design 
Degree here at Clarion in 1978. Bob 
has directed over 126 plays and has 
also starred in quite a few. Copeland 
has the challenge of directing this 
play and also playing the part of Big 
Daddy. 

The other players consist of Sybil 
Wein as Big Mamma. Sybil is one of 
the charter members of the College/ 
Community players that got started 
in 1959. George J. Jaber, a 1977 



graduate of Clarion and presently 
employed as an assistant professor 
of Performing Arts, plays the part of 
Brick. Brick is being understudied 
by Ronald M. Slanina. Irma M. Levy 
is Brick's wife, Margaret. Irma is a 
junior theatre major here at Clarion. 
The Part of Mae, the constantly 
pregnant daughter-in-law is played 
by Barb Griffin, a graduating 
senior. Barb's everloving husband 
Cooper is portrayed by Ron Hartley 
one of the department members. 
The two servants, Sookey and 
Lacey, are Doris M. Hazzard and 
Peter Ojomo, both newcomers to the 



C.U.P. stage. The children are being 
played by Diedre P-Jobb and Sean 
Hufford as Dixie and Buster respec- 
tively. Rev. Tooker is played by 
David Knapp, a transfer from Butler 
County Community College, and 
Doctor Baugh is the familiar Randy 
V. Rocco. 

Tickets are available in 104 
Reimer daily from 1-4 p.m. CUP 
student tickets are free with valid ID. 
Adult admission will be $4 and chil- 
dren under 12 are admitted for $2. 
For more information contact Alice 
Qover at 165 Marwick-Boyd or call 
226-2284. 



ON THE INSIDE 

Editorial 2 Introducing ... 

Laundromats 3 Clwndier Menu 

Campaign '84 4 Volleyball 

intorstato 80 7 Football 



.9 
10 
IS 
16 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 




There were two assault and rape incidents repxDrted and a third 
incident rumored in just the few weeks we've been back at school 
And there was an astonishingly high number of reported rapes in 
Clarion since July. These incidents are just the reported ones and 
have somewhat sketchy statistics - almost as if they aren't real; 
almost as if there isn't a problem at all. 

But rape is a real crime and rape is a real violation of another per- 
son. And it's a real problem in Clarion. 

The other day an excellent suggestion of an escort service was 
given to me; a su^estion Fd like to expand on. My plan involves: 

'the members of Inter Fraternal Council, Pershing Rifles, ROTC, 
the football and other athletic teams, and all interested males to or- 
ganize an escort service. 

*the escort service participants take two-hour shifts Sunday 
through Thursday evenings at the library and be available to walk any 
gM to her dorm, apartment or to a friend's house. 

*a Centrex phone be installed in the lobby of Carlson for late 
night studiers to contact someone to walk with or to let someone 
know that she/he is on her/his way home alone. 

*an office in Egbert be made available in the evenings for escort 
service participants to assist more folks, in addition to library patrons. 

My home is near Philadelphia and Fd become rather desensitized 
to the numerous daily reports of assault and rape. When I transferred 
to Clarion. I figured there would be little crime in this small 
ccMTimunity. I know better now. 

I have mastered two self-defense courses and I have enou^ con- 
fkknce in myself to get out of a bad situation. But I also have the 
smarts enough to walk with someone at night or in well lighted areas 
if I must walk alone. 

Common sense tells us not to walk outside at night alone, but 
too many folks chance this simple idea because often you can't find 
someone willing to walk along. The escort service takes the simple 
idea and makes it more possible. Think of the many people you could 
meet and the friends to be made just through a common cause 
safety. 

There's still safety to keep in mind even if the escort service never 
materializes. Girls, if you have to be out at night alone, be smart - 
carefully ball your keys in your fist and walk with determination, like 
you have some place to be, not with your head down, which indicates 
vulnerability. And fellas, if your girlfriend made the effort to come and 
see you, make the effot to see that she gets home safely tonight - be- 
cause it'll be nice to see her tomorrow. Karen E Hale 



(^The Clarion Call 

\j^ Room 1 Harvey Hall 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Ediforin-Chief KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Features Editor MICHFLE LaTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIi 3TURNICK. 

Photography Editor CHUCK LIZZA 



Ad Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

. Circulation Manager DENISE SHEEKY 

Advisor ART BARLOW 

Consulting Editor THERESA WAIDA 

The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with th. r.chool calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising Rater 

IXeplay Ads: Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Par Agate Line $ 34 



Mail Subscription Rates: 

Per Semester $5 

Per Academic Year $8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 



Comm. dept adopts new policy 



By Christine Minder 



Recently, the Communications 
Department has altered the policy 
on the required co-curricular credits 
for communication majors. 

The old policy required four co- 
curricular credits, two print and two 
broadcast, which must be fulfilled 
before graduation. 

The new policy involves only two 
co-curricular credits, one print and 
one broadcast, which must be finish- 
ed within the student's first four 
semesters. This switch goes into 
effect this semester and applies to 
all students. 

The reasoning behind the switch is 
linked with the increasing number of 
communication majors and the 
appeal from media organizations 
who cannot handle the increasing 
load, according to Dr. Larson. There 
are not enough media organizations 
on campus to accommodate these 
numbers. 

Ck)mmunication majors have risen 
in population from 300 in 1980 to 
approximately 550 now. No new 
media organizations have been 
added to help curb this load. 

Also, more non-communication 
majors are joining the organizations 
but as always involvement for inter- 
ested students is promoted. 

Dr. Larson strongly encourages 
participation in all media organi- 
zations varying from print to broad- 
cast so the student can obtain a 
broad background. He suggests at 



least seven co-curricular credits for 
"hands on experience." 

The new rule will hopefully in- 
crease positions for hard working, 
interested students and decrease the 
percentage of disinterested students 
that just join the organizations for 
credit. 

When Dr. Larson was asked why 
the new requirement must be ful- 
filled within the first four semesters, 
he replied that it would get the stu- 
dents involved early and hopefully 
be an encouragement to continue 



within the various organizations. 

The two-cocurricular rule also 
gives communication majors the 
opportunity to explore different 
clubs that will be of benefit but do 
not fulfill the co-curricular credit. 

Approval of the suggestion first 
went through a process that started 
with the faculty of the Communica- 
tion Department then on to the dean 
which handed it to the Committee on 
Courses and Programs of Study 
which went to the Faculty Senate 
then finally to President Bond. 



Homecoming set 



By Joel Clickner 



Qarion University is preparing 
for a large turnout for the approach- 
ing homecoming festivities. Student 
involvement is expected to be large 
for the Oct. 13 event. 

There will be at least 10 campus 
organizations entering floats in the 
ALF parade. Also, several other 
groups have expressed interest in 
builcUng floats, but as yet have not 
been assigned building sites or flat- 
beds for their floats. 

All of the campus residence halls, 
except Forest Manor, as well as sev- 
eral of the fraternities and soror- 
ities, campus media organizations, 
and other organizations will be rep- 
resented in this year's parade. 
There will also be entries from 
groups who have not previously had 



Foster children to receive 
complimentary tickets 



By Theresa M. Waida 



Nearly 40 Qarion County foster 
children and their foster parents are 
now able to attend University foot- 
ball games, compliments of "the 
team that cares". 

This decision has been made 
through the combined efforts of Ath- 
letic Director Frank Lignelli and 
Qarion County Foster Care Coor- 
dinator Tamarra Brothers. 

The Children and Youth Services 
of Qarion County help to move chil- 
dren from their natural home into 



the care of foster families while do- 
mestic problems are being solved. 
Tlie children range from birth to 17 
years of age. 

"Our agency would like to give 
utmost thanks to CUP for their con- 
tinued support of foster families 
within Qarion County," said Broth- 
ers. Tickets will be made available 
to all those participating in the pro- 
gram beginning Oct. 29. The Chil- 
dren and Youth Agency must be con- 
tacted at least one week in advance. 

Brothers is a graduate of Oarion 
University of Pennsylvania with a 
degree in elementary education. 



floats, such as PSEA and Peace 

Applications from groups inter- 
ested in entering a float in the par- 
ade are due by Friday, Sept. 28. 
See Homecoming, Page 7 

Get started at the 
Carlson info, desk 

Getting started can be the hardest 
part of a project. A new library ser- 
vice, "TTie Information Desk" is 
intended to alleviate that problem 
^en it comes to library use. Cen- 
trally located on the main floor of 
the library, the desk is staffed 
during the busiest hours of library 
use. Librarians are available to 
assist users in locating library re- 
sources (books, periodicals, and 
media) through use of card catalogs, 
bibliographies, and other guides to 
the library collection. Gerard 
McCabe, Director of Libraries, is en- 
thusiastic about this new outreach 
service and plans to eventually ex- 
tend Information Desk service hours 
through use of graduate student 
staffing. 

CORRECTION 

In the Sept. 20 issue of The Clar- 
ion Call. Ms. Judy Hinga was incor- 
rectly identified in a headline as a 
new staff member for the Writing 
Staff. 

Ms. Judy Hinga recently jomed 
the Counseling and Career Planning 
Center. Her new duties will include 
individual, personal and career 
counseling to students and staff and 
developing a variety of outreach 
programs to residence halls and stu- 
dent organisations on campus. 






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Th« old iaundramat (top) has boon torn down to maks room for a new 7-11 store. Th« A & M Laundry (below) is nearing 
complstion. photos by BUI Alberter and Eric Watson 

Popular Iaundramat closes, 
new laundry prepares to open 



By Cheryl Floyd 



The Iaundramat located on the 
corner of Greenville and Main 
Street has been permanently closed 
to make room for a new 7-11 conven- 
ience store. The owner of the laun- 
dromat, Keith Martin, has put many 
hours of work into the upkeep of the 
Iaundramat and is quite disappoint- 
ed that it had to be closed. 

His lease, which rtms until March 
1986, will be paid off by the 7-11 fran- 
chise. Martin felt it would not have 
been wise to stay open due to the fu- 
ture construction of the new store 
and saw the offer he received as 
being a more advantageous route to 
take. 

With the zoning ordinance pres- 



ently in effect in Qarion, the only 
possible location of a new laundro- 
mat would be on East Main Street. If 
an ideal locale arises, Martin may 
consider opening another laundro- 



mat but at the present time, has no to close down. 



plans to do so. 

Martin stated he feels he provided 
a very good service for off-campus 
students who were very good to him 
but under the circumstances, he had 



ALLEGHENY WOMEN'S CENTER 

an out patient medical clinic offering 
• Abortion — asleep or awake 

• Morning After Treatment 

• Birth Control 

• Related Services 

PHONE 412/362-2920 



mn 



ttegheny 
omen's 



Medical Center East Building 
Penthouse Right (8th floor) 
211 North Whitfield Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984-3 

Leghold traps may 
be banned in Pa. 



By Jim Pablo 



On Monday, Sept. 17, at the Main 
Capitol Building in Harrisburg, a bill 
was introduced to ban the leghold 
trap in Pennsylvania. 

The legislation was brought up by 
Trans-Species Unlimited, which is a 
national animal rights group, that 
wants to eliminate the severe cause 
of trapped animals' suffering. 
Sponsored by Rep. Thomas J. 
Murphy Jr., the bill will prohibit the 
sale, possession, use, import, and 
transportation of all leghold traps 
within Pennsylvania. All leghold 
traps of any kind must be surrender- 
ed to a law enforcement agency 
upon or before the effective date of 
the bill. Mouse and rat traps used in 
or under a building will not be clas- 
sified as leghold traps under the pro- 
visions of the bill. 



Not only is Pennsylvania the se- 
cond largest trapping state in the 
country, but it is the home of Wood- 
stream Corporation, the largest 
manufacturer in the world of leghold 
traps. 

The Murphy Bill is not an anti- 
trapping bill, but an anti-cruelty bill. 
Alternatives for trapping would be 
the box trap which is readily avail- 
able. Some trappers believe that fur- 
bearers are next to impossible to 
capture in a box, however the At- 
lanta Center for Disease Control has 
used them for years for study. The 
foot-snare trap, proven to be 
humane, is already being manufac- 
tured by Woodstream in Canada but 
has yet to be done in the U.S. 

Any trapper with any signs of con- 
science or compassion for the 
animal whose skin he profits from 
should support the Murphy Bill. 



Bookstore to give 
away free books 



Beginning Oct. 1, 1984, watch the 
Bookstore's flashing communication 
sign displayed in the window facing 
Wood Street. Each day a different 
trivia question will be on the screen 
beginning at 11 a.m. The question 
must be answered before 2 p.m. in 
the bookstore the same day. Since 
there is only one winner each day, be 
the first to answer correctly and win 
valuable merchandise and/or gift 
certificates. 

After Nov. 30, all daily winners 



wUl be entered in a QUIZ-OFF at 
Reimer Center. Single elimination 
rules will apply, whereby answering 
correctly enables the player to con- 
tinue and an incorrect answer elim- 
inates him. Play will continue until 
only one person remains. 

TTiat person will be considered the 
wirmer and will receive free text- 
books for the following semester. 

Everyone is invited to attend the 
QUIZ-OFF, which will be scheduled 
and announced at a later date. 





4-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 



1984 Autumn Leaf Festival 
undergoing numerous clianges 



By Nancy Vmbaugh 



Clarion is buzzing with only two 
weeks left to put the final touches on 
this year's Autumn Leaf Festival. 

One of the highlights will be the 
appearance of news anchorwoman 
Patti Burns, from KDKA-TV in 
Pittsburgh. Other celebrities slated 
to appear at this year's festival are 
weather forecaster Joe DeNardo 
and Senators Bob Kusse, Pat Staple- 
ton and Tim Shaffer. 

Many of the old-time patrons, and 
new as well, are in for some changes 
in this year's festivities. The dispo- 
sal of the oak leaf design, which has 
been used for the past 12 years, is 
one of the biggest changes. This 
design is being replaced by yellow, 
(H*ange and red banners. 

Clarion Chamber of Commerce 
Executive Director Joy Dunbar- 
Fueg said, "We felt there was a void 
in entertainment for young teens," 
so, an indoor rock concert has been 
scheduled. This event is a first in 
ALF history. 

Other changes include several 
new events: a petting zoo of 
animals, glass exhibits that date 
l)ack 50 years, a ladies' amateur 
golf tourney, and a Clarion River 
boat tour. 

A NASA display, featuring a 
mock-up of the planet Mars and the 
space craft Challenger, will be on 
show most of the festival week at the 
Clarion County Courthouse. 

Sandy Dye, owner of Knot 'N Plant 
in Clarion, will be the chief speaker 
at a "Women in Business Confer- 
«ice" being held at Clarion Univer- 
sity on Oct. 8. 

On the weekend of Oct. 13 and 14, 
the concluding events for this gala 




Patti Burns will be in Clarion for this year's Autumn Leaf Festival. 

photo courtesy of Clarion Chamber of Commerce 



spectacular will occur. On that 
Saturday the Autumn Leaf Festival 
Parade and the Clarion University 
homecoming football game will take 
place, respectively. 

The majority of people involved in 
putting on the ALF are volunteers. 



These people include local mer- 
chants, civic organizations, and 
members of the university com- 
munity. 

The festival, running Oct. 6 
through Oct. 14, is expected to draw 
a crowd of 100,000 people. 



RED STALLION 

"Magic 96" 
Party 

Saturday, Sept. 29 



*The Magic Magician 

•Prizes 

*Hat8 

*TShirt8 

*Kill-the Keg Party 

* Guest D.J. ^ 
*96 minutes of / 

* Sponsored by the Miller Brewing Go. 



Absolutely No Cover Charge 




By Michael J. Downing 



There is one thing I cannot fault 
Ronald Reagan for and that is not 
being a man of his word. 

He promised to build the Defense 
budget. He did so dramatically. 

He said he would improve our 
nation's highways and bridges. The 
construction on Interstate 80 (during 
an election year) also shows that he 
keeps his word. 

He never said he would strive to 
improve relations with the Soviets 
and he has not. He has always taken 
a tough stand with them and he still 
clings fast to that attitude. 

He never said that he would aid 
college students and federal college 
aid has been reduced. 

Reagan also has said that he 
would reduce taxes. Initially, he did 



so, only to propel the deficit to 
astronomical heights. The deficit for 
this year is projected at $180 billion. 

Yes, Ronald Reagan has kept his 
word. 

Now, if Walter Mondale gets a 
chance to keep his, we'll see some 
very different things. First, we will 
see a definite tax hike to reduce the 
deficit. This tax increase would hit 
the well-to-do the hardest. 

We will also see women and 
minorities (primarily Blacks) rise 
to positions of power. He has already 
shown his tendency by selecting a 
woman VP and by generating close 
ties with the black communities. 

So, as far as the tax issue goes, the 
two candidates could not be at more 
opposite poles. Reagan wants little 
or no increase and Mondale wants 
large increases and it is up to us to 
select the proper course. 



Cllnger focuses on 
unemployment insurance 



U.S. Rep. William F. Qinger, Jr. 
(R-PA) has told members of the 
House Ways and Means Committee 
that comprehensive reform of the 
nation's unemployoment insurance 
system is necessary because, "it is a 
topic of particular and growing im- 
portance, both to public and private 
policy makers within our region and 
to the millions of workers who 
become unemployed each year 
through no fault of their own." 

Clinger told members of the House 
Subcommittee on Public Assistance 
and Unemployment Compensation 
that serious consideration should be 
given to a number of recommen- 
dations which the task force has 
drafted. 

Thoie recommendations includ- 
ed: 

^^establishing a new, permanent 
unified program of extended un- 
employment insurance benefits, 
replacing the existing system of sep- 
arate extended and federal supple- 
mental benefits. They would allow 
for swift and prompt reaction to 
major economic dislocations be- 
cause a permanent program of ex- 
tended compensation, triggered 
automatically by a state's unem- 
ployment rate, ahready would be in 
place. 

**changing the financing of the 
program so that as a state's un- 
employment rate increases, the 



federal government pays an increas- 
ing share of the benefits. 

**making states with the highest 
unemployment eligible for the great- 
est number of weeks of benefits. 

•♦incentives for job search, 
training and retraining. 

"Unemployment is a national 
problem, one caused, to a large ex- 
tent, by trade, fiscal, and monetary 
policies that cannot be solved at the 
state or local level. It is not fair that 
high unemployment states ah-eady 
hardest hit by the recession and in 
dire economic straits also should be 
forced into financial disarray in 
order to provide benefits to tiieir 
long-term unemployed. It should be 
recognized that this situation 
usually results in ever-increasing 
state payroll taxes which serve as 
disincentives for employers to add 
new employees to their payrolls and 
may even lead to greater unemploy- 
ment — with the greatest increase in 
taxes falling on those states which 
have the most severe economic 
problems and are in the most need of 
new hiring," said Cllnger. 

NEWS TIP 
2380 




Wachob and Clinger 
focus on jobs 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984—5 



By Karen A. Bauer 



State Representative Bill Wachob 
is focusing on employoment and 
economic well-being in his quest for 
United States Congressman. "There 
is no issue in this election rpore fun- 
damental or more important than 
the economy — jobs for every person 
who wants to work, long-term econo- 
mic growth, long-term industrial 
productivity, and a stable economic 
environment." 

Wachob will run against incum- 
bent William Clinger for U.S. Con- 
gressman in the 23rd District. In his 
first address, on Sept. 14 at Rocky 
Grove Fire Hall, he spoke at length 
on the economy. "The now stagnant 
industries that have been hurt by 
economic recession and by foreign 
competition need to be revitalized, 
and they need to compete in the 
world market again; we need long- 
term job opportunities and long- 
term solutions — but we also need an 
emergency jobs program to relieve 
the terrible suffering that sustained 
double-digit unemployment has 
caused in our district. We also need 
to be able to use the resources we 
have, and we have a great abun- 
dance of coal. Beyond this, we need 
an economy where people bear their 
fair share of the economic burdens 
— not the whole share of it, as many 
of the unemployed and the elderly 
have had to do." 

He also spoke on a possible Na- 
tional Development Corporation to 
provide loans to business and revita- 
lize industry. This corporation would 
be created with a public appropria- 
tion and maintained by private in- 
vestments. 'In addition, I support 
protective trade policies when 
unfair foreign competition results in 



the loss of American jobs," Wachob 
states. 

Wachob feels the federal budget 
deficit is "damaging to our econ- 
omy", that money is " — wasted on 
extremely costly, unnecessary nuc- 
lear weapons systems which are 
actually a threat to our very 
security," and that waste and fraud 
are contributors to economic 
problems. 

dinger's voting record was also 
noted by Rep. Wachob. "The incum- 
bent congressman has consistently 
voted against protecting U.S. jobs 
from unfair foreign competition — 
he voted against domestic content 
requirements in the auto industry, 
he voted against requiring the 
Pentagon to buy U.S. made cars, he 
voted for the Caribbean Basin Initia- 
tive which is having a negative ef- 
fect on the glass industry in our 
region." 

However, Cong. Clinger recently 
received the "Guardian of Small 
Business" Award from the National 
Federation of Independent Business 
(NFIB). The NFIB is the largest 
small business group in the nation, 
representing 20,873 small business 
owners in Pennsylvania, as well as 
over half million independent busi- 
nesses in the United States. 

John Sloan, NFIB President, an- 
nounced the award, "The voting 
record of Rep. Clinger throughout 
this Congress demonstrates that he 
is responsive to the needs of his 
state, because small businesses cre- 
ate the majority of new jobs and, if 
left to flourish, will continue to be 
the driving force behind this 
country's resurgent economic 
growth." 



Writing center provides 
help for all students 



By Shaun Ryan 



Having problems writing what you 
want to say? Is there anyone to as- 
sist you in constructing that paper 
for your political science class? 
Trying to figure out how to begin 
your resume? There's no need to 
worry - the Writing Center is here to 
help you. 

The Writing Center is that long 
white building between Tippin 
Gymnasium and Peirce Science 
Center. It's open Monday through 
Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. to help 
you iron out any potential English- 
related problems you might have. 

According to John Casey, who 
works at the Center, there are nine 
tutors available. Each one has been 
recommended for his job by the 
English Department. They will eag- 
erly help students with such 
problems as composition, grammar, 
spelling, punctuation, and writing 
resumes; though they will not ac- 
tually proofread a paper. The 
service is free of charge to all stu- 
dents. 

The Writing Center has a file 
cabinet full of guides, literature, and 
sample papers available to be used 
as references. These guides were 
compUed by the tutors. 

Casey said that a student needing 
he^ can either make an afvoint- 



ment or just walk in "off the street." 
He went on to say that they have had 
a high rate of success, especially 
among foreign students trying to be- 
ter understand the English 
language. 

A student may voluntarily go to 
the Writing Center for help or be 
recommended to go there by a 
professor. In either case, he should 
not be embarrassed. Rod Keefer, 
another tutor, said that the atmo- 
sphere is informal and relaxed. A 
student is assisted by peers. 

Currently under the direction of 
Kathy Osterholm, the non-profit or- 
ganization has been open five years. 

Why not join the ranks of those 
who have ah*eady benefitted from 
this helpful organization? Remem- 
ber, it's there for your benefit. 




B«cht Hail was almost torn down in 1971 but it still stands today. 



Clarion Call file photo 



Becht Hall was slated to 
close with a bash in 1971 



By Lisa Capello 



What would it be like without 
Becht Hall? Thirteen years ago 
Clarion students were contemplat- 
ing the same question because in 
January 1971, Becht Hall was being 
closed down as a dormitory. To pay 
their final tribute to the old hall, 
Becht residents decided to hold a 
Bye-Bye Becht Bash which drew 
over 200 people. At the festivity skits 
were performed and even a song en- 
titled "Bye-Bye Becht" was sang to 
commemorate the occasion. 

The history of Becht Hall started 
in 1908. Back then it was called 
Navarre Hall and not until 1925 was 
it renamed Becht. The hall was built 
by Clarion Normal School and its red 
tiJe roof and light bricks made the 
Spanish-French style building con- 
trast with the other buildings on 
campus. In addition to living accom- 
modations, the dormitory included 
offices, parlors, reception hall and a 
dining hall which was in use until 
1960. 

Study hours were from 7 p.m. to 
9:45 p.m. and students were expect- 
ed to retire at 1 a.m. No visitors 
were allowed during study hours and 
male visitors were never permitted 
in the rooms. Women were not 
allowed off school grounds with the 
opposite sex unless permission was 
obtained from the principal. 

In 1971, when Becht was supposed 
to be closed, the rooms were survey- 
ed to see what had to be done in 



order to convert them for other uses. 
The offices on the first floor were to 
remain and the building was to be 
used as housing for visiting swim 
teams. 

What would it be like without 
Becht Hall? Well that question has 
never been answered because today 
Becht Hall ^till remains a women's 



dormitory on campus. It never did 
close. 

Our campus has changed a lot 
since the early 1900's. This includes 
the name, our educational system, 
and unfortunately the price of our 
school. But there's one thing that 
never has changed, and that's Becht 
Hall as Clarion's campus landmark. 



Lt. Gov. Scranton to speak here 



On Thursday, Sept. 27, the Clarion 
University College Republicans will 
host a reception for our Lieutenant 
Governor, William W. Scranton III. 
The Lieutenant Governor will arrive 



jn campus at 9: 15 a.m. and will pro- 
ceed to Carter Auditorium, Still 
Hall. The reception will last for one- 
half hour. Coffee and doughnuts will 
be served. 



NEVA SLIKE BEAUTY SALON 

149 MADISON STREET, CLARION, PA 16214 
PHONE 226-4833 



riAIKwU I ■■■■••■■■«■ 

PERM 

HOURS: 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Mon.-Sat. 

Jane, Jill and Neva 



. . . $6.00 
$25-$45 




DITZ'S 

(Next to Post Office) 

Students you are always welcome to 
come in and see our large selection of 
cards, stationery, and unusual gifts. 






GAMES NIGHT 

•refreshments 

•music 
•board games 

FRIDAY, SEPT. 28, 1984 
8:00P.M.-12A.M. 

REIMER COFFEE HOUSE 

REIMER CENTER 
CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PA. 




6— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 



Wachob and dinger battle over superfund 



By Philip Shropshire 



Haven has received the most notor- 

iety. 

State Rep. Bill Wachob — a con- Waste sites here in Pennsylvania 
gressional candidate vying for the and throughout the country should 



23rd district seat — says that his 
opponent, incumbent U.S. Rep. 
WiUiam F. Clinger Jr. (R-PA), is no 
friend of the environment because of 
the congressman's vote on several 



be cleaned up yesterday, if not soon- 
er, says Representative Clinger. 

"Midnight dumping has been 
going on all across this country for a 
decade now, much of that poisonous 



Superfund related issues that were glop is bubbling up to the surface or 

finding its way into the water sup- 
plies," says Clinger. 

"This new bill, should the Senate 
pass it and the President sign it, will 
mandate the government clean-up a 
certain number of these sites every 
year," says Clinger. 

Wachob contends, however, that 
dinger's negative votes on two 
major proposals of the bill — the 
creation of a victim's compensation 
fund and the ability of waste site vic- 
tims to sue in federal courts — hurt 



being debated in the House this 
summer. 

Wachob asserts his claims even 
though Clinger voted to appropriate 
10.7 billion dollars over the next five 
years to Superfund, the nation's 
hazardous waste program. 

Currently, there are four sites tar- 
geted for Superfund money in 
incumbent dinger's district. Those 
sites are located in McKean, Clinton, 
Center and Clarion counties. 

The Drake chemical site in Lock 



Nationwide forums 
scheduled for this fall 



Responding to continued strong 
interest in the Master of Business 
Administration (MBA) degree, the 
Graduate Management Admission 
Council (GMAC) will sponsor a 
series of five MBA forums this fall. 

Admissions personnel from more 
than 75 national and international 
graduate management schools will 
answer questions and discuss their 
MBA programs at the following 
locations: 

♦Washington, DC - Sept. 28-29. 

♦Los Angeles, CA - Oct. 12-13 

♦Chicago, II. - Oct. 26-27. 

♦Boston, Ma. -Nov. 9-10. 

♦New York, NY - Nov. 16-17. 



In addition to learning about the 
availability of MBA programs from 
representatives of graduate man- 
agement schools and management 
experts, candidates can also attend 
workshops on "MBA Careers," 
"Doctoral Programs," and "The 
MBA and You." 

The admission fee is $5.00 per day, 
which covers all scheduled events. 
There is no advance registration. 
For further information call toll-free 
(800) 922-1086, in New Jersey (609) 
734-1539, or write Sandra Wagner, 
National Coordinator of Forums, CN 
6106, Princeton, NJ 08541-6106. 



GRAND OPENING 

OCT. 4-10 

GARDNER'S 
CANDIES 

in the Clarion Mall 

SPECIAL^ Purchase 1 lb. of our famous 

peanut butter meltaways at $3.98 
a lb. and receive Vz lb. of water 
blanched peanuts - FREE 

Largest assortment of 

fine chocolate, cooked nuts and 

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12- 5 p.m. Sun. 

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the rights of citizens victimized by 
polluters. 

Neither of those proposals made it 
into the final draft of the legislation. 

Argues Harry Phillips, Clmger's 
media liason, those proposals that 
Wachob wanted instituted and 
Clinger voted against would've 
made a larger program even larger. 

In regard to dinger's vote against 
the victim's compensation fund, 
Phillips says that the proposal 
should have been transformed into a 
separate bill. 

Wachob says that the toxic waste 
problem isn't just a clean-up prob- 
lem and that the government should 
help citizens as well as the environ- 
ment. 

In regard to dinger's vote against 
the chance of waste site victims to 
sue in federal court, Phillips says 
that the deluge of resultant lawsuits 
would've caused clean-up operations 
to halt. 

Wachob says that in many states 
victims have no recourse, through 
state law, to seek damages for their 
injuries. 

"Now we have a Superfund pro- 
gram which will support a vastly in- 
creased clean-up program," says 



Meeting set 

Returning Adult/ Commuter 
Students will hold an open house 
in the Commuter Lounge of Har- 
vey Hall on Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 
10a.m.-4p.m. 

At noon and 1 p.m. bring a 
lM"own bag lunch and hear several 
speakers address specified con- 
cerns and needs. Coffee and rolls 
will be provided. Everyone is 
welcome. 



Sweet Thursday 
concerts continue 

The Coffeehouse/Lecture com- 
mittee of Center Board will present 
a free Sweet Thursday Concert fea- 
turing G H Flyer on Sept. 27 at 8:15 
p.m. in the Clarion University 
Oiapel Theater. 

This Pittsburgh based band plays 
pop-oriented rock, including such 
artists as Dan Fogelberg, Billy 
Idol, Prince, Bruce Springsteen, and 
The Cars. In addition to this, G H 
Flyer will perform their original 
songs which have already proved to 
be successful in the band's Pitts- 
burgh tour. 

G H Flyer features the talented 
Gary Hohman, who has had the 
honor of appearing with Bob Seger, 
Keith Emerson, Steppenwolf, 
Triumph, Rory Gallagher, Johnny 
Winter, and David Kemer. 

Make your Thursdays sweet: 
come see G H Flyer. 



Wachob, "but we do not have a bill 
that adequately protects victims." 

Originally, former President Jim- 
my Carter proposed a $1.6 billion 
Superfund bill in 1979 during the 
wake of Love Canal. 

The legislation was meant to fund 
the clean-up of waste-sites that no 
one was willing to take responsibil- 
ity for. 

Under the present administration, 
marked by the controversial 
reign/resignation of Environmental 



Protection Agency Chief Anne Bur- 
ford, the EPA has cleaned up only 
six of the 546 priority Superfund 
sites. 

EPA has identified over 17,000 
possible Superfund sites. More are 
turning up at the rate of 1,000 new 
sites every six months. 

EPA expects that as many as 2,200 
of the sites require urgent clean-up 
that will cost between 8.4 and $16 
billion. 



Madonna sees teacher 
crisis as inevitable 



By Dr. G. Terry Madonna 
President, Association of 
Pennsylvania State College 
and University Faculties (apscuf) 

American education has recently 
undergone a scrutiny unparalleled 
in modem times. Virtually no other 
public institution has been studied as 
intensively, mth the possible excep- 
tion of Richard Nixon's White House 
operation. The reports and studies 
generated by this interest would now 
fill a small library. Oddly enough the 
nation's teachers generally have not 
been asked what changes they 
believe are essential to improve the 
quality of the education they 
provide. Many critics of American 
education view the teacher as a 
stumbling block to the implemen- 
tation of many of the reforms 
proposed by the national 
commissions, "niey are wrong. 

Just recently, the Metropolitan 
Life Insurance Company commis- 
sioned pollster Louis Harris to 
survey the attitudes of teachers in 
order to ascertain what they think 
should be done to improve educa- 
tional quality. The survey quizzed 
2,000 teachers and may well be the 
first survey of its kind, an obvious 
omission in the reform process. 

Contrary to the critics' belief, 
teachers favor many of the reforms 
proposed in the national reports. 
More than 95 percent of those polled 
want a greater emphasis on reading, 
writing, and mathematics. About 90 
percent believe that the study of 
computer science and foreign langu- 
ages should be expanded. Clearly, if 
teachers had their way, the curricu- 
lum of our students would 
emphasize those disciplines that are 
essential building blocks for other 
types of learning, while also re- 
sponding to the nation's 
contemporary needs. 

Considering their educational at- 
tainment, more than half believe 
they are underpaid and not well re- 
spected, providing more evidence 
that widespread teacher dissatisfac- 



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Sat 9-5 

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226-6100 



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tion is leading the nation toward a 
genuine crisis for the profession. 
The facts are clear. The best of our 
college students shun teaching. The 
best of the current crop of teachers 
are the most dissatisfied with their 
jobs. The best teachers leave the 
profession in much greater numbers 
than poorer teachers. 

The Metropolitan Life survey also 
indicates that a majority of our 
teachers would not advise their stu- 
dents to become teachers. Almost 
everyone remembers the guidance 
and inspiration of a "special" teach- 
er. We all remember how our career 
choices were shaped and influenced 
by an excellent instructor. When 
these same inspirational teachers 
start discouraging our young men 
and women from entering the pro- 
fession, the nation is left with an edu- 
cational crisis of the first 
magnitude. 

No mere tinkering at the margins 
will reverse the teacher crisis. 
Tliere will soon be a shortage of 
qualified teachers in almost every 
subject field. For example, the 
National Science Teachers Associa- 
tion estimates that by 1995 we will 
need 300,000 new mathematics and 
science teachers. The National 
Center for Educational Statistics, 
citing demographic data, warns that 
the nation will need a 25 percent 
increase in elementary teachers by 
1988, only three short years away. 
Unless the nation and its leaders get 
serious about making the teaching 
profession a financially rewarding 
and professionally attractive occu- 
pation, all the current reforms 
seeking excellence will not provide a 
solution to the crisis in education. 

The following want ad for a high 
school teaching position, described 
in a recent Rand publication, 
denotes the dimension of the pro- 
gram. 

WANTED 

College graduate with academic 
major (master's degree preferred). 
Excellent communication and lead- 
ership skills required. Qiallenging 
opportunity to serve 150 clients daily, 
developing up to five different 
products each day to meet their 
needs. This diversified job also 
allows employee to exercise typing, 
clerical, law enforcement, and 
social work skills between assign- 
ments and after hours. 
Adaptability helpful, since suppliers 
cannot always deliver goods and 
support services on time. Typical 
work week 47 hours. Special nature 
of work precludes fringe benefits 
such as lunch and coffee breaks, but 
work has many intrinsic rewards. 
Parting salary $12,769, with a guar- 
antee of $24,000 after only 14 years. 

As a recent college graduate, 
would you be interested in this job? 



f 



4 



i 



MacBeth participates in 
month-long seminar 



By Jenifer Wilson 



Mr. Bruce MacBeth, of the 
English Dept., recently participated 
in a month-long course concerning 
the area of technical writing. The 
course, which was sponsored by the 
Federal Program for Improvement 
of Post-Secondary Education 
(FPIPSE), was held at Seton Hall 
University, South Orange, N.J. Mr. 
MacBeth was ono of 22 participants 
selected from several hundred appli- 
cants. 

According to MacBeth, to be edu- 
cated in technical writing, one must 
learn to ". . .emphasize industrial 
communication demands where the 



communicator will write introduc- 
tions, explanation processes, 
describe a mechanism, define, 
analyze, and summarize." Techni- 
cal writers also prepare business let- 
ters, reports, conduct research, and 
communicates orally. "In fact," 
said MacBeth, "one doesn't need to 
be a technician or scientist to be a 
tech-writer." 

MacBeth found the course very in- 
teresting and helpful. He was es- 
pecially interested in the use of 
graphics in technical writing like 
scales, graphs, diagrams, etc. 
Another item of special interest to 
him was a tour of Bell Laboratories. 
Bell was among the 16 groups of pre- 
senters throughout the course. 



Point Park offers 
non-credit classes 

Point Park College's Community 
Class Division announces its Fall 
1984 Term, which will offer students 
an array of non-credit classes in act- 
ing, dance and music for children, 
teenagers and adults. 

The Community Class Division 
will hold more than 60 group classes 
this fall including ballet, pointe, 
jazz, tap, modern, acting, Suxuki 
violin (for children ages four to 
eight), piano (for youngsters ages 
eight to 12) and beginning singing 
(for adults). These classes have 
been designed for elementary 
through advanced level students. 

For a free brochure abut the 
Community Class Division's pro- 
gram, contact Casey Gnage or 
David Vinski at 392-3456. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984—7 

1-80 may become 
intrastate toll road 



By Ken Ream 



A special House-Senate Commit- 
tee in Harrisburg is considering this 
week whether to recommend to the 
general assembly a proposal to 
make Interstate 80 a toll road from 
Ohio to New York. The proposal by 
the Governor's Task Force on toll 
roads is designed to shift some of the 
cost of maintaining 1-80 from the 
state to the large proportion of out- 
of-state traffic that uses the 
highway. 

Much concern has been expressed 
locally about the effect a toll road 
would have on business at the 



Communication major welcomed by trustees 



J 



The Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania Council of Trustees welcomed 
its newest member, Susan Mueller, 
a sophomore communication major 
from Rochester, N.Y., at its Thurs- 
day night meeting in Stevens Hall. 

Mueller, confirmed by the State 
Senate on Wednesday, will serve as 
long as she is a full-time undergrad- 
uate student. She is scheduled to 
graduate in May of 1987. 

Trustees present for the meeting 
—Dr. Syed Ali-Zaidi, Paul Weaver, 
Ed Lawton, Don Stroup, Oleta Ams- 
ler, Richard Snebold, Marc Katzen 
and Fred Mcllhattan — reviewed a 
number of information items con- 
cerning the operation of the univer- 
sity. 

Two new Digital Equipment Cor- 
poration VAC 780 computers are now 
fully installed, replacing the Univac 
9070 which was previously used by 
the university as a main frame 
computer. The applications former- 
ly run on the Univac are being con- 

Homecoming.... 

(Continued from Page 2) 

The University Marching Band, 
along with Oil City and many other 
out-of-town marching bands, will 
also take part in the parade. 

As always, the homecoming foot- 
ball game, with student and alumni 
support, will draw a large crowd. 
This year's game is against lUP and 
a large contingent of their fans is 
expected. The game starts at 2:30 in 
the stadium. 

Halftime at the football game will 
be enlivened by the crowning of the 
1984 Homecoming Queen. The 1983 
Homecoming Queen, Cindy Jubeck, 
will return to crown the new queen. 

Over 100 applications have been 
sent out for this year's crown, so the 
competition should be tough. Appli- 
cations for homecoming queen are 
due on Sept. 28, at 4:30 in room 108 
Reimer Center. 

There are other special events 
planned for homecoming. CAB at 
the Eagle's Den will sponsor a blue 
and gold night, wear blue and gold to 
the dance and get pizza for 25 cents a 
slice, from 9-12:30. 

Another special event planned is a 
Russian comedian. Yakov Smirnoff 
will come to Clarion University to 
entertain all who are interested and 
will perform in Marwick-Boyd Audi- 
torium. He will be there from 8:15- 
9:30. 

When asked how this year's home- 
coming festivities would compare to 
last year's, Carolyn Starcher, Spe- 
cial Events Chairperson, said it 
would "Probably be larger, it seems 
to be getting larger every year." 



verted to the DEC units, and the 
most essential programs are al- 
ready completely tested and in use. 

In another item related to use of 
computers, linkage has been estab- 
lished with Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity for Clarion students to have 
the opportunity to use Penn State's 
IBM computer. The telephone link 
will allow students at Clarion to gain 
experience with some of the IBM 
computer software. 

Clarion offers many computer ex- 
periences for students. Clarion stu- 
dents have the opportunity to use 
DEC equipment in the local com- 
puter center, IBM equipment at 
Penn State, Zilog super micro com- 
puters in the Becker lab, Apple and 
Franklin micro computers in Beck- 
er, Peirce, Carlson and IBM micro 
computers in the Still Hall lab. 

In other matters: 

*Four tenure track appointments 



were made under academic and stu- 
dent affairs. The following individ- 
uals were hired in academic affairs : 
Ann Aydelotte, an assistant profes- 
sor of nursing; John Lovelace, an 
instructor in the Educational Oppor- 
tunities Program, and John Zetts, an 
associate professor of physics. 
Judith Hinga, an assistant professor 
in the Counseling Center, was hired 
in the academic affairs area. A 
number of non-tenure position ap- 
pointments were also announced. 

*As of Sept. 6, occupancy in Com- 
monwealth-owned and university 
leased halls was 99.5 percent. The 
regular capacity of the facilities is 
2,593. 

*The Public Affairs area, which 
includes the public relations, sports 
information, and alumni affairs de- 
partments, generated an estimated 
$261,060 in print publicity during the 
1983-84 fiscal yearl. The figure was 



This Saturday, Oct. 4 



CAB'S 



Presents 



Another Exciting Dance 

featuring 

Candlelig/it Dancing 

and non-alcohol mixed drinl<s 

Sponsored by the 



CAB'S continues 

to provide the 

excitement on 

campus. 

Get there early 

to beat the 

crowd! 

Dance from: 

9 p.m. til 12:30 a.m 



M 

AMER\CAN 
>VI>4RKETING 

/ISBOCI/ITION 




based on a comparison of the cost for 
column inches in newspapers. In 
addition to print publicity, 
addition to print publicity, addition- 
al publicity was generated through 
television and radio publicity and 
special publications. 



various exits, but according to State 
Representative David R. Wright, 
free access to these businesses 
would continue. "I have been 
assured that these exits will be kept 
open and that they will not be used 
for toll collection booths," explains 
Wright. Instead, collection points 
would be placed along the highway 
at non-exit locations. "For 
example," states Wright, "there 
could be a toll booth between Exits 
12 and 13, not at the exits." 

If the state would decide to pursue 
the proposal, approval from the fed- 
eral government would be needed. 
For though the highway is state- 
maintained, it was built with 
substantial federal funds and cannot 
be converted to a toll road without 
federal permission. 

The proposal also calls for a simi- 
lar conversion of Interstate-70 be- 
tween New Stanton and the West 
Virginia border. 



JOB SEMINAR 

What do employers look for in a 
candidate? What factors turn off 
interviewers? A panel of recruit- 



ers will answer your questions 
about the job interview. 



4lut 

7U^ VdCmfi^ 




PIZZA HUT 

ROUTE 2 
SHIPPENVILLE, PA. 

226-8763 




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8-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 



Hartley's team ranks third 



By Margie Zerbe 



Dr. Hartley has been a member of 
the Clarion faculty for six years. He 
received his bachelors degree from 
the University of Wisconsin and his 
masters from Ball State College in 
Muncey, Indiana. Besides teaching 
in the Speech department, Dr. Hart- 
ley coaches a competitive speech 
team. This team consists of approxi- 
mately 10 to 15 students. A speech 
team can be compared to an athletic 
team in several respects. One, the 
students sign up, with some mem- 
bers eventually quitting throughout 
the course of the year. Many Com- 
munications, Speech and Drama 
majors are involved in this activity, 
but Hartley points out, many 
students from unrelated majors also 
become interested. 

The students travel to competi- 
tions every weekend, against any- 
where from 15 to 40 other schools at 
a time. 

Speech team members put in 
many hard hours of work. Each 
member must prepare a speech, 
which is revised again and again 
throughout the course of the year. 
Some types of speeches are improm- 
ptu, persuasion and extempor- 
aneous. The speakers must also, 
meet with Dr. Hartley on a regular 
basis to discuss new ideas for their 
speeches and solve any other related 
problems. This may seem like a lot 
of hard work, but the rewards are 
tremendous; for Clarion's team is 
ranked third in the nation. Last 
year, the team traveled to Ohio, New 
York and all over Pennsylvania. 
TTiey also competed in a National 



Tournament in Georgia, placing 12th 
out of 140 schools. 

Dr. Hartley says: "being a 
member of the speech team gives 



the student a good feeling of achiev- 
ing perfection." And why not. . .with 
a ranking of third in the entire 
nation, who wouldn't feel good? ! 



Clarion's Forensics team 
is back and strong as ever 



By Wendy Wilson 



Forensics at Clarion is back again 
this year as strong as ever. The first 
tournament, which is a novice tour- 
nament, is scheduled for Oct. 5 at 2 
p.m. at Shippensburg. The first tour- 
nament to be held on campus will be 
Oct. 19-20 at Dana Still. 

Forensics is unique because it is 
the only academic sport and the 
team has done consistently well. 
Clarion has been nationally ranked 
in the top five for the last 10 years. 
They have competed against UCLA, 
Ohio State, Penn State and many 
other schools. Last year the team 
placed 13th at the national competi- 



tion in Statesboro, GA. There, they 
competed against 140 other schools. 

This year, the team has about 20 
members and will be competing in 
six tournaments. Tournaments held 
here will be at Still Hall. Everyone is 
welcome to come and watch. 

The Tournament Schedule for this 
semester is: 

Oct. 19-20 at Clarion; 

Oct. 26-28: Penn State; 

Nov. 8-10: Bloomsburg; 

Nov. 15-17: Shippensburg; 

Anyone interested may contact 
Ron Hartley, Forensics Coach, lo- 
cated in Speech Communication and 
Theatre Department. 






640 AM 



90 CABLE FM 



WCCB, Clarion's Hot Rock Station 

is located at 102 Harvey Hall. WCCB's 
executive board invites anyone Interested 
In "on" or "off-air" positions to come 
and visit us. Working with WCCB gives 
you a great opportunity to become In- 
volved In public relations, programming, 
. newswrlting, sales and other facets of 
the radio business. 



(Left to Right) 

Marc Sherman 

Program Director 

Ron Hickoff 

General Manager 

TinaShash 

Public Relations Director 
Dave Parker 

Sales Manager 

Dave Sneath 
Engineer 

Jim Sedlak 

News Director 

MIkeAlfie 

Sports Director 

Calib James 

Music Director 
(Not Shown) 



Come and See What WCCB Is all about! 




Dr. Ron Hartley, coach of th« nationally ranked Forensics team. 

photo by Chuck LIzza 

Student Activities 
list services 

BUTTONS/PROMOTIONAL BADGES - can be made for individuals or or- 
ganizations (30 cents each). We need the exact design and wording, but 
check with us for the size requirements. 

CHECK CASHING - is available in Reimer Center Ticket Office 
(Upstairs) on Monday thru Friday from 12 Noon to 2 p.m. with valid ID. $25 
limit on personal checks - no limit on University payroll checks. There is a 
fee schedule for this service. 

COPY MACHINE - is now available in Reimer Center Upstairs during 
open hours. The coin-operated machine (10 cents a copy) has the ability to 
reduce large items (computer printouts, etc. ) to an SVzxll copy. 
DITTO COPIES (Spirit Masters) - from a typed original (1 cent a copy) that 
you need reproduced. We can also run off a master produced on our machine 
(10 cents each) and provide copies you need. 

FILM CATALOGS - from a number of companies that rent films are 
here. Often a check of various catalogs will not only provide a greater 
variety, but identify a price range for a particular film you may be consider- 
ing. 

FUND RAISING - all fund-raising projects to be held on campus must be 
approved BEFOREHAND — preferably two to three weeks in advance. We 
have on file several projects (candy sales, stadium seats, novelty buttons, 
etc. ) that may be of help to you. 

LEADERSHIP MANUALS - can be obtained at no charge for officers 
concerned about their organizations running effectively. Some of the areas 
covered are: Goal Setting; H ow to Conduct Meetings ; Role Of The Advisor 
and Fundamentals Of Group Interaction. 

LECTURERS - A file is available of persons to speak on most issues. If 
your organization is considering this type of program, you may want to stop 
by and review this data. Also, we often are aware of other organizations such 
as Center Board who are also planning for lecturers - this information may 
be useful to you. 

MINI-BASKETBALL (Pop-A-Shot) - portable game can be rented out 
for recreational or fund-raising activities. You can see it in operation in the 
Reimer Games Area. Daily or weekend rates available plus a damage 
deposit. 



You can buy a diamond 

almost anywhere - 

but if you care to l<now 

what you're buying 

see the trained personnel at 




iPauLcrf. vv&atJEt 

606 Main St. 
226-8272 



^ 



(AJEL&nS 



In troducing 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984—9 



By Susan Boll 



Missy Rilling is a junior business 
management major from Girard, 
Pa., who also happens to be the cur- 
rent Miss Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania. In addition to this, 
she is an active member of Sigma 
Sigma Sigma and Panhel, which is 
the governing tx>dy of all sororities. 
In fact, it was her sorority sisters 
who persuaded her to run for Miss 
CUP. 

The Miss CUP pageant consists of 
a talent, swimsuit, and evening 
gown competition plus a personal in- 
terview which is conducted by offi- 
cial pageant state judges. For her 
talent segment, Missy sang, "The 
Way He Makes Me Feel," from the 
movie, "Yentl." After being crown- 



ed Miss CUP she was awarded $950. 
Four hundred of that sum went to 
scholarship, $400 more for clothes 
and the remaining $150 was in gift 
certificates from area merchants. 

Certain duties are expected of any 
pageant winner and Miss CUP cer- 
tainly has her share of them. Her re- 
sponsibilities include: riding in the 
homecoming parade, performing in 
the Miss Teen competition during 
homecoming, which is sponsored by 
the Clarion Area Chamber of Com- 
merce, and coordinating the Miss 
CUP Pageant for 1985. 

This summer. Missy was one of 28 
contestants in the Miss Pennsyl- 
vania competition which was held in 
Altoona at the Jaffa Mosque. Ac- 
cording, to her, "During that time, 
we could not receive any phone calls 



Copeland goes "over 100" 



Dr. Robert Copeland, chairperson 
of the Speech Communication and 
Theatre Department, has directed 
127 plays during his 25 years at 
Clarion University. His grand finale 
will be "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" on 
Oct. 2-4 in Marwick-Boyd Auditor- 
ium. 

An "Over 100" performance party 
will be held on Oct. 6 and will also 
mark the debut of the Copeland 
Theatre Association. 

Better known as "Doc", "Uncle 
Bobby", or "Copey", by his close 
associates, Copeland is a soft spoken 
man rarely known to show a temper. 
Dr. Charles Marlin, a colleague, 
describes him as "a person who 
doesn't like to talk much about him- 
self." He is a humble man and 
describes himself as simply "calm". 

A native of Kansas, Copeland, 56, 
received a B.A. in Speech at Wichi- 
ta, Kansas. He pursued a M.A. and 
Ph.D. in Theatre at the University of 
Denver, (Colorado. He is married 
and has a daughter who is currently 
attending Clarion University. 

Theatre is his life. It is his passion 
and what he knows best. On sabbati- 
cal in 1983, he spent time in Holly- 
wood, California studying television, 
film, and perfecting his trade — act- 
ing. He auditioned for several tele- 
vision and film roles. His most 
memorable was the lead role in 
"Angles Flight" a romance comedy 
play about a serviceman who 
returns to Angles Flight (Los 
Angeles) to claim his first love. 

"Theatre", he says, "is bringing a 
play alive from the printed page 
through movement and environ- 
ment". In his judgement, a good 
play depicts the author's work as it 
was intended. 

Asked about his favorite produc- 
tion at Clarion, his face brightens, 
"Jesus Christ Superstar". With a 
sudden burst of energy, he explains, 
"It had good voices, choreography, 
costumes, and scenery". The most 
frustrating moments of directing he 
describes are those where "You 
decide on a play, go to rehearsal, 
realize it's miscast, and know it will 
not succeed." 

Speaking about his latest produc- 
tion, he says, "Cat on a Hot Tin 
Roof is about life, love, marriage, 
sex, death, and conflicts." He chose 
the play as his final project in 
theatre at Clarion because he plays 
"Big Daddy", his favorite role. Cope- 
land also purpc^ely selected a cast 
ol Qarion University theatre alunmi, 
community, and currrait students. 



Reminiscing his 25 years at Clar- 
ion University, Copeland credits his 
long service to its administrations, 
which he asserts have always given 
his department the freedom to 
develop. Among his many accom- 
plishments, he established the Bach- 
elor of Fine Arts program in 1978. It 
was the first professional arts 
degree at Clarion. "Clarion", he 
proudly states, "has one of the best 
SCT programs in Pennsylvania. We 
produce a high caliber of SCT 
majors." 

Copeland's legacy at Clarion is the 
Copeland Fund governed by the 
Copeland Theatre Association. Its 
main purpose is to facilitate a fund 
that will aid selected BFA first se- 
mester juniors in their professional 
advancement. The money may be 
used to travel to auditions, work- 
shops, compile portfolio, or anything 
the student views essential toward 
his or her career goals. 

Solicitation for pledges has been 
underway and will continue in the 
future. Anyone wishing to donate for 
the cause should make checks pay- 
able to the Clarion University Foun- 
dation with a special note, "For the 
Copeland Fund". The contribution is 
tax deductible. In connection with 
the "Over 100" celebration, only 
those donating to the fund will be 
eligible for tickets to the Oct. 6 per- 
formance, reception, and dinner. 

Copeland plans to pursue movies, 
television, and some legitimate 
theatre in Hollywood, California. He 
has an agent and his future certainly 
looks bright. In a playwright's 
words, "the curtain falls on Clarion 
and the stage lights up in Holly- 
wood." 



or visitors because they could have 
affected our performance." 

The Miss CUP Pageant, as Missy 
pointed out, was very expensive. She 
personally spent $3,000 plus the $400 
that the university gave her in eve- 
ning gowns, a competition gown, a 
swimsuit, and shoes which had to be 
dyed to match every outfit. Other 
costly items included dinners, lunch- 
eons, suits for the personal interview 
as well as the group interview and 
orchestration for her song in the 
talent competition. 

Although she did not win. Missy 
felt her experience was worthwhile. 
"I learned a lot about myself as well 
as about the other girls." 

The winner of the Miss Pennsyl- 
vania competition was Gina Major, 
a 25-year-old graduate of Drexel 
University. 

The fate of the Miss CUP Pageant 
is a present concern since Joyce 
Marburger the former pageant di- 
rector left. Dave Tomeo from Center 
Board is the current pageant direc- 
tor. The Miss CUP committee is 
looking for a faculty member or a 
faculty member's wife to take over 
the position which Dave Tomeo now 
holds. If a director is not found, then 
the pageant will be held on the local 
level and not the state or else it will 
be discontinued. 

Hopefully, the Miss CUP Pageant 
will live long enough to become a 
tradition of Clarion University. 




Melissa Rilling, Clarion's Miss C.U.P. 

photo by Chris Zawrotuk 



Two productions upcoming for SCT 



By Peg Cudzil 



This fall the Speech Communica- 
tion and Theatre department will be 
performing two shows. The first is 
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" by Tennes- 
see WiUiams. The second is "Angel 
Street" by Patrick Hamilton. Both 
plays will be performed in the Mar- 
wick-Boyd Little Theatre. Admis- 
sion is free to college students with 
an ID and $4 to the public. 

"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" will be 
staged on Oct. 2-4, with a special per- 
formance on Oct. 6 for alumni only. 
Dr. Bob Copeland will direct this 
drama. This will be celebrated as his 
100th production as a director. He 
will be retiring this year after 26 
years. "Cat" will be the first project 
undertaken for the new Tech Direc- 
tor, Gary Chopcian from Canada. 

Out of a cast of 13, the three main 
characters are as follows: Margaret, 
played by Irma Levy; Brick, por- 
trayed by Irma Levy; Brick, por- 
trayed by George Jabber, a 1977 



graduate of Clarion University, and 
Big Daddy, performed by Dr. Bob 
C!opeland. 

"Cat" is a story about a plantation 
family. The father is dying of cancer 
and the two sons dispute over who 
will be heir to the fortune. 

The second production "Angel 
Street" is scheduled for Nov. 13-17. 
Dr. Mary Hardwick will direct this 



melodrama. This play, originally 
called "Gaslight", depicts a man 
who has hidden rubies in the attic of 
his house, but is now unable to find 
them. He tears the attic apart. At the 
same time he is trying to drive his 
wife insane so he will have the 
wealth from the rubies all to him- 
self. The cast of five has not yet been 
selected. 



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10— THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 

"Stun guns" banned 



After a number of incidents and 
reports that about 20 students were 
walking around campus carrying 
"stun guns," Grossmont Commun- 
ity College officially has prohibited 
its 15,000 students from carrying the 
guns. 

"The trustees decided to ban stun 
guns when they became aware of 
a poetntial problem," says Bev 
Powell, a trustees spokeswoman. 
"Students were playing with them. 
We had no serious incidents, but de- 
cided we would rather not have them 
on campus." 

The guns emit up to a 50,000 volt 
electrical charge, and can render a 
victim helpless for up to 15 minutes. 

They sell for $70-$90. 

No one is sure why students at 
Grossmont, whose two campuses 
are in the San Diego metropolitan 
area, began carrying the guns. 

Powell says some of the students 
said it was for protection. 

"In our large city, there are lots of 
rapes and muggings," she concedes. 
"But I don't think there are many at 
Grossmont. We have a campus 
police force, and the campus is well 
Ughted." 

Grossmont seems to be the first 
campus to report a stun gun prob- 
lem. 

"We've not heard of any similar 
problems at other campuses," says 
Ann Luby of the International As- 
sociation of Campus Law Enforce- 
ment Administrators in Hartford, 

a. 



"The weapon is relatively new," 
adds John Davis, Grossmont's se- 
curity chief. "Frankly, most 
security departments I've talked 
with aren't familiar with them." 

Davis notes the guns aren't illegal, 
but stresses students shouldn't be 
allowed to carry them. 

"It's a good weapon," he admits, 
"but it can be used offensively as 
well as defensively." 

Besides worrying that an attacker 
can wrest the stun gun away and use 
it against the student, Davis frets 
the guns could fall into the wrong 
student hands. "We had one incident 
of a student we knew was not as 
stable as we would like carrying 
one." 

Now, students caught carrying a 
stun gun will be advised of the col- 
lege policy. A second incident will 
lead to a disciplinary hearing. 

Stun gun distributor LeRoy Cuker 
says he's sold about 2000 stun guns 
since introducing them to the area 
last January. "Some police and 
security departments are carrying t 
them," he says. "It's the perfect tool 
to completely defend ourselves, and 
no one gets hurt." 

Cuker isn't happy about the 
Grossmont banning, but allows that 
"the (media) coverage has been 
good advertising for me." 

In recent years, Marquette, Ten- 
nessee and all public colleges in 
Washington state have banned guns 
from their campuses. 




The Fixx'8 lead singer, Cy Gamin and keyboards, Rupert Qreenall. 

photo by Chuck LIzza 



"The Fixx" Delivers 



By Stan Eakin 



The internationally acclaimed 
rock band, "The Fixx", shook 
Clarion's Memorial Stadium last 
Saturday night before an enthusias- 
tic, jam-packed grandstand. Near 
perfect weather and a large turnout 
set the stage for a great night of live 
music. 

At precisely 7 p.m., "The Andy 




THAN 



^ Can you picture yourself 
swinging down a clifr? Or 
shooting the rapids? Or 
crossing a river using only 
a rope and your own two 
Viands? 

You'll have a chance 
to do all this and more in 
Army ROTC. 

Adventure training like 
this helps you develop 
many or the qualities you'll 
need as an Army officer. 

Qualities like self- 
confidence. Stamina. And 
the ability to perform 
under pressure. 

If you'd like to find out 
more, make a date to see 
your Army ROTC Professor 
of Military Science. 

ARMY ROTC. 
BEALLVOUCANBE. 

CALL MAJOR SMITH AT: 
226-2292/2293 



Fraser Band," of London, started 
things off strutting their smooth, 
rock-funk style. By mixing pleasant 
melodies with shimmering guitar 
riffs and a booming bass, the Fraser 
group grabbed the audience's eyes 
and ears and never let go. Andy 
Fraser, made popular by the hit 
single, "Fine, Fine, Line", tuned up 
the atmosphere and proved them- 
selves a top-notch lead-off band on 
the rise. 

A short period of intermission was 
ended by the sound of electrifying 
drums which shattered the cahn air- 
ways and introduced the feature at- 
traction, "The Fixx". 

Promoting their third album, 
"Phantoms", the Fixx's recently in- 
iated tour came to Clarion with the 
obvious intention of making an im- 
pression. They accomplished this 
task very successfully. The band 
kicked-off playing tunes from their 
latest studio effort and took no time 
in showing off their new, techno- 
electronic stage. The exhilarating 
light show and often strange antics 



of lead singer Cy Cumin provided a 
clever, visual show to go along with 
their catchy audio productions. Hit 
songs like "Are We Ourselves?", 
"Saved By Zero", and "Red Skies" 
split the show into segments which 
kept even totally new Fixx admirers 
attentive. Many versions of their 
songs were done in concert-extended 
style, primarily using the multiple 
layered and tantilizing keyboards of 
the inventive Rupert Greenall. 

The diligent and spirited congre- 
gation of on-lookers remained active 
throughout the night, swaying, clap- 
ping, and often joining in on the ly- 
rics. When seemingly finished, the 
rowdy crowd initiated a two-song 
encore highlighting a number one 
hit, "One Thing Leads to Another". 
All in all, the show was done well, 
with the absence of any prolonged, 
mediocre moments. 

Andy Fraser and "The Fixx" 
delivered solid performances dis- 
playing a pure and acoustically sat- 
isfying sound difficult to produce for 
an outdoor show. 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, SEPT. 27 

DINNER: Homemade Split Pea Soup w/Ham Chunks, Scotch Barley Soup, Braised Swiss 
steak in Vegetable Gravy, Baked Barbeque Pork Chops, Broccoli, Baked Potato, Sauteed 
Cabbage w/Bacon. 
FRIDAY, SEPT. 28 

BREAKFAST: Stewed Prunes, Fried Eggs - Sunnyside or Over, Cinnamon Roll, Fried Po- 
tatoes, Fresh Banana, Creamed Chipped Beef on English Muffin, English Muffin. 
LUNCH: Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Bisque, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Creamed Chicken 
over Biscuit, Potato Chips. 

DINNER; Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Bisque, Fried Shrimp, Tacos, Com, Shoestring 
Potatoes, Beets. 
SATURDAY, SEPT. 29 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Fried Potatoes, Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Scrapple, 
Raspberry Coffee Ring. 

LUNCH: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Cheese Omelette, Pizza, Po- 
ffltops Bcflns 

DINNER: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Roast Pork, Beefaroni, 
Creamed Spinach, Pork Gravy, Carrots, Potatoes. 
SUNDAY, SEPT. 30 

BRUNCH: Half Pink Grapefruit, Scrambled Eggs, Diced Peaches, Chicken Chow Mein over 
Steamed Rice w/Chow Mein Noodles Hash Brown Potatoes, Bagels w/Cream Cheese, Warm 
Sticky Buns, Fresh Banana, Blueberry Hot Cakes w/Syrup, Sausage Patty. 
DINNER: French Onion Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Baked Smoked Ham, Braised Sirloin Tips, 
Peas, Noodles, Squash. 
MONDAY, OCT. 1 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cinnamon Rolls, Fried Potatoes, Raisin Muffins, 
French Toast w/Hot Syrup, Grilled Spam, Cream of Wheat. 

LUNCH: Homemade Beef w/Macaroni Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Hoagie, Fried Egg Sand- 
wich, Com Chips, Boston Baked Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef w/Macaroni Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Pot Roast of Beef 
w/Brown Gravy, Turkey Croquette w/Cream Mushroom Sauce, Oven Browned Potatoes, 
Brussel Sprouts, Mixed Vegetables. 
TUESDAY, OCT. 2: 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Cheese and Ham Omelette, Fried Potatoes, Chilled Purple 
Plums, Blueberry Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, Jelly Roll, Glazed Donuts. 
LUNCH: Homemade Cream of Chicken Soup, Split Pea Soup, Grilled Hamburger on Roll 
w/Sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce, Boiled Ham, Green Beans and Potato Casserole, 
Potato Chips, Onion Rings. 

DINNER : Homemade Cream of Chicken Soup, Split Pea Soup, Swedish Meat Balls, Fish and 
Chips, Stewed Tomatoes, Rice, Asparagus. 
WEDNESDAY OCT 3 

BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Bacon, Cinnamon Rolls, Fried PoUtoes, Hot Waffles w/Syrup, 
Cream of Wheat, EInglish Muffins. 

LUNCH: Cream of Tomato Soup. Chicken Broth, Grilled Ham & Cheese Sandwich, Chicken 
ala King in Patty Shell, Com Curls, Baked Apples. 

DINNER: Cream of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Grilled Pork Chops, Cheese Ravioli, Green 
Beans, Tater Gem Potatoes, Beets. 



Schools ban 
overnight guests 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984-11 



University of Florida students 
soon may find their indoor nocturnal 
activities curtailed by a ban on 
members of the opposite sex spend- 
ing the night with them in residence 
halls and fraternity houses. 

And if Florida and other colleges 
are any indication, students every- 
where may soon be facing tough new 
restrictions on what they can do in 
campus housing. 

Florida decided to think seriously 
about joining the growing number of 
colleges that restrict visiting hours 
when a university task force sug- 
gested the changes in July. 

Student reaction was mixed. 

The 13-member task force, made 
up of faculty, students and com- 
munity representatives, was re- 
acting to an alleged rape at a frater- 
nity house and a campus hearing 
into a student's complaint about 
being disturbed by late-night vis- 
itors, says Hugh Cunningham, di- 
rector of university information. 

"Currently, overnight visitation is 
not permitted," Cimningham notes. 
"But 24-hour visitation is, so 
obviously overnight visitation prob- 
ably exists." 

Among the suggestions were in- 
house monitoring by students and 
staff of individual residence halls, 
and live-in adult supervision in fra- 
ternity houses. 

Most fraternity members reacted 
"very well" to the recommenda- 
tions, reports Tom Dougan, campus 
fraternity advisor, though many feel 
they have been singled out because 
of the alleged rape this spring. 

"In the coming year we'll start 
staffing the fraternities with grad 
students or house mothers," Dougan 
says. "But most fraternity members 
don't feel the presence of a house 
mother would have prevented what 
allegedly occurred." 

Last week, a 16-year-old girl visit- 
ing UF claimed she was raped at a 
pre-rush party at Sigma Alpha Epsi- 
lon, which does not have a resident 
adult supervisor. 

UF police are still investigating 
the incident. 

Some fraternity members also say 
they can't afford the $15,000 a year to 
hire a house mother. 

Student reaction to the sugges- 
tions was minimal because of the 
summer release of the task force's 
report, but Cunningham expects 
more feedback as students return to 
campus this fall. 

Florida is one of a number of col- 
leges that have changed overnight 
visitor policies recently. While sign 
in/sign out sheets and curfews are 
outdated, restricted guest hours are 
replacing the more liberal policies 
promoted in the 60's and 70's on 
many campuses. 

In 1980, the University of Pitts- 
burgh revised its 24-hour visitation 
policy and now restricts overnight 
guests to the same sex. Kent State, 
Kansas and Alabama, among 
others, soon followed suit. 

The changes at Pitt and Kent State 
were promoted by dormitory 
murders. 

Administrators there and at other 
schools cite security as the reason 
for the changes. 

Students themselves are the ones 
asking for the stricter housing poli- 
cies, claims Paul Jahr, research 
committee chairman of the Ameri- 
can Association of College and Uni- 
versity Housing Officers ( ACUHO). 

"The nature of college students in 
general is changing," he explains. 



"They are making an economic 
decision to go to college and they 
want to make the best use of their 
time." 

Dorm visiting policies were a 
question "way back when," Jahr 
adds, but as society has changed in 
the past two decades, so have stu- 
dents. 

"Most students now were born 
after Kennedy was assassinated," 
he says. "They've grown up in a 
more permissive society and the 
question of visitation hours just 
isn't that big an issue to them." 

Some students, however, are 
unhappy with college administra- 
tors' attempts to regulate visiting 
hours regardless of security or 
social reasons. 

Western Illinois University stu- 
dent Pat Botterman and ex-student 
Craig Roberts are suing WIU over 
its attempts to end a 14-year open- 
door policy. 

WIU wants to ban co-ed visits af- 
ter midnight on weeknights and 
after 2 a.m. on weekends, with the 
curfew ending at 8 a.m. 

Botterman claims the change vio- 
lates the student constitution, 
approved by the university's Board 
of Governors, which specifies that 
students will be consulted in every 
level of policymaking. 

"The administration brought out 
the policy with no debate," he says. 
"The students protested. The cur- 
rent policy has been in effect since 
about 1969 and dorm residents vote 
by floor on visitationho'irs." 

Botterman and Roberts actually 
will file two suits. One, alleging vio- 
lation of the student constitution, 
may be settled by the university's 
Board of Governors in September, 
Botterman hopes. The other, pro- 
testing the proposed policy changes, 
will probably require court settle- 
ment. 

Visitation rules also have been 
challenged at Alcorn State Univer- 
sity in Lorman. Mississippi. A 
female student sued the university 
for extending her one-semester sus- 
pension to two for violating the 
policy. 

The student claims the college has 
conflicting policies for punishing 
violators. An Alcorn State spokes- 
man refused to comment on the 
lawsuit. 




.t"^ 






HB is 1 


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Ift.'^' 



Prince's Purple Rain 



photc Jy Mark Steele 



Prince's Purple Rain comes back 



By Tim Slaper 



The subject of this review is the 
soundtrack from Prince's successful 
acting debut in the movie Purple 
Rain. Prince's latest effort is a well- 
timed comeback of sorts, stealing 
some of the attention from the mega- 
publicized Jackson's Victory Tour. 

The album is presently holding the 
number one spot on the album chart 
and has two top-10 singles. They are 
the immensely popular, first releas- 
ed "When Doves Cry" and the hard 
driving "Let's Go Crazy". 

The musical talents of Prince 
(lead guitar), Wendy (guitar). 
Brown Mark (bass), Lisa Coleman 
and Matt Fink (keyboards) and 
Bobby Z. (Percussion) are brought 
forth in such upbeat tunes as "Com- 
puter Blue", and "Baby I'm A 
Star", while Prince exemplifies his 
unmistakable sexual aura in 
"Darling Nikki". 

On the opposite end of the scale lie 
the songs "I would Die 4 U", and 
"Take Me With U". These numbers 



are just a bit too top-40-ish in their 
beat, and their "devotion to your 
mate" theme is pretty well worn out. 
Purple Rain, despite its over- 
whelming success, is not a revela- 
tion, since it is just a bit less enter- 
taining without the visual portion of 
the package. I found Prince's rendi- 
tion of the title track, Purple Rain 
and the soulful "Beautiful One" 
opening tune, "Let's Go Crazy" to be 
"Beautiful Ones" as well as the 
opening tune, "Let's Go Crazy" to be 
much more enjoyable when I saw 
the movie just recently. Prince def- 



initely has a lot of charisma and 
style on the stage, which the album 
doesn't quite recapture. 

All in all, this is a pretty solid 
effort by Prince and the Revolution, 
but to really appreciate it, you might 
want to see the movie. 



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12-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 29, 1984 

TV trivia quiz 



Career Placement services seniors 



By Paul Triponey 



To whom did Mork report at the 
end of each eipsode of Mork & Min- 
dy? Answer: He reported to 
Ofrson. 

"Nothing mirrors our life and 
times like the electronic eye of tele- 
vision. For more than 30 years, TV 
GUIDE has been writing the book on 
television every week," states David 
Sendler, TV GUIDE'S national sec- 
tion editor. "The TV GAME is both a 
nostalgic trip through the days of 
Lucy and Uncle Miltie, and an excit- 
ing journey through today's video 
environment — its people, its pro- 
grams, and the world we all exper- 
ience." 

Dealing with the earliest days of 
TV through early 1984, questions are 
divided into seven categories of pro- 
gramming: Drama (dramatic 
series, miniseries, dramatic spe- 
cials. Westerns, prime-time soaps), 
sports (professional and amateur), 
comedy (situation comedies), news 
(documentaries and special events), 
kids (children's shows, educational 
programs), movies (theatrical 
films, made-for-TV), and other TV 
(talk shows, daytime soaps, game 
shows, quiz programs) . 

Here's this week's sampling of TV 
trivia questions from each of the 
seven TV programming categories. 

Drama: Pamela Sue Martin por- 
trayed this teenaged sleuth in a late 
'70's ABC series. 

Comedy: How did Edith Bunker 
die? 



Movies: Name the father and son 
who both won Academy Awards for 
1948's "The Treasure of the Sierra 
Madre." 

News : What was notable about the 
meeting between Soviet Aleksei 
Leonov and American Thomas Staf- 
ford on July 17, 1975? 

Sports: He was the first player to 
win the Grand Slam of tennis twice. 

Kids: On TTje Shari Lewis aiow, 
Shari's puppets were Hush Puppy, 
Charlie Horse and 

Other TV: What popular 1950s co- 
median created the character Percy 
Dovetonsils? 

See below for answers. 

To determine your TV Trivia Quo- 
tient: 

6-7 correct - Amazing; 4-5 - Out- 
standing; 2-3 - Middling; 0-1 - Disap- 
pointing. 

All questions in TV GUIDE'S TV 
GAME were prepared and authenti- 
cated by the editors of TV GUIDE 
Magazine. The board game is de- 
signed for two to 20 players (ages 10 
to adult). 

(t3«A0M aiiua 'AX ""no '■^^^ i""! '"Pni 

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:uMor uos sm pu« uo^snii J31|«m :m|aow :ai|0Ji8 
V ■<(p4ui03 -.MUQ ^3a«M '■aivJO :SUaMSNV) 



NEWS TIP 
2380 



It is that time of year when a new 
batch of seniors is initiated into one 
of the most frightening activities of 
their college careers : the job hunt. 

Although some lucky individuals 
may already have their name on an 
office door somewhere, most don't 
even know where to begin. If you are 
a member of the latter group and 
want some help to get you started, 
stop in at the Career Placement Ser- 
vices in the Wilshire House, across 
from Ballentine Hall. 

The Career Placement Service 
makes no guarantees to employment 
seekers; it's not a magic job foun- 
tain. What it does offer is a host of 
valuable services designed to get 
graduates pointed in the right direc- 
tion. 



As far as its success rate in past 
years, Dr. Ralph Sheriff, director, 
says an accurate figure is nearly 
impossible to compute. Usually, on- 
campus interviewers will provide 
the office with the number of Clarion 
students they hire, but students who 
receive other interviews through the 
service often fail to report their job- 
status. Also, the office provides such 
a wide variety of services which lead 
to jobs, including job vacancy posi- 
tions, initial contacts, and resume 
writing help, that quantifiable data 
is often inappreciable or impossible 
to collect. 

The Office of Career Placement is 
an integral part of the universities' 
educational program. The office 
attempts to guide, advise and place 
its graduates, through a life time if 
necessary. It also offers help to un- 



derclassmen seeking summer 
employment, and alumni wishing to 
change careers. Some of the ser- 
vices provided by the office are help 
in establishing credentials (a file of 
personal data which is necessary for 
participation in on-campus inter- 
views), job bulletins, job seminars, 
resume and cover letter writing, and 
advice to assist in the overall job 
hunt (such as strategic interview 
techniques) . The office also provides 
various types of test applications 
and helpful publications to those who 
request them. 

Whether you're a senior readying 
for the job search or an underclass- 
man trying to gain some early in- 
sight into career preparation, all are 
welcome and encouraged to visit the 
office of Career Placement. To find 
out more, phone 226-2323, or stop in 
anytime Monday-Friday. 



"///////////////////////////////////////y////''//''//''y''^''^'^''' 



Classified 



■'////////y///////////////. 



Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,553/ 
year. Now hiring. For directory 
call 805-687-6000 ext. R-6334. 

Looking to earn extra cash this se- 
mester? Become our college 
Travel Representative. Enthus- 
iasm to travel a must. Excellent 
business/marketing majors. Call 
Bruce at 1-800-431-3124 or 1-914-434- 
6000 (N.Y. State only) 

Avon Representative needed on 
campus and in dormitories. New 
earnings programs. Clall 814-764- 
3446. 



Nice 2 bedroom trailer available 
now or spring semester. Call 226- 
5104. 

For sale: 1973 Buick Century. $850. 
Call 226-8617. 

Is it true you can buy jeeps for $44 
through the U.S. Government? 
Get the facts today! Call (312) 
742-1142 Ext. 3701. 

Guitar Lessons for beginners of all 
ages by experienced accustic gui- 
tarist, featuring: folk and coun- 
try, and easy and fun. For more 



information call 226-3388. 

Managers needed for Women's 
swim team. Call Becky Leas at 
X2453 or stop by 110 Tippin. 

"And the seed whose fruit is right- 
eousness is sown in peace by those 
who make peace." James 3: 18. 

All that is necessary for evil to tri- 
umph is that good men do nothing. 

The Word of Life Pentecostal Fel- 
lowship group meets Fridays at 6 
p.m. in the Campbell Hall base- 
ment. 



Our Baskin-Robbins store 
is having a Birthday P^rty! 

Celebrate with these special offers 
at THE 800 CENTER 






Tana Shear's Cut-a-thon. Lori Oelacey and Marcia Bless, photo by Chuck Lizza 

Tana Shear cuts for M D 



By Darren B. Fouse 



Offers Good Sept. 27, 28, & 29 

Our store is having a birthday and we're 

going to make it feel like your party! 

Bring in the whole family to enjoy our 

special party atmosphere and our special 
offers on selected ice cream items. 



BASKIN-ROBBINS (M) ICE CREAM STORE 

^V^^P^' ©1980 Baskin-Hobbins Ice Cream Company 



Tana-Shear donated $325 to the 
Muscular-Dystrophy Fund following 
an all day Cut-a-thon held Saturday, 



JOB HUNTING? 

Our Computerized 

Resume Service 

will help. 

Write for 
Details and 
Price List. 

PER-SPEC 

Dept. C Box 366 
Hummelstown, PA 17036 



Sept. 15. 

A total of 106 people, primarily 
CUP students, received hair cuts at 
the cost of $5 or $8 with blow drying. 

The Cut-a-thon also offered free 
entertainment with balloons and a 
clown. WCCB Radio covered the 
Cut-a-thon airing live from the Tana- 
Shear. Refreshments and door 
prizes, furnished by many 800 
Center stores, were awarded to the 
participants. 

Next month Tana-Shear will also 
be providing hair and make-up prep- 
arations for the Homecoming and 
Autumn Leaf Pageant candidates. 

Rita Snyder, manager and coor- 
dinator of the M.D. fund drive would 
like to thank all the students who 
came out and donated to the cause. 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984—13 



Eagle golfers place at Rock tourney 



By Jeff Harvey 




The Golden Eagles golf squad 
traveled to Slippery Rock University 
Sept. 16 and 17 for a 54-hole exhibi- 
tion match. There were 12 teams 
competing in this tournament, with 
Clarion once again taking second 
place honors behind lUP. 

lUP had squeaked out a victory 
one week earlier over Clarion in the 
Gannon tournament by just one 
stroke. At Slippery Rock, however, 
the Eagles were downed by 11 
strokes. 

Last week's action saw Don 
Dimoff, a Clarion junior, capture 
second medalist honors at Slippery 
Rock with a 222. 

Juniors Bill Sarsfield and Pete 
Leene finished their 54 holes with a 
227 and a 235, respectively. Seniors 
Mike Czap and Bruce Chase tallied a 
237 and a 242 for Clarion. Jim Alci- 



bade, a sophomore, finished the 
tournament with a 244. 

Czap was chosen to be captain of 
the Eagles golf squad by coach 
Frank Lignelli for the 1985 spring 
season. 

Last week's Slippery Rock tour- 
ney was played at three different 



sites: Sunday at Dubbs Dredd, Mon- 
day morning at Lake Arthur, and 
Monday afternoon at Armoco Com- 
munity College. 

This week's golf action will see the 
Golden Eagles travelling to Youngs- 
town Sept. 25 and Allegheny College 
Sept. 27. 




& Country Cleaners 

829 Center Mall, Clarion, PA 



. Tuxedo Sales and Rental 

.Alterations 

. Professional Dry Cleaning 

Shirt Laundry Service 



Placekicker Eric FairiMnks kicks winning fieidgoal to edge Shippensburg 16-13. 
See page 16 for aii the action p^oto by Rich Herman 

Male cheerleaders add 
new twist to spirit squad 



By Shelly Eckenroth 



As the majority of the college 
campus is catching their last hour of 
sleep, five guys and eight girls are 
[H*acticing new cheers and stunts for 
the upcoming football games. 

Clarion University cheerleading 
added a new angle to the 1984 foot- 
ball season when Captain Jana 
Moore suggested that male cheer- 
leaders be added to the squad. Joe 
Boyer, John Brion, Andy Angell, 
Tim Veler and Brian Shire became 
Clarion University history when 
they were chosen as the first male 
cheerleaders. 

When asked what interested them 
to become a male cheerleader, the 
majority of them said it was some- 
thing they always wanted to do. 
They all have a distinct interest in 
football and got involved to project 
school spirit. 

The girls felt it has been a great 
asset to have the guys on the squad. 
Jana Moore says, "The guys have 
improved 100 percent since practice 
started in mid-August." The squad 
as a whole is like one big family 
working together to obtain the same 
goal — spirit. 

l^e guys felt they received a good 
bit of flack priw to their furst per- 



formance, but now ttiey are finding 
that the college students are grad- 
ually accepting the idea. Tim Veler 
said, "People (k)n't understand how 
tough cheerleading actually is; they 
make joking comments, but they 
don't realize cheerleading is a sport 
and we are athletes." 

When asked if the guys will return 
for the 1985 season, they all replied, 
"most definitely." The squad en- 
courages anyone interested to show 
up at a practice and see what it's 
really like. The squad is presently 
looking for new recruits for the bas- 
ketball season. If interested contact 
Jana Moore or one of the squad 
members. 



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PH. 814-226-4534 




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RQimer Center 
Clarion University of Pa. 

226-2406 

Open Weelcdays 7:30 a.m. - 11 p.m. 

We the Wooda family would like to 
Introduce ourselves because we've 
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you'll love us! 

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ONLY DREAM ABOUTI 



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This week's special is our double bacon 
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14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 27, 1984 

Three Clarion swimmers 
go for Olympic gold 



By Michelle Michael 



Being a part of the Olympic tra- 
dition is a goal strived for by many 
athletes, and three of Clarion's 
swimmers, (Vic Ruberry, Jeanne 
O'Connor, and Chris Seufert) were a 
part of the 1984 Olympic tradition. 

Vic Ruberry, a native of Somerset, 
Bermuda, and a senior biology and 
psychology major at Clarion, com- 
peted for Bermuda in the 100 and 200 
iH-eaststroke events. 

A seven-time NCAA Division II 
All-American at Clarion, Ruberry 
competed at the McDonald's Swim 
Center on the campus of the Univer- 
sity of Southern California. Ruberry 
set a new national record for his 
country, Bermuda. 

Ruberry qualified for the 
Bermuda team by his NCAA 
Division II time in the 100-yard 
breaststroke (57.60). He was the solo 
swimming representative on the 
Bermuda team. 

Swimming for only seven years, 
24-year-old Ruberry has competed 
in such events as the 1979 Pan Amer- 
ican Games, Central America and 
Caribbean Games in 1982, and the 
British Commonwealth Games in 
1983, representing his native coun- 
try, Bermuda. 

Men's coach. Bill Miller, stated, 
"We're certainly glad he's decided 
to swim his senior year at Clarion 
even though the training for the 
Olympics has been gruehng." 

A 1984 Clarion graduate, Jeanne 
O'Connor, qualified for the Olympic 
trials this summer at Indianapolis, 
Indiana, where she searched for a 
spot on the team as a backstroker. 

O'Connor made it to the finals. 



USA's top 12, where they take the 
first two finishers to the Olympics, 
but she was unable to make a spot 
for herself on the Olympic team. 

A co-captain for Clarion's 1983 and 
1984 Women's Swim team, O'Connor 
earned 28 NCAA Division II All- 
American rankings in her collegiate 
career, the maximum number of 
honors which can be earned. 

O'Connor holds nine national 
titles, seven school records and one 
Division I title. In addition to this, 
she is the only Clarion swimmer to 
qualify for the trials, though some 
divers have qualified in the past. 

Diving for the USA Olympic team, 
Chris Seufert, won the Bronze medal 
in the three-meter board. 

Seufert, who competed for Clarion 
in 1975 and in 1976, holds records in 
the one- and three-meter boards at 
Clarion. Representing Clarion in 
1976, Seufert placed 15th at Nationals 
in the three meter board. 

Seufert transferred to Michigan in 

1976, and graduated there in 1978. 
While she attended Michigan she 
achieved the AIAW Division I title in 
the one- and three-meter boards in 

1977. She was also on the US Cham- 
pionship List for the 1980 Olympics. 

These three swimmers were 
coached at Clarion by the men's 
coach, Mr. Bill Miller, the women's 
coach, Ms. Becky Rutt-Leas, and the 
diving coach, Mr. Don Leas. i 



Sports Tip 
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Susl« Satnor helps Lady Splkers get season off to "booming" start. See game details on next page 




Women's tennis co-captalns (l-r): Kim DeMalo and Lynn Fye will hold the team 
together throug the 1984 season. photo by Renee Rosensteel 



Sports I 



photo by Eric Hill 

Netten . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 

With the score tied 3-3, the 
women's doubles teams needed at 
least two victories in order to ensure 
a victory; instead they won all three. 
The teams of Suzie Fritz and Lynn 
Fye won 10-6. Kim DeMaio and 
Dawn Funya capped off a fantastic 
day with a devastating lO-l win, and 
Darla Kneebone and Bena Hefflin 
were victorious by a 10-5 score. 

Coach Norbert Baschnagel was 
"very pleased by the way the girls 
came back from adversity. Kim and 
Dawn played terriffic doubles by 
communicating and working well 
together, and Suzie Fritz and Lynn 
Fye also played well in both their 
singles and doubles matches. ' ' 

"They're a young competitive 
team," stated a proud Coach Bas- 
chnagel. "They hang tough and 
really work hard." 

The young team goes after victory 
number three this Thursday when 
Indiana visits, and over the weekend 
they will take on Mercyhurst. 



SUPPORT THE 

WOMEN'S SWIM TEAM 

1984 NCAA National Champs 



OX- 



Buy a |«*cgona|a» mUkshake on 
Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 29 & 30 

and 10 ^ of your purchase goes 
to support the swim team 




TANA 
HEAR 



800 Center 



226-8551 



The Complete 
Beauty Salon 

Tanning Booth $2.00 

Ear Piercing $6.00 

10% OFF 
w/CUP ID 

(Ear Piercing and Tanning Booth 
not included) 

Nine hair care specialists are wait- 
ing to give you top-notch styles of 
the 80's. 

Rita, Cathy, Jessie, Pam, 

Debbie, Darlyne, Kathy, Lori 

and Mary 

Walk-Ins Welcome 




THE CURION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984-15 



Harriers take 10th 



Junior "tplker" Sua S«anor r«gist«rs anothar "kill' 



photo by Eric Hill 



Winning weight program 
for winning team 



By David Pound 



The current weight training pro- 
gram for the Golden Eagle football 
team has been a significant factor in 
their success as a winning team. It 
has definitely increased overall 
team strength, quickness, and flex- 
ibility. 

Since 1980, the weight training pro- 
gram of the football players at Qar- 
ion has increased considerably. In 
the past, only a few members of the 
team were serious lifters, whereas 
now, 75 percent of the players are 
seriously involved in the program. 
Even during the off season, 60 
percent of the players lift. Some of 
the incoming freshmen are as strong 
as the upperclass players. A great 
deal of credit is due to the improving 
weight programs of high school 
teams. 

Golden Eagle players are getting 
increasingly stronger and faster 
every year. The weight training pro- 
gram consists of building for 
strength, power, and cardiovascular 



fitness. This concentrates on 
improving the upper body, legs, and 
back. 

Head Coach Gene Sobolewski has 
introduced a total fitness program. 
It includes flexibility, cardiovascu- 
lar, and strength training. All three 
exercises go hand-in-hand to pro- 
duce a compl^dy physicaUy fit per- 
son. It is a tailored program that 
everyone follows. Major muscle 
areas that are emphasized are the 
chest and shoulders, neck, hips, 
back and legs. Most important of 
these are the hips, back, and legs. 
Every player is given a basic lift 
program to follow that consists of 13 
different exercises. It is not manda- 
tory that the players lift, however, it 
is the players' responsibility to 
improve by doing whatever it takes. 

The whole purpose of weight 
training is to decrease major and 
minor injuries. Many of these injur- 
ies are due to a lack of flexibility. 
The main areas of concentration for 
decreasing injuries are the back, 
neck, and legs. Weight training has 
decreased minor (nagging) injuries- 



sprains, pulled muscles, etc. Major 
injuries still do occur, but with 
continuous weight training, the 
severity could be lesstoed. 

Players are tested in the sfHing on 
the bench press, the military press, 
bar dips, and pull ups. In the fall 
they are tested on Uie bench and 
military press. Testing in other 
areas are excluded so players do not 
strain themselves in an exercise 
which may cause an injury to occur. 
Since 1980, team strength has in- 
creased 30-40 percent mainly in 
three areas: bench press, military 
press, and squats. 

The vast improvement of the 
weight training program introduced 
by Coach Sobolewski and his coach- 
ing staff has been an important 
factor in Clarion's spectacular 
record during the past year. It has 
been a major contributing factor in 
last year's PSAC Championship, and 
the current No. 3 ranking in Sports 
lUustrated's Division II poll. 



The men's cross-country team 
competed at lUP on Saturday, Sept. 
22 in the lUP invitational. The meet 
was rated one of the top invitationals 
in the NCAA North-East Region, as 
it was a preview to the NCAA Di- 
vision II Regional Championships to 
be held in November. The top teams 
were there from Division II as well 
as members of Division I. 

The Clarion Golden Eagles ran in 
their characteristic group as they 
captured a 10th place finish out of 17 
teams competing. Leading Clarion 
for the day was senior co-captain 
Scott DeLaney, who finished a 
strong 26th out of a very talented 
field of runners. According to Coach 
English, it was DeLaney's most out- 
standing run over his collegiate ca- 
reer. Despite the heat, the rough ter- meet. 

Lady Spikers travel to 
Bucknell tourney 



rain, and poor footing, he ran the 
10,000 meter run in a time that 
equalled his best time on the road. 
With the quality of runners compet- 
ing, finishing in the top 25 percent 
was quite an accomplishment. 

Finishing close behind DeLaney 
was senior co-captain Bob Smith, 
sophomore Greg Garstecki, and Jim 
Snyder, and juniors Doug McConnell 
and Pellegrino Cicarello. It was a 
nice grouping by the team that is 
lacking a front runner this year. It 
was the type of race they will have to 
run in all the large invitationals and 
championship meets. Coach English 
is expecting that group to tighten up 
as the season progresses. 

On Wednesday the team competed 
at St. Bona venture University in 
New York. It was the second dual 



By Tiki Kahle 



This past Tuesday, Sept. 18, the 
Lady Eagles traveled to Robert 
Morris College to have an evening 
tri-match against Carlow College 
and Robert Morris. The Lady Eagles 
opened against Carlow playing a 
well executed match with their own 
style of play and won in two games, 
15-4, 15-4. Against Robert Morris 
they were also able to play their own 
style of ball and won 15-6, 15-13. 

On Friday the 21, the Lady Eagles 
traveled to Bucknell University to 
play in an eight-team tournament. 
They opened Friday night against 
Cornell University and won 15-8, 16- 
4, then played Bucknell University 
and lost 11-15, 9-15. Saturday they 
started against St. Francis and won 
15-4, 15-5. This gave them a 2-1 



record for pool play and a tie for first 
in their pool. By statistical proced- 
ure they had to play off against 
Bucknell to determine places. They 
played a single game against Buck- 
nell and lost 15-6, this put them in 
third place for pool play. For their 
first game in bracket play they were 
up against Howard University and 
lost to them in three games 15-5, 11- 
15, 11-15. This loss ended their tour- 
nament play and gave them a tour- 
nament record of 2-2. 

The Lady Eagles' overall record is 
6-4 and they have two big games this 
week. On Thursday, Sept. 27, they 
travel to lUP and on Saturday the 29 
they host Slippery Rock in what 
should be a very exciting and tough 
match. Saturday's match is at 10 
a.m. so come show your support as 
they take on Slippery Rock. 



CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES 
NEEDED FOR LOCAL DISTRIBUTOR 
MUST BE AT LEAST 21 YEARS OF AGE 

Looking for outstanding and athletic persons. 
Job requires organizing campus events, distribution 
of promotional materials, etc. . . 

TO SET UP LOCAL INTERVIEW 
CALL DENNIS AT (814) 432-8816 




It Is against the law when riding a bicycle in Denver, 
Colorado, to lift your feet higher than the front wheel. 



OFFICE: (814) 226-8742 HOME: (814) 226-7316 

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Tuesday, Oct. 2 

Come early, sKow starts at 9 p.m. 
Advanced Tickets Advised! 






16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 27, 1984 



Golden Eagles slip by Red Raiders 16-13 



By Mike Kondracki 

Eric Fairbank's last second 26- 
yard field goal proved to be the mar- 
gin in the Golden Eagles' 16-13 
victory over Shippensburg on Sat- 
urday. 

The Golden Eagles' offense was 
sparked by the return of receiver 
Terry McFetridge, and running 
back Elton Brown to the line-up. Mc- 
Fetridge led the Golden Eagles in 
receptions with six, for a total of 112 
yards, and one touchdown, while 
Brown led the Golden Eagle ground 
attack with 93 yards on 27 carries. 

The Golden Eagle defense was put 
to the test by a stubborn Shippens- 
burg offense, but the Golden E]agles 
came up with the big play when they 



had to. The defense was led by ends 
Jim Trovato and Jon Hasslett, both 
of which registered quarterback 
sacks, by the front line of Dom Brog- 
lia, Kevin Ewing, and John Hughes, 
and the linebacking core of Bob Jar- 
osinski and Jerry Hasslett. The 
Golden Eagle defensive unit held the 
Shippensburg Red Raiders to just 31 
yards rushing for the game. 

Garion took the opening half kick- 
off and began their opening drive at 
their own 20-yard line. A completion 
to tight end Bill Frohlich gave the 
Golden Eagles a first down on their 
own 37-yard line. Consecutive car- 
ries by Elton Brown advanced the 
ball to the Shippensburg 34-yard line 
where the drive stalled as Pat Car- 
bol's pass was intercepted by Ship- 



pensburg defensive back Mark Brez- 
itski. 

On their first possession Shippens- 
burg was forced to punt, and the 
Golden Eagles took over on the Red 
Raider 48. Two plays later Pat Car- 
bol connected with Terry McFet- 
ridge on a 45-yard scoring strike that 
gave the Eagles the early lead. 

Following the kickoff, Shippens- 
burg marched from their own 20- 
yard line to the Golden Eagle 37 
behind the passing of quarterback 
Mark Beans. John Hanna then ended 
the Shippensburg threat as he inter- 
cepted Mark Beans' next passing at- 
tempt, and returned it to Shippens- 
burg's 20-yard line. 

The Golden Elagles capitalized on 
the Red Raider mistake and after a 




Pictured is one of a string of QB sacks the eagles recorded against Shippensburg. 



photo by Rich Herman 



Pat Carbol to Bob Green pass, Eric 
Fairbanks added a 27-yard field goal 
to put the Golden Eagles up 10-0. 

Phil Bujakowski's kickoff was re- 
turned to the Shippensburg 36-yard 
line, and the Red Raiders took over 
on downs. After a series of passing 
attempts, Beans connected with 
Mike Brady for a 53-yard touchdown 
pass to close to 10-7, with 2: 18 left in 
the first quarter. There was no furth- 
er scoring in the second quarter, and 
the score remained 10-7 at the half. 

Shippensburg took the second half 
kickoff, and began at their own 32- 
yard line. After a series of first 
downs Shippensburg advanced the 
ball to the Clarion 43-yard line. 
Beans then completed a 15-yard pass 
to Tyrone Reed, and a six-yard pass 
to Jdin Kerchner and set iq) a 38- 
yard field goal by Barry Jackson. 
The field goal tied the score at 10. 

Following a Clarion punt, Siip- 
pensburg had the ball again, but 
this time the drive stalled at the 
Clarion 28 where Jackson's field 
goal attempt was no good. 

Clarion took over on downs, and 
advanced the ball to the Shippens- 
burg 22. Carbol's pass to FroMich in 
the endzone was incomplete, and the 
third quarter ended with the score 
tied 10-10. 

The Golden Eagles took the lead 
early in the fourth quarter on a 32- 
yard field goal by Eric Fairbanks. 

Phil Bujakowski's kickoff sailed 
into the endzone and Shippensburg 
had the ball on their own 20. Mark 
Beans then moved the Red Raiders 
down field to the Golden Eagle five 
yard line, but a quarterback sack 
moved them back to the 10 and Ship- 
pensburg was forced to settle for a 
field goal. The field goal tied the 
game once again 13-13. 

Following a Oarion punt on their 
next possession, Shippensburg had 
the ball on their own 30. From there 
quarterback Mark Beans coughed 
up the football and Jerry Haslett re- 
covered it at the Siippensburg 30- 
yard line. On the next play, however, 



the Golden Eagles fumbled it back to 
the Red Raiders, and Shippensburg 
had the ball at th eir own 20. Three 
plays later Jim Trovato intercepted 
a Mark Beans pass, and gave the 
Golden Eagles the ball on the Red 
Raider 20-yard line. Elton Brown 
then carried the ball to the Shippens- 
burg 14 to set up a Eric Fairbanks 
field goal. Fairbanks' 31-yard 
attempt was wide and the score re- 
mained 13-13 with 3:56 to play in the 
game. 

Shippensburg took over on downs, 
and following a quarterback sack by 
Kevin Ewing and Jon Hasslett, and 
another sack by Jim Trovato, Ship- 
pensburg was forced to punt. 

The Golden Eagles took over on 
their own 35-yard line with 1:47 to 
play, and executed the two minute 
drill to set up the winning field goal. 
Pat Carbol completed a pass to 
Terry McFetridge to the 
Shippensburg 43-yard line, and 
Elton Brovm then carried to the 39. 
Carbol then connected with Bob 
Green for 28 yards down to the aiip- 
pensburg 11 yard line. The Golden 
Eagles then ran three consecutive 
running plays to run down the time 
on Uie game clock before calling on 
placekicker Eric Fairbanks. With 
four seconds left in the game Fair- 
banks' 26-yard field goal split the up- 
rights, and the Golden Eagles de- 
feated the Shippensburg Red 
Raiders 16-13. 

Tlie Golden Eagles will face Cal- 
ifornia at home this weekend. Kick- 
off is slated for 1 : 30 p.m. 




MOR^tat 




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One coupon per customer 
Cheese, tomato extra and tax extra 
where applicable. 

Offer Expires Oct. 4, 1984 

■ ■■■■■■■■■■I 



Students pay for cost of education increases 



By Jacqueline Root 



As students across the nation start 
fall classes, they are finding a mixed 
tuition picture. While scattered col- 
leges and universities have man- 
aged to hold increases to a min- 
imum, many others have imposed 
tuition hikes well above the inflation 
rate, and on only one campus in the 
country tuition is down. 

TTie College Board predicted the 
total collie costs which include 



room and board, books, supplies, 
transportation, and personal ex- 
pense as well as tuition will go up 
an average of six percent this fall. 

Here at Clarion the increase in 
tuition and room and board has risen 
5.6 percent, or $190, since last year. 

In the state of Washington, a 
freeze was imposed for the 1984-85 
year. This could translate into a 24 
percent increase during the '85-87 
period at state universities, says 



Kate Brown of the Washington As- 
sociation of Community Colleges. 

The cost of education continues to 
climb, she notes, and while inflation 
is only up four to five percent na- 
tionally, the Higher Education Price 
Index, which measure the cost of 
goods and services to colleges, is 
running at 10 to 11 percent increases. 
According to a National Center for 
Education Statistics report releas- 
ed, colleges this year alone will 



spend a total of $85.5 billion. 

Only one school in the country has 
managed to roll back the tuition in- 
creases this year. At George Wash- 
ington med school, first through 
third year students will pay 1.3 per- 
cent, or about $250, less than last 
year. Fourth year students get a $100 
decrease from $17,000 to $16,900. 

Even tiny roll-backs like these are 
rare nation-wide, as many schools 
have imposed double-digit increases 



again this fall. For example, Penn 
State's increase is 10.8 percent for 
1984-85. An administrative study at 
PSU shows costs have increased 170 
percent since 1972. 

"There is no trend toward freezing 
or raising tuition," says Brooke 
Breslow of the College Board. There 
will be different states and institu- 
tions each year that stay stable for a 
few years and then go up while there 
are others that experience a freeze." 




Vol.56, No. 4 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 



ClojUmj (Ltu>mxtj(/ 0^ Pwu^i^hnmA/ 




Brilliant glass works by Labi no 
now on display at Sand ford Gallery 



By Paul Triponey 



Whether in the form of a plate, a 
mirror, or a beer mug, glass is a ma- 
terial that we all use everyday with 
little, if any, attention. But that 
same glass in the hands of an artist 
"becomes a thing of beauty, a one- 
time effusion of the imagination, 
frozen in time." (Boris Nelson, The 
Todedo Blade. Jan. 29, 1984). 

Clarion University has the ex- 
treme pleasure to experience the art 



years in glass crafting, will be 
sharing his brilliant talent and love 
for glass in the Sandford Art Gallery 
through October 17. 

Few of today's glass craftsmen 
can lay claim to the abundant know- 
ledge of the medium as Labino, who 
has shown his great love for glass in 
countless examples. From experi- 
ments in ancient glass techniques to 
glass murals and hot-glass sculp- 
tures to photo-sensitive glass vases, 
his experience is nearly unmatched. 
He was involved in the development 



of one of the most inventive and 

technically advanced men working of special glass fibers which helped 

in glass today. Dominick Labino, insulate the Apollo, Mercury and 

who on February 14 will celebrate 50 Gemini spacecrafts against extreme 




TrM« iMgin to scatter thdr dead iMvts on Clarion as fail raachet Its colorful 
paak. . .Just In lima for ALF. Chack tlM Clarion Call fw Infcmnation about all tha 
fastlvalavanls. photo by Chris Zawrotuk 



heat and the tiles which cover the 
space shuttle, Columbia. 

When Nick Labino brings his ex- 
hibit to Clarion this month, he'll be 
returning to the country where his 
career in glass began. He got his 
start at the Owens-Illinois glass con- 
tainer manufacturing plant on 
Grand Ave. His industrial work in- 
cludes extensive research and de- 
velopment of glass composition, 
glass processes, glass fiber forming 
machines, glass paper, and glass 
furnace design. As he worked and 
encountered problems for which no 
tool could be adapted or improved, 
he would invent one. This has re- 
sulted in hundreds of patents, in for- 
eign countries as well as the United 
States. His accomplishments 
include the development of a 
furnace and a new glass formula 
that permits glass to melt at a lower 
temperature, revolutionizing the 
(See Glass, Page 2) 



Chamber appoints 
Goble vice-president 



Rick Goble, owner of Coble's Fu- 
neral Home in Clarion, has been re- 
cently appointed as Vice President 
of the Greater Clarion Area 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Goble fills the position, as the past 
Vice President, Dr. William Ross 
takes over as President of the Cham- 
ber, after the resignation of Keith 
Martin. 

Rick will retain the position until 
February, when a new board of di- 
rectors will be elected. 

Active in the Chamber, Rick 
served as board member prior to his 
appointment as Vice President. He 
also has been chairman of the Go- 
Kart races for the past two years. 

Concerning the Chamber, Rick 
feels that the Clarion Chamber has 
developed into a county-wide or- 
ganization, and is glad to see that it 
has grown and is still growing. 



Rick was born and raised in 
Clarion and he and his wife Sue just 
had their first child, a daughter, 
Lindsay. 




RICK GOBLE 



Campus Christian organizations offer 
fellowship, counseling and recreation 



By Shawn Ryan 



There are presently four Chris- 
tian-related organizations on 
Clarion University campus which 
offer various activities and pro- 
grams for interested students, each 
with unique qualities which conform 

to different needs. 

The Newman Association 

The Newman Association is a 
Catholic social club which exists to 
develop strong Christian fellowship 
among members and provide stu- 
dents with the opportunity to grow 
spiritually and personally. This is its 
first year on campus and, under the 
leadership of Association president 
Barb Marchwinski, vice president 
Shari McClory and chaplain Father 
Samuel Bungo. There are several 
activities planned. 

These include: bowling, roller 
skating, movies, pizza parties, 
camping, dances, retreats, special 
masses, "game" nights, and social 
meetings. The Newman Association 
is in the process of organizing a 
Newman Center Lounge across from 
Mr. Donut near the Immaculate 
Conception Church for members. 
TTie group also sponsors the "Free to 
be Me" film series with author John 
Powell. This is a nine-week practical 
{H'ogram in developing positive at- 



titudes about life, self, others, and 
God. Each session lasts 45 minutes. 

Ms. Marchwinski stated that 
though the Newman Association is 
primarily a Catholic social club, 
others are welcome. She said that 
interested students can become in- 
volved by attending the meetings, 
which are advertised, and that it is 
not too late to take part in the "Free 
to be Me" series which meets in the 
Newman Center Lounge on Thurs- 
days at 7 p.m. She went on to say 
that it is free to belong and that there 
are about 30 members. 

The next meeting will be held on 
October 3 and there will be a hayride 
on Oct. 7. 

The Newman Association is spon- 
sored in part by the Erie Diocese. 
Fundraisers will be held to deter the 
cost of activities. 

Koinonia Christian Fellowship 

Koinonia Christian Fellowship, 
under the leadership of president 
Robert Struble and vice president 



Todd Aughton, provides an atmo- 
sphere of worship in which students 
from any denominational or 
religious background can partici- 
pate and a host of social activities 
which provide Christian fellowship 
and an alternative to the social ac- 
tivities prevalent on a college cam- 
pus. 

Acting advisor Dwight Dunn said 
the primary purpose of Koinonia 
Christian Fellowship is to present 
the Gospel. Rob Struble added that 
it is also a good way to meet people. 
He went on to state that it is free. 

Some of the activities provided by 
the group include: weekly meetings, 
(See Religion, Page 15) 

Directories available 

Off campus and commuter stu- 
dents may pick up a copy of the 
Campus Director in the Student Ac- 
tivities Office in 105 Riemer during 
regular hours. A valid CUP. ID. 
must be shown. 



ON THE INSIDE 



Editorial 2 

CanipalQn '84 3 

ALF grand marshall 5 

Seranton 7 

Yakov Smirnoff 7 



Classifieds 8 

introducing 9 

Anderson review 10 

River Runners 14 

Football 16 




2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 




Okay - so Indiana University has the ugliest men, according to Lisa 
Bimbach's College Book. Maybe they'll try to beat the Golden Eagles 
with ugly stares during the Homecoming football game. I doubt it; 1 
understand nothing can stop our champs from keeping their title. 

But is that what Clarion is known for - the most athletic teams with 
outstanding records? There's got to be more to boast about. 

Bimbach says the University of Alaska has the most food to offer its 
students, yet the same university has the ugliest women and the most 
serious drinkers. Interesting. So if we have the most athletic teams with 
outstanding records, do we also have the most muscle-bound students? 

Some other possibilities for nationwide distinction of Clarion include 
most future fashion models, most ROTC cadets and most famous 
buffalo farm. These are just suggestions mind you, but then Bimbach 
determined Boston University as the most promiscuous, Rollins College 
(Winter Park, Fla.) as the least political and Carnegie-Mellon University 
as having the most computer nerds. 

So now I ask you, oh well-informed readers, what off-beat, wild, 
uniquely amusing things should Clarion be known for? 

If you have an idea - an idea thoroughly thought out and completely 
and concisely written - let us know about it. Submit your idea to the 
Call office, Room 1 Harvey Hall, by Friday, Oct. 12 at noon. We'll print 
those ideas deemed most clever in an upcoming issue of the Call. 



Editor of the best campus newspaper 
Karen E. Hale 






CONOR A TULA TIONS 



Denise 







& Scott 



n. 



Best wishes VJC^ for all the 
love and luck! 

from the executive board of ttie Clarion Call 



(i^The Clarion Call 

^^^^ Room 1 Harvey Hall 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief 

News Editor 

Features Editor 

Sports Editor 

Photography Editor . 



KAREN HALE 

. . MICHAEL DOWNING 
. . . . MICHELE LaTOUR 

CHRIS STURNtCK. 

CHUCK LI2ZA 



Ad Design Editor 

Ad Sales Manager . . . 

Business Manager . . 

. Circulation Manager . 

Advisor 

Consulting Editor . . . 



ANITA KOTRICK 

.... CLARKE SPENCE 
. . . . PHIL DONATELLI 
....DENISE SHEEKY 

ART BARLOW 

.... THERESA WAIDA 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Per Agate Line S .34 



Mail Subscription Rates: 

Pw Semester $5 

Per Academic Year $8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 



Non-traditional students 
organize to meet special needs 



By Michele LaTour 
Features Editor 



There are 500 students over 25 
years of age that attend Clarion Uni- 
versity. They are referred to as non- 
traditional students or returning 
adults. 

A new organization has been 
formed to meet the needs of these 
students. The organization is for re- 
turning adults/commuters. They 
are based in Harvey Hall basement. 

The organization was brought 
about through a subcommittee of Af- 
firmative Action and Dr. Anne Day. 
There has been nothing but good re- 
sponses from returning adults and 
also support from Clarion University 
faculty and staff. 

The purpose of the organization is 
to fulfill the special needs of the re- 
turning adults. The need for affilia- 
tion is one of importance. The adults 
need to be informed on all activities 
and events on campus. 

The organization allows everyone 
to pool ideas and problems together 
and to provide support. Each stu- 
dent can help each other deal with 
problems also faced in the home of 
the adult. Problems such as with the 

Glass.... 

(Continued from Page 1) 

field of glass art. Other proofs of his 
inventiveness include glass paper 
and a tiny electric motor which fits 
nearly in a hickory nut. 

Labino is a man filled with insa- 
tiable curiosity, and he continues his 
experiements in glass today. The 
more than 100 museums, univer- 
sities, public and private collections 
which proudly include his pieces are 
more than exemplary of the world- 
wide recognition he enjoys. An 
expert as well in carving, metal 
casting, and enameling on copper, 
he combines his scientific know- 
ledge to create a multitude of high 
quality objects. As one study's his 
work, it must be realized that the 
pieces are not only beautiful, but 
each one is a new experiment, a new 
advancement in glass crafting. 
Through his many artistic, scientific 
and other talents, it's easy to see 
how Nick Labino was once referred 
to as "a true 20th century Rennai- 
sance man." (You can meet Mr. 
Labino at an open reception in Sand- 
ford Art Gallery on Oct. 14 from 2-4 
p.m.) 



nonsupport of children and spouse. 

When Peggy Howard, chairman of 
returning adults/commuters, was 
asked if she felt being a college 
student at a later time in life created 
a disadvantage, she said it can be 
but our life experiences and matur- 
ity are definitely an advantage. 

Howard also feels she has made 
some very special friends at Clarion 
even though there is an age differ- 
ence. 

The organization for returning 
adults/commuters hopes that their 
organization will be introduced by 
the Admissions Office to all new re- 
turning adults that plan to attend 
Clarion in the future. 

An open house is scheduled for 
Tuesday, Oct. 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 



p.m. The open house is to kick off the 
returning adults/commuters organ- 
ization and will be held in Harvey 
Hall basement. 

The open house will host three 
guest speakers: Dr. Barbara Wood, 
from the returning adults program 
from Penn State University; Dr. 
Bollend from Clarion University 
Psychology Department and Hal 
Wassink, Coordinator of Student Ac- 
tivities. 

Through the year, programs will 
be given in Harvey Hall by the re- 
turning adults/commuters organiza- 
tion dealing with: assertion, time 
managing and test anxiety. Anyone 
is welcome to attend. Dates will be 
posted at a later date. 



Necessity keeps Becht open 



By Nancy Umbaugh 



Becht Hall renovations: $100,000 
for new electrical services a few 
years ago, $35,000 for new porches 
and gutters last year, and $100,000 
for new plumbing in 1985. 

These figures raise the question 
whether this is short term first-aid 
or will the ivy-covered building stay 
open indefinitely? 

The answer: Becht Hall will 
remain open as long as needed. 

Other repairs are slated for 
Becht: the lounges on first floor are 
to be upgraded; while better heat 
control measures on the radiators 
and new furniture are also top 
priorities. 

The demand for women's housing 
and other contributing factors are 
why Becht's doors have and will 
remain open. 

Nine years ago Clarion University 
requested funds to build a new dor- 
mitory and as of yet, they are not 
foreseen in the near future. 

With such large sums being allo- 
cated for repairs, why is a new dorm 
not built? Dr. Nair, Vice President 
of Student Affairs, said there is a 
long process to go through, begin- 
ning with a request to the Depart- 
ment of General Services in Harris- 
burg. 

The next step is to acquire a state 
appointed architect whose plans are 
then cleared through the Art Com- 
mission. This assures that the build- 
ing is aesthetically appealing. 

The next step, of choosing the con- 



tractor, is done by submission of the 
lowest bid; however, due to inflation 
and length of the process the allo- 
cation is usually not enough. When 
this happens the plans are revised. 

The actual construction and fur- 
nishing of the building takes approx- 
imately 18 to 24 months. 

This overall process — a major 
reason why a new dorm is not built— 
takes atx)ut seven years. 

When money is a factor universi- 
ties compete for state funding along 
with other facilities in the state, such 
as: hospitals, prisons, etc. . . 

Dr. Nair said, "Someday, perhaps 
the university system will be able to 
build buildings through its own agen- 
cy." But until that time all reno- 
vations must be state approved. 

The moorish style and architect- 
ural significance have Becht H^U 
registered as a National Historic 
Landmark. Thus, a final element 
why Becht Hall remains standing. 



You realize of course this method 
of discipline is ar chaic and onl 
tends to illuminate 



the inadequacies ("' TcV":""" 
in your educational pv^ 
backgrniind. ^ 





i^ZANCO 



CPS 








THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984-3 



Nation's S.A. T. scores increase 



By Michael J. Downing 



The women of the United States 
can decide the outcome of the 1^ 
presidential election. One of the rea- 
sons for this is that women voters 
outnumber men voters in 24 of the 25 
largest states in the U.S. The second 
is that women comprise 53 percent 
of the nation's population as a whole. 

However, one problem that 
women may face this year is voting 
apathy. In 1980 almost 50 million 
women voted out of a possible 82 
million. Some 32 million absent 
votes could easily decide an election. 

This year, with Geraldine Ferraro 
running as the vice-presidential can- 
didate on the Democratic ticket, 
women are enjoying their most in- 
fluential period in poUtical history. 
Women have not been in the spot- 
light of the political arena since 
Shirley Chisholm ran for the presi- 
dency in 1972. 

The difference between Chishobn 
and Ferraro lies in the fact that 
Chishohn was never considered a 



legitimate challenger. Whereas Fer- 
raro certainly is capable of becom- 
ing the first woman VP in U.S. 
history. 

The women of this nation must 
realize the potential political power 
that they wield. 

If you live in Clarion and are not 
registered to vote, the deadline is 
Oct. 9, 1984. Registration forms can 
be picked up at the county library, 
the post office or the state store. 
They must be postmarked by Oct. 9 
if you choose to use the mail-in 
forms. You can also register in per- 
son at the Clarion County 
Courthouse. 

Election day is Nov. 6, 1984. If you 
wish to register and vote, you must 
vote at the correct location. Uni- 
versity students must vote in Mar- 
wick-Boyd's main lobby. If you live 
in Clarion Borough between 5th and 
7th Avenues, you must vote at the 
Fireball on Wood Street. If you live 
between 5th Avenue and the football 
field, then you must vote in the base- 
ment of the courthouse. 



Campus debates to 
be field nationwide 



Aiming to help students cast a bet- 
ter informed vote on Nov. 6th, the 
National Student Campaign for 
Voter Registration (NSCVR) this 
week announced plans to organize 
simultaneous forums on the Presi- 
dential elections at over 100 
campuses on Oct. 21. 

The campus debates, collectively 
titled "Showdown '84", will be held 



ject, HumanSERVE, United States 
Pubnlic Interest Research Group 
(U.S. PIRG), United States Student 
Association, The Difference, Ameri- 
can Association of University Wo- 
men, Public Citizen, Democracy 
Project, Public Citizen. 

The National Student Campaign 
for Voter Registration is a non-par- 



tisan organization which conducts 
immediately before or after the na- voter registration and voter educa- 
tionally televised debate between tion campaigns across the country. 
Walter Mondale and Ronald Rea- students interested in organizing 
gan. The Presidential debate will "Showdown '84" debates at their 
also be aired on large screen tele- campus should contact NSCVR at 
visions during the events. 617-357-9016. 

"Students are strongly concerned 
about the issues, but are oft«i un- 
informed about the candidates' posi- ^^^m^^ ni cm vitd 
tions on those issues and the impli- xlVS^F UlbLUVfcn 
cations of those stands," observed £r^t^ OUK COUPLEKS 
Gary Kalman, a senior at Clark 
(MA) University and NSCVR chair- 



After slipping slightly last year, 
students' scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT) show modest 
increases this year, according to the 
College Board, which runs the na- 
tionwide SAT program. 

But educators' happiness about 
the improved test scores was quick- 
ly dampened by remarks by U.S. 
Secretary of Education Terrel Bell, 
who credited President Ronald Rea- 
gan's education policies for the good 
news. 

In a news conference called in 
Washington, D.C., the same time the 
0)llege Board was releasing the 
scores officially in New York, Bell 
told reporters "the gain in S.A.T. 
scores reflects the concern for ex- 
cellence in schools that is sweeping 
the nation," adding he was glad the 
recommendations made by a presi- 
dential commission on excellence 
"are being followed." 

Bell went on to imply Reagan's 
call for excellence in the nation's 
schools and his support for more 
stringent disciplinary policies, have 
helped SAT scores rise over the last 
four years. 

College Board and other education 
officials immediately complained 
Bell's press conference was, "a 
breach of etiquette" and "political," 
stressing that better teachers and 
schools — presidential pronounce- 
ments — helped improved SAT 
scores. 

Nearly one million high school 
seniors take the SAT each year. 
Colleges, of course, use the test 
results to help screen potential stu- 
dents. 

Nationwide scores on the math 
portion of the SAT increased three 
points this year, for an average 
score of 471, the College Board 
reports. 

Average scores on the verbal sec- 
tion of the test are up one point over 
last year, to 426. 

Although both scores remain far 
below the 1963 record highs of 502 for 
math and 478 for verbal, educators 
see them as hints that the long de- 






person. "These forums are designed 
to augment this campaign's per- 
sonality politics with substantive 
discussi(Hi of the issues." 

The campus debates will feature 
prominent individuals analyzing 
campaign issues such as the arms 
race, the economy, civil rights, the 
environment, women's issues, and 
education poUcy. 

Co-sponsors with NSCVR of the de- 
bate include Project Vote, Southwest 
voter Registration Education Pro- 



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If you're available from 
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Thursdays, 
the CLARION CALL needs your 
help with CIRCULATION 

Stop at the Call office In Harvey 
for details. 

*Comm. majors can earn co-curricular credit. 



cline in SAT scores finally has been 
reversed. 

SAT scores hit bottom in 1980, with 
an average math score of 466 and 
verbal score of 424. 

Bell's claim that Reagan's policies 
are responsible for the score in- 
creases is "simply impossible," 
says College Board spokesman Fred 
Moreno. 

"SAT scores are attributable not 
only to schools, but to books, tele- 
vision, and everything else a child is 
exposed to over 17 years," Moreno 
explains. 

Besides, Reagan's call for excel- 
lence last year "couldn't possibly 
have any effect" on student's test 
scores this year, he says. 

Because the SAT tests a wide 
array of aptitudes developed over a 
student's lifetime, there is virtually 
no way to improve scores in a year's 
time, he adds. 

This year's minor increases prob- 
ably are due to a combination of 
such things as accelerated curricula 
in elementary and junior high 
schools, better teachers and 
teaching methods, an increase in 
educational programming on tele- 
vision, and perhaps even the class- 
room computer invasion. College 
Board officials point out. 

Moreover, "the increase in math 
scores is largely attributable to (the 
improved performances of) 
women," says College Board Presi- 
dent George Hanford, while the in- 
crease in verbal score was largely 
among males. 

Math scores for female students 
increased four points this year, up 
from 445 last year, Moreno says. The 
average score for male students in- 
creased only two points. 

In contrast, the average verbal 
score for females held steady at 420, 



while the average score for males 
went up three points. 

Iowa students had the highest 
scores nationally, scoring a math 
average of 570 and verbal average of 
519. 

And for the second year in a row. 
South Carolina students have the 
dubious distinction of holding the 
lowest scores nationally: 419 for 
math and 384 for verbal skills. 

Other highlights from the 1984 SAT 
study: 

•Business continues to be the most 
popular major, with 19.1 percent of 
the test takers declaring it as their 
major. Health and medicine came in 
second, with 15.1 percent, followed 
by engineering with 12 percent, 
computer science with 9.7 percent, 
social sciences with 7.3 percent, and 
education with 4.6 percent. 

*While education remains the 
least popular major, the number of 
students planning to go into educa- 
tion rose from four to 4.6 percent. 
The average scores of declared ed 
majors also increased this year, by 
seven points on the math section and 
four points for verbal skills. 

•For the 10th straight year, more 
women — 52 percent — took the test 
than men. 

•Women made up the bulk of bus- 
iness majors, at 62 percent, com- 
pared to only 36 percent in 1973. 

•Interest in computer science 
waned for the first time in 10 years. 

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the sandwich? 

The Earl of Sandwich. The 
story IS that he put two pieces 
of bread around meat so he 
could eat while playing cards. 



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4— THE CLARION CALL, Ctarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 



Gymnastics coach resigns 




By Susan Ohler 



Gayle Trultt-Bean, gymnastics coach 
at Clarion since 1979, has retired from 
her position. Clarion Call file photo 



Gayle Truitt-Bean, the Women's 
Gymnastics team coach at Clarion 
University since 1979, is retiring as 
the Lady Eagles' coach, but will 
continue teaching here at Clarion 
with full-time faculty status. 

An assistant professor of Health 
and Physical Education, Truitt- 
Bean's retirement will become ef- 
fective as soon as another coach is 
placed under contract by the univer- 
sity. 

According to Truitt-Bean, "I've 
made this decision in what I feel is in 
the best interest of tlie gymnastics 
program at Clarion." 

Truitt-Bean now wishes to pursue 
other interests, such as family 
(Gayle and husband Terry are ex- 
pecting their first child around 
Thanksgiving), her doctorate de- 
gree in Higher Education Admin- 
istration/Athletic Administration 
and becoming more active in the 



university community. After receiv- 
ing her doctorate degree, she hopes 
to some day become an Athletic 
Department Dean or vice president. 

Clarion Athletic Director Frank 
Lignelli said of Truitt-Bean, "Gayle 
has given us five good years of 
coaching. She came in a difficult 
period of time and helped return 
Clarion's gymnastics program to a 
level of respectability . ' ' 

Under Gayle and Terry's super- 
vision, Clarion has become the most 
successful team in the conference, 
finishing first or second more times 
than any other team since the con- 
ference's inception. The team has 
included: nine state champions; two 
All-East Regional qualifiers; two 
gymnasts going to the NCAA Divi- 
sion I Nationals; two all- Americans, 
and one individual national cham- 
pion. 

A search for a gymnastics coach is 
continuing. It is hoped that a re- 
placement will be found by October 
15. 



WE CALL THE ATTENTION 




Home of the Golden Eagles 



of 5,500 students every 
week... 

to your business with 
creative inexpensive 
advertising... 

by reporting news and 
events clearly and 
soundly... 



■ ■ ■ 



just like a CLARION CALL 



(uj^ The Clarion Call 



Clarion University's only student newspaper 




Contact: 



Clarke Spence 
Advertising Sales Manager 
Harvey Hall, CUP 
226-2380 





Michael Short and Jan Balombiny of IRECO along with Clarion Chamber Director 
Joy Dunbar-Fueg extend a challenge to Clarion University students to enter the 
Autumn Leaf Festival Bed Races to be held prior to the parade on October 13. 

Photo courtesy of Clarion Chamber of Commerce 

Beds will race 
before festival parade 




A relatively young, but popular 
event, during Autumn Leaf Festival, 
is the bed race which precedes the 
parade. The third Annual Autumn 
Leaf Festival Bed Races will be held 
Saturday, Oct. 13 at 10:30 a.m. on 
Main Street and the Clarion Cham- 
ber of Commerce would like to get 
registration rolling. 

A $5 entry fee, a team of three, a 
sponsor and, of course, a bed, are all 
that are required to enter the Bed 
Race competition. Bed Race teams 
must be named, which can be a com- 
bination of the sponsor and team 
name. The bed itself cannot be smal- 
ler than 72 inches in length and 36 
inches in width; no steering mech- 
anism is permitted. 

Michael Short, Manager of Inter- 
national Sales for IRECO, gave birth 



to the idea of bed races three years 
ago and has chaired the competition 
ever since. Short returned from Rio 
de Janiero to see that, "The Bed 
Races will put the 'spectacular' in 
this year's Festival ! " (The 31st ALF 
theme is Autumn Art Spectacular.) 

Short has issued a challenge for 
the trophy to the people who par- 
ticipated in the Knox Bed Race. He 
also encourages Clarion University 
fraternities to try their hands at 
beds that roll. Short stresses safety 
and fun as two primary points of 
focus for the event. 

Bed inspection will begin at 9 a.m. 
on 2nd Avenue. The inspection sta- 
tion will be open until 10 a.m. The 
competition is limited to 20 teams 
and regi$tration forms areavailabil^ 
at the Clarion Chamber (rf Ccwn- 
merce, 517 Main Street, Clarion. 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984-5 



Reasons for college attendance are sound 



By Dr. G. Terry Madonna 
(APSCUF President) 

Last month all across the state 
suitcases and trunks were being 
packed in preparation for the ritual- 
istic return to our college campuses. 
Some 550,000 students enrolled this 
year in more than 200 Pennsylvania 
institutions, though not all reside 
permanently in the state. Unfortun- 
ately only about 40 percent of the 
June graduating high school seniors 
will receive any post-secondary edu- 
cation, a dismal record that also 
partially explains why the state's 
economic revitalization and recov-, 
ery will lag behind the rest of the 
nation and prove troublesome for 
many decades. 

There are important consequen- 
ces for each Pennsylvanian as well. 
One might legitimately ask: Why go 
to college? Will it get one a job? A 
good job? Will it make a difference 
in one's life? Is it worth the time and 
money? 

CAREER PREPARATION 

As much as anything else a college 
education helps young men and 



women discover the vocation best 
suited to their interests and talents. 
In addition, the university setting 
provides resources which assist 
them in obtaining the information 
and knowledge needed for success in 
their chosen field which also can 
have long-term effects. In one study 
of college graduates, a large number 
reported almost a decade later they 
were still using knowledge gained in 
college. More importantly, students 
learn how to think, hone their criti- 
cal abilities, organize their percep- 
tions, and grasp thematic consist- 
encies. What's more, the very act of 
going to college requires students to 
develop discipline and good working 
habits that will serve them well after 
they leave school and enter the 
world of work. 

GETTING A JOB 
Beyond imparting knowledge 
about a variety of subjects, college 
helps young people learn about the 
labor market — what the jobs are 
and where they are. And college 
graduates have a much better 
record of finding employment than 
those who don't attend — the 



demand for college graduates is 
three times greater than the demand 
for all workers. White collar occu- 
pations requiring a college educa- 
tion are expanding at a much faster 
rate than blue collar occupations not 
requiring a post-secondary degree. 
EARNING MORE 

The number of years of education 
is directly related to economic suc- 
cess. The greater the number of 
years of schooling completed, the 
greater the yearly income one may 
expect. College educated workers 
start at higher salaries than their 
non-college educated counterparts, 
and their income rises more sharply 
as their careers progress. One 
recent government study calculated 
that a college degree can add be- 
tween $300,000 and $400,000 to one's 
lifetime earnings. According to the 
U.S. Census Bureau, today's 18- 
year-old who receives a bachelor's 
degree can expect lifetime earnings 
almost 30 percent higher than one 
who does not. 

PERSONAL FULFILLMENT 

Perhaps equally important as the 
monetary return on investment for a 



college education are the non-quant- 
ifiable benefits which cannot be 
measured in mere dollars. The 
opportunity for self-discovery, the 
development of important social 
skills, the prospect for emotional 
growth — all are vital components of 
human fulfillment and happiness. 
The college environment provides 
the chance to stretch one's mind, to 
cultivate a more holistic perspective 
on life and achieve a high measure 
of self-satisfaction. 

On a more pragmatic level, the 
college educated person is likely to 
enjoy better health, worry less, have 
more job security, be a better con- 
sumer and a better citizen in 
general. 

Finally, people make decisions 
about their lives and their future 
almost daily. Yet no decision is more 
crucial than that of career choice. 
Those in the labor force spend a 
quarter of their lives at work. The 
average worker changes jobs every 
seven years. These two facts illus- 
trate why it's so important that 
young people adequately prepare 
themselves for satisfying and some- 



times diverse employment. The de^ 
mands of modern life mean that on 
the average a person will change 
careers from four to six times. To 
survive in our complicated society 
one needs to be flexible in seeking 
job opportunities. Equally import- 
ant is the requirement that job ap- 
plicants be employable. Simply put, 
a college education makes a person 
more employable, more adaptable 
to changing conditions in the econ- 
omy, and more satisfied with life. 



Library Hours 

Additional study hall hours have 
been added to the Carlson Library 
schedule this term. The library will 
be open on a study hall basis from 10 
p.m. to midnight Sunday through 
Thursday. The full schedule of hours 
is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m.- 
Midnight* 

Friday: 8a.m.-5p.m. 

Saturday: lla.m.-5p.m. 

Sunday: 2p.m.-Midnight* 

♦Study Hall Only 10 p.m -Midnight 
( Service points closed) 



Kelly to be grand marshall of ALF parade 




Jim Kelly, an East Brady native, 
"Rookie of the Year" and present 
Quarterback for the Houston Gamb- 
lers is slated as Grand Marshall of 
the ALF Parade on October 13, ac- 
cording to Festival Chairman Paul 
Weaver. 

Kelly has the distinction of holding 
many USFL records. He has passed 
for 5,219 yards to surpass the old 
record of Most Yards Passing in a 
Season, formerly held by Oakland's 
Fred Besana. He has thrown more 
touchdown passes in one season than 
any other quarterback in the USFL, 
with 44. In addition he is presently 
tied for the record number of touch- 
down passes in one game, as he 
threw five against Pittsburgh on 
May 12. 

Kelly also has the highest com- 
pletion percentage, .869. Presently 
he is the top rated passer in the 
USFL's Western Conference, and 
only trails Philadelphia's Chuck 
Fusina as the number one rated 
passer in the league. 



"Jim Kelly is the Rookie of the 
Century," says the New York Post, 
and the Clarion Autumn Leaf Com- 
mittee is very excited to have him as 
the Grand Marshall for the ALF 



Parade. 

Kelly's appearance in the ALF 
parade has been made possible by 
Jim Cumberland, Clarion County 
Sheriff. 



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Jim K«lly, of th« USFL's Houston Gamblers, will rids in the ALF parade on Oct. 

13. Photo courtesy of Clarion Chamber of Commerce 



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6-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday. Oct. 4, 1984 



Anderson backs Wachob Campaign 



State Rep. Bill Wachob held a joint 
press conference on Wednesday with 
the 1980 Presidential Candidate and 
former U.S. Representative, John B. 
Anderson. Speaking to a crowd of 
over 200 people in State College, on 
the Penn State campus, Rep. 
Wachob, a candidate for U.S. Con- 
gress in the 23rd District, said, "For 
20 years, John Anderson's constitu- 
ents in Illinois could say that they 
were represented by someone who 
made a difference. My highest aim 
in running for Congress is for people 
here in Central Pennsylvania to be 
able to say that their Congressman 
also makes a difference." Wachob 
continued, "John Anderson made a 
difference because he was independ- 
ent of special interests and of his 
party's leadership and because he 
had the courage to say and do what 
he thought was right." 

Rep. Wachob noted that the major 



issues of John Anderson's congres- 
sional career and presidential cam- 
paign are crucial in his own 
campaign, among them high unem- 
ployment and toxic pollution. Outlin- 
ing his proposals for addressing 
these issues, Wachob said, "More 
than 13 percent of the people who 
live in this District continue to be 
unemployed. I have proposed a com- 
prehensive program, including the 
creation of a National Development 
Bank that would create jobs and put 
people back to work through helping 
industries retool and become pro- 
ductive and competitive again." 

John Anderson focused his 
remarks on the environment, name- 
ly toxic contamination, and the 
economy and unemployment. He 
said that he had planned but was 
unable to visit Lock Haven, "the site 
of a toxic waste site where Rep. 
Wachob was able to get the state 



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EVERYDAY: $.85 MOLSONS $.90 HEINEKENS 

^Coming: "THE SPEAKEASY" 
THE UNIVERSITY INN 

340 MAIN STREET 
CLARION, PA. 

226-7200 



funds to provide for the health 
screening for employees exposed to 
noxious and poisonous substances on 
that site." 

Mr. Anderson was highly critical 
of Rep. Ginger's votes on the envir- 
onment. When asked about Rep. 
dinger's Public Works Committee 
vote to reduce the Superfund auth- 
orization and to exempt the oil indus- 
try from paying taxes, Anderson 
said, "It is totally incompatible with 
the best interest and needs of this 
district. No one, no one can justify a 
vote against putting more money 
into protecting the health of the 
American people." Anderson noted 
that of the 8,000 active toxic waste 
sites, only six have been cleaned up 
and only one percent have been 
screened and classified 

Mr. Anderson also addressed the 
problem of the economy. He said, 
"During the last three and one-half 
years, half of the reduction of the 
inflation rate was achieved through 
a recession that has still left 13 
percent of the population of this dis- 
trict unemployed, as Bill Wachob 
has just told you. When you get half 
of the inflation rate brought down 
because of a recession, that isn't 
anything to go to the American 
people and brag about." Anderson 
noted two other components in 
reducing the inflation rate: the 
flooding of imported products into 
our country which has caused the 
loss of American jobs, and which has 
brought about a dangerously high, 
$130 billion dollar deficit in our bal- 
ance of payments, and the farm 
crisis. Anderson said, "Farmers 
have been driven to the wall and, in 
the Midwest, 40 to 45 farms are going 
under the auctioneer's hammer ev- 
ery week." 



Q. WHAT DO Wendy's 

Mister Donut & 
McDonalds 
HAVE IN COMMON? 

A. They are all one block away from 

a FRIEND... 




The United 
Campus Ministry 

700 WOOD STREET 

BASEMENT OF PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

226-6402 




John Anderson, (left), who spokt rocontly in Clarton, ondorses congressional 
candidate Bill Wachob. 

Accounting symposium 
sclieduled for this month 



students and faculty members 
from over 20 colleges and univer- 
sities within the Ti-State area will 
meet with a panel of certified public 
accountants from the Pittsburgh 
area m conjunction with the 35th 
Annual Accounting Symposium 
sponsored by the Pittsburgh Chapter 
of the Pennsylvania Institute of Cer- 
tified Public Accountants. 

At this year's symposium, entitled 
"CPA - The future is Yours", the 
panelists will relate personal ex- 
periences of how the CPA profession 
has served as a stepping stone for 



opportunities within public ac- 
counting, industry and government. 
In addition to the panelists, there 
will be many CPAs who will be there 
to discuss professional opportuni- 
ties available to those seeking a 
career as a CPA. 

The Symposium will be held on 
Friday, Oct. 12. It will convene at 2 
p.m. in the Peter Mills Auditorium 
of Rockwell Hall at Duquesne Uni- 
versity. Anyone interested in attend- 
ing should contact Dr. Pineno's 
office, 334 StiU HaU, by Friday, Oct. 
5. 



DITZ'S 

(Next to Post Office) 

You will find many items at a discount 
of 50%-75%or moreatthe 
Sidewalk Sale Wed., Oct. 10 






Russian comedian to perform 
in Clarion during October 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984—7 




Yakov Smirnoff will perfonn in Clarion on 

Yakov Smirnoff, the only Russian 
comedian practicing in the United 
States, will perform at Clarion Uni- 
versity on Saturday, Oct. 13, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Marwick-Boyd Auditor- 
ium. 

Sponsored by the University Cen- 
ter Board, tickets are $3 for adults 
and $2 for Clarion University stu- 
dents. Tickets are available in ad- 
vance from the university ticket of- 
fice and will be sold at the door. 

Smirnoff starred with Robin Wil- 
liams in the movie "Moscow on the 
Hudson" and will appear with Rich- 
ard Pryor in the film "Brewsters 
Millions." 

Since his arrival in the United 
States seven years ago, he has com- 
piled an impressive list of creden- 
tials, including appearances in top 
comedy clubs throughout the United 



Oct. 13, at Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. 

Clarion Call file photo 

States, guest appearances on shows 
ranging from NBC's "Night Court" 
to "The Merv Griffin Show", and in- 
terviews in The Wall Street Journal, 
Playboy, and The Los Angeles 
Times. What is even more impres- 
sive is he spoke no EngUsh when he 
arrived in the States. 

Smirnoff began his comedy career 
at the age of 15 doing amateur shows 
in Russia. He worked his way up to 
entertaining guests on the cruise 
ships that sail the Black Sea. It was 
on these cruises that he experienced 
his first taste of the Western way of 
life. Eventually, Smirnoff and his 
family applied for visas to emigrate 
from the Soviet Union, and after re- 
ceiving them two years later, they 
were finally able to leave Russia in 
1977. "First they fire you from your 
job," Smirnoff remembers, "they 



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also interrogate you constantly. . . 
then they suddenly tell you that you 
have 10 days to get out, and limit you 
to two suitcases and $100 cash 
each." 

Still, the Smirnoffs made it to 
America, and today Yakov is one of 
the most popular rising comedians 
in the business. Predictably, much 
of his material deals with life in the 
Soviet Union. "Certainly that's what 
the American audience wants to 
hear. It's also what I want to say," 
Smirnoff declares. 

Teen pageant 
starts next week 

Twelve local girls will be com- 
peting for the honor of Miss Teen 
ALF on Monday, Oct. 8 and Tues- 
day, Oct. 9. The pageant will be 
held at the Clarion Area High School 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. Monday night 
is the preliminary competition and 
the crowning of Miss Teen ALF on 
Tuesday. 

Advance tickets are now available 
and can be purchased at the Cham- 
ber of Commerce office at 517 Main 
Street. The cost is $3 an evening or $5 
for both nights. A limited number of 
tickets will be available at the door. 



NEWS 

TIP? 

Call 2380 




Lt. Qov. William Scranton (second from right), presented the Clarion University 
Small Business Development Center with a Keystone Award of Merit from the 
Governor's PIrvate Sector Initiates Task Force during a visit to the Clarion cam- 
pus on Thursday. Also pictured are: Dr. Woodrow Yeaney, SB DC director; Dr. 
Marguerite VanLandlngham, dean of the college of business administration; Dr. 
Thomas A. Bond, president of Clarion University; Scranton, and U.S. Represent- 
ative William dinger. 

A ward applications available 

primarily in course work should not 

By Ken Ream applv 

The Environmental Publication 
Award is presented to graduate stu- 
dents who submit articles either 
published or accepted for publica- 
tion during the past year. The 
articles must have resulted from 
original graduate research and 
award recipients will be selected by 
NWF staff and outside reviewers 
with expertise in the subject matter. 

The deadline to apply for either 
program is November 30, 1984, and 
recipients will be notified in April of 
next year. Applications are avail- 
able by writing: Executive Vice 
President, Conservation Fellow- 
ship/Publication Award programs. 
National Wildlife Federation, 1412 
16th St., N.W., Washington, D.C. 

»• •••••• 



The National Wildlife Federation 
is now accepting applications for 
their Environmental Conservation 
Fellowship and Publication Award 
programs. 

Qualified graduate students can 
receive up to $4,000 from the Envir- 
onmental Conservation Fellowship 
and up to $2500 from the Publication 
Awards for the 1985-86 school year. 

The NWF Environmental Conser- 
vation Fellowships are awarded to 
graduate students in fields related to 
wildlife, natural resource man- 
agement, and protection of environ- 
mental quality. Applicants must be 
principally engaged in research, 
rather than course work. First year 
graduate students engaged 



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8-THE CLARION CALL, ClariDn, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 



Study shows computers confuse freshmen 



Most college freshmen are sunwis- 
ed, confused and frustrated during 
their first year of computer courses, 
according to a newly-released study. 

The computer anxiety afflicts in- 
coming students in all majors, but 
may be particularly severe among 
liberal arts majors, observers add. 

Over 80 percent of all incoming 
freshmen are "surprised" by the sub- 
ject matter covered in computer 
courses, the survey reveals. 

Moreover, one of every two fresh- 
men are "confused" by computer 
coursework, while nearly 70 percent 
say the courses actually make them 
"frustrated" and "angry." 

"When freshmen go away to col- 
lege they have a lot of new exper- 
iences. But the computer science 
courses turn out to be much different 
than any of the new students expect- 
ed," says Lee Sproull, researcher at 
Carnegie Mellon . University, who 



has surveyed CMU freshmen over 
the last three years to assess their 
attitudes toward computer courses 
there. 

Among other things, Sproull says 
entering students find computer 
courses "more surprising, more con- 
fusing and harder to get a handle on" 
than their other courses. 

And such confusion over computers 
"is true of liberal arts as well as 
technical students," she adds. 

One of the reasons for the so-called 
computer anxiety, Sproull says, is 
that students are often "thrust into 
the computer culture" before they 
learn how computers work and un- 
derstand the special language used in 
computer courses. 

Like at many schools, "computing 
at CMU is not simply a question of 
learning about computers in a class- 
room setting. Computing is a part of 
the whole work life at a campus," 



l^roull notes. 

With more traditional subjects like 
history, math, or physics, she says, 
students learn in a sheltered, aca- 
demic environment, and ease their 
way into the subjects as their ability 
and understanding increases. 

But the "hands-on" experience in 
computer classes catapaults students 
directly into the real-life world of 
computing, frequently without any 
[N*ior exposure to the subject or the 
machines. 

Thus, "students who are new to 
computing end up using the campus 
mainframe right beside advanced us- 
ers, which often makes the newcom- 
ers feel intimidated and even more 
confused," she says. 

"That's a natural reaction for just 
about anyone who has to use comput- 
ers in the presence of experienced 



users," agrees Mark Tucker, direc- 
tor of the Project on Information 
Technology and Education in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

"And the confusion and intimida- 
tion cycle repeats itself each time you 
use a different computer or a new 
piece of software," he adds, "which 
makes it a lot different from learning 
other college subjects." 

To ease students' entry into the 
caaipaw c o napw te r o w ltur e , 
researchers Sproidl suggests colleges 
offer computer orientation courses so 
students will learn the basic rules and 
lingo before taking a computer 
course. 

In addition, coUeges need to "make 
their terminal rooms less aversive," 
she says. 

"Many of the students we surveyed 
said the computer rooms reminded 



Credit/ no record fails 




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Data processing can 
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The Computer Center 

SOQrCenter Mall 

Call 226-5350 for Classes & Tutoring 

"Get in step with the real world" 



Credit/no record grading systems 
have failed, and students who have a 
chance to use them generally reject 
them, according to a survey of over 
1600 colleges using the credit/no 
record system. 

Dr. C. James Quann, r^istar at 
Washington State University and 
author of the survey, says stud^ts do 
worse when they're giv«i credit/no 
record grades instead of letter 
grades. 

"Many institutions are beginning to 
realize students perform on a lower 
level with credit/no record systems," 
he says. "Students come to class late, 
skip classes, don't do assignments 
and hold other students back. Per- 
formance is below par in many 
cases." 

Quann sees the system as a vestige 
of schools that initiated credit/no re- 
cord options abandoned them alto- 
gether on the theory that, "if you 
give the students something, it hurts 
to take it away," Quann adds. 

Northwest Missouri State Univer- 
sity, for example, changed its 
credit/no record system in 1979, 



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letting students use it in a maximum 
of nine credit hours. 

"It's not overused anymore," 
reports Registrar Linda Girard. 
"People were taking advantage of it: 
using it for hard major classes and 
GED requirements. Faculty is much 
happier now." 

Quann's own Washington State still 
offers credit/no record options, but 
only seven percent of the student 
body uses it. 

Some schools, of course, remain 
devotees of the system. 

"Faculty instituted this system to 
encourage learning for the sake of 
learning, instead of a competitive 
environment," reports Nancy 
Pascal, associate registrar at the 
University of California-Santa Cruz. 

"Students like this environment 
and the freedom to test things more 
than under a traditional system," she 
claims. "Faculty is committed (to it) 
despite the enormous task of written 
evaluations." 

Quann believes more schools are 
moving away from credit/no record 
systems, however, if only because 
grading fashions change from time to 
time. 

Credit/no record systems were 
common in the 19th Century, until 
they were supplanted by numerical 
grading practices, he e}q>lains. Sym- 
bols and letters later appeared to 
summarize numerical groupings. 



them of a scene out of '1964' because 
ttiey were so cold and sterile. Com- 
ixiter rooms should be more warm 
and inviting," Sproull adds. 

Fortunately, the computer anxiety 
many freshmen experience de- 
creases as they become more famil- 
iar with the subject, Sproull notes. 

"Some students become very ex- 
hilarated by their new-found 
knowledge and say 'Wow, I never 
knew this could be so fun'." 

On the other hand, those who never 
quite overcome the confusion and 
frustration "end up doing just enough 
to get by," while stUl others give up 
on the subject altogether, she says. 

Classified 

The Word of Life Pentecostal Fel- 
lowship group meets Fridays at 6 
p.m. in the Campbell Hall base- 
ment. 

MUSIC MASTER can fulfUI all of 
your musical needs. All occasions 
from parties to dances, just name 
it, and we'll play it. Various mu- 
sic and requests are backed by a 
professional sound system and a 
superior light show guaranteed to 
make any occasion special. Call 
226-3163. 

FOR SALE: Records by various art- 
ists mid thru late 70's in mint 
condition. Also a Sharp RT 100, 
$50, and a Sony TC-127, $40 cas- 
settes discs. Call Kevin at 226- 
3163. 

HELP WANTED: Looking to earn 
extra cash this semester? Be- 
come our college Travel Repre- 
saitative. Enthusiasm to travel a 
must. Excellent business/mar- 
keting majors. Call Bruce at 1-800- 
431-3124 or 1-914-434-6000 (N.Y. 
State only) 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,553/ 
year. Now hiring. For directory 
call 805-687-6000 Ext. R-6334. 

Rummage Sale Friday, Oct. 5 at 9 
a.m. in Ross Memorial Auditor- 
ium^ 

Reagan '84 

"He who believes in the Son has eter- 
nal life; He who does not obey the 
Son shall not see life, but the wrath 
of God rests upon him." John 3: 36. 




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In troducing 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984—9 



By Susan Boll 



Hal Wassink is probably the most 
well-known guy on campus. After 
all, he is the coordinator of Student 
Activities. This position enables 
him to come into contact with many 
student organizations. He has been 
at Garion since 1973 after being on 
the staff of Bowling Green Univer- 
sity and acting as Dean of Students 
at Dlinois Wesleyn. 

Some of the things that student ac- 
tivities provide for the various or- 
ganizations on campus are: ditto 
copying, popcorn machine rental, 
posters, and a mail service. In addi- 



tion to this, student activities is re- 
sponsible for Parents Day, Activi- 
ties Day, the campus movies and 
CAB. 

According to Wassink, "On Par- 
ents Day, this year, 200 parents and 
friends attended the welcoming cer- 
emony and two to three times that 
number attended the football game 
and the other activities. As for Ac- 
tivities Day, I was just the coordina- 
tor of that. There were 48 groups 
that had exhibits set up. Center 
Board sponsored the jazz band, and 
Jerry and Terry, while Panhel and 
the Inter Fraternity Council (IFC) 
sponsored the evening movie." 



Lazich performs for Pittsburgfi 



By Shari McClory 



Milutin Lazich is best known to 
Clarion as Tevye, the Yugoslavian 
father in Fiddler on the Roof but 
recently became known to Pitts- 
burgh opera lovers as the Consul of 
Milan. Mr. Lazich, who is Director 
of Choirs and an Associate Professor 
of Voice at Clarion, made his first 
debut with the Pittsburgh Opera on 
Sept. 20 and 22. 

Through a friend, Mr. Lazich man- 
aged to schedule an audition with the 
famous director of the opera, Tito 
Capobianco. Mr. Lazich felt he had 
performed well during his audition 
and said he was, "up for it." Within 
one week, he was notified of his role 
as one of nine principal artists in the 
rousing Italian opera, "La Battaglia 
di Legnano," which means the battle 
of L^nano. The large production 
was a revival of the Italian opera by 
Giuseppe Verdi and the premiere 
work on an American state. 

Many major city newspaper crit- 
ics, including The New York Times, 
were there to see the show. Mr. 
Lazich felt it was thrilling to be able 
to work on such a high professional 
level of theatre with such talented 
people as he did. "This does open the 
door for me for bigger and better 
leading roles," he acknowledged. 
Along with being such a successful 
opera it featured the new system of 
C^Tras; the projection of English 
translation above the proscenium of 
the Italian words being sung. 

The opera was aired on WQED 
Public Broadcasting in the Pitts- 
burgh area. 



Mr. Lazich rehearsed for the per- 
formance for almost five months 
with his accompanist, Annette Pesh. 
He had to be available for rehearsal 
16 days before the opening show. 
Although he had to commute back 
and forth to Pittsburgh to Heinz 
Hall, he missed only a few days of 
teaching. 

Milutin Lazich, who was born in 
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, immigrated 
to the United States when he was 12 
years old. He graduated from In- 
diana University in Bloomington, 
Indiana, with a masters degree in 
both Music Education as well as 
Vocal Pedagory. 

Mr. Lazich is a performer in the 
U.S., not to mention other foreign 
countries. He is featured frequently 
as a guest soloist with the Clarion 
University Symphony Orchestra. In 
1^, he was the bass soloist in the 
Pennsylvania Collegiate Choral Fes- 
tival. He was also a winner in the 
New York MetropoHtan Opera Audi- 
tions held in Pittsburgh some years 
ago. On the operatic stage, he most 
recently appeared as guest artist 
with the Natonal Opera of Belgrade, 
singing the roles of Ramfis in Aida 
and Philip in Don Garlos and was a 
Basso-Cantante soloist in the Opera 
Festival Barga in Italy. 

When remarking on his first ex- 
perience with the Pittsburgh Opera, 
Lazich said, "Taking the bows, I 
thought, here I am - from the cul- 
turally limited area of Clarion and 
getting applause from the Pitts- 
burgh audiences. Just being exposed 
to the Pittsburgh area theatre was a 
great thrill." 



As if those responsibilities weren't 
enough, Wassink is also a voting 
member of Center Board and is in- 
volved with homecoming. 

On the subject of Homecoming, 
Wassink had this to say, "I act as the 
liaison person between the univer- 
sity and the Clarion Chamber of 
Commerce. If the Chamber of Com- 
merce needs information about 
homecoming, then I am the person 
they contact." 

To Wassink, homecoming is more 
than a football game. "Most people 
don't realize certain things that go 
into the preparation of homecom- 
ing. For instance, I reserve the park- 
ing lots at Wilkinson and Nair for the 
organization of the parade and the 
floats. I also see to it that the band 
and marching units from the various 
high schools have a place to stay 
before the parade. The facilities 
such as bathrooms and a concession 
stand for these units are found in 
Tippin Gym." 

Because of the wide variety of 
events that student activities offer, 
no longer does one have to sit in his 
or her dorm room wondering, "What 
can I do?" 




Milutin Lazich, Ciarion's Director of 
Choirs and Associate Professor of 
Voice. Clarion Call file photo 

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-can you have mutual friends. 

-are there shack monsters. 

-can one have mon amis avec 
sauce. 

-do or does dings' give you cour- 
age. 

-can one confuse the Holiday Inn 
with Zack's. 
-are there real S-L's. 



I 



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OCT. 4-14 

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12 -5 p.m. Sun. 

226-6272 




10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 




Anderson speaks of 
party for the people 



John Anderson, candidate of National Unity Party. 



Photo by Blain Miller 



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By Paul Tripo ney 

"The survival of representative 
government depends upon the 
responsiveness and integrity of the 
political process, and America's two 
political parties do not effectively 
manage the present and fail to plan 
for the future." These principles 
serve as the backbone of The 
National Unity Party, a party 
designed for those Americans who 
are dissatisfied with our country's 
traditional two parties. Last Monday 
night in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium, 
the fonder and chairman of the 
National Unity Party, John B. An- 
derson, shared with a large and 
intent audience his prescription for 
reforming the American political 
system. 

Anderson, a former Republican 
congressman and unsuccessful can- 
didate for the Republican presiden- 
tial nomination in 1980, fairly cap- 
tivated his audience in his markedly 
candid speaking style. He explained 
that Americans have grown apathe- 
tic and cynical about their govern- 
ment because the old parties have 
overpromised for the sole purpose of 
winning elections, and that many of 
today's voters are choosing "the 
lesser of two evils" during elections. 
"We don't have a coherent national 
philosophy in today's government," 
he said, and went on to explain that 
we are not getting as broad a debate 
as we should on today's important is- 
sues. He said Americans are "fear- 
ful that the national government is 
unwilling to respond to issues that 
directly affect th eir personal lives," 
and described th is inability and un- 
willingness to respons as a "syste- 







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NOW YOU ASK WHO WE ARE? 

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mic failure," a flaw in the nature of 
the political system itself. With 
these as his basis, he said "the time 
had come to organize a new political 
party." 

The Republican party, claimed 
Anderson, advocates government 
for the rich and by the rich, while 
Democrats have let organized labor 
"dictate to them policies which ig- 
nore the need for solutions develop- 
ed jointly by labor, management 
and government." Unlike either of 
these parties, Anderson said the 
National Unity Party is committed 
to building a party of the people, not 
just special interests. Among some 
of the party's principles is a belief in 
the need to end the arms race, and in 
support of a nuclear freeze. Ander- 
son was obviously adamant in his 
personal support of the freeze. When 
asked of his opinion toward reducing 
existing arms, he flatly stated, "You 
never will reduce until you first 
stop." The party also advocates the 
elimination of discrimination in 
every aspect of life, and a committ- 
ment to human rights, here and 
abroad. Anderson explained his 
belief in an "accessible, compas- 
sionate party, responsive to the 
needs of the disadvantaged. . .and 
for equal access to quality educa- 
tion." To this end, he described col- 
lege aged people as the backbone of 
the party if it is to grow substantially 
in the future. 

Of the major issues facing Amer- 
ica today, Mr. Anderson addressed 
mainly that of the national deficit. In 
his opinion, the best way to reduce 
the debt is to cut defense spending 
substantially. He also said that 
waste in government was incredible, 
and that a more thoughtful, efficient 
purchasing plan was important in 
deficit reduction. "We didn't have to 
be told about the $7600 coffee pot that 
only makes 10 cuts when it works," 
he said. He also felt that it was nec- 
essary to look into the acquisition of 



some additional revenue, probably 
requiring an increase in taxes. He 
summed up by saying, "If we don't 
deal with the deficit now, interest 
rates and mortgage rates will rise 
enough in the next few years to put 
us in a worse economic position than 
we are experiencing now." 

Anderson feels that Democrats 
and Republicans are more interest- 
ed in their own power than in what is 
good for the nation. He said, "We 
need a leader who isn't intent in 
thinking of another four years, but 
rather one who focuses on getting his 
job done consistently." He assured 
the audience that his opinions were 
not "self-serving, because the party 
had no candidate in this year's pres- 
idential election." 

Recent opinion polls are suggest- 
ing that conditions are ripe for the 
insurgence of a third major political 
party. Anderson said that nearly 
four in 10 Americans liked the idea. 
That translates into about 60 million 
people of voting age. But first, the 
traditional two-party mechanism 
must give way. Anderson believes, 
however, that in time, even hallowed 
traditions can be abandoned and he 
sees our two parties working well for 
politicians, but not for the public. 
"It's this type of climate," he be- 
lieves, "in which a new party could 
thrive." 




Columbus Day • Oct. 8 



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149 MADISON STREET, CLARION, PA 16214 
PHONE 226-4833 



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Mon.-Sat. 

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• Beginning October 15th. .. . 
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are available for student housing 

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• $175 per month 

THE UNIVERSITY INN 

340 MAIN STREET 
CLARION 
226-7200 



Eagle's Den soars high with service 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984-11 



By Kathy LeMunyon 



Take One. The time is 11:00 on a 
Saturday night, and this is the place 
to be. Red checkered tablecloths 
cover the many tables, and candles 
light the way for the nearly 500 
people who have decided to be here 
tonight. Men and women sip drinks 
with such names as Virgin Mary, 
Tequilaless Sunrise and Orange 
Juice and Soda, and the dance floor 
is crowded with bodies dancing to 
the sounds of Billy Idol, U2, and 
Chicago. 

Take Two. The same place, the 
next day. Students nibble on such de- 
lights as soft pretzels, cheese sticks, 
and french fried mushrooms, as 
well as such standard college fare 
as subs, burgers, and pizza. Service 
is provided entirely by CUP 
students. It's a relaxed, comfortable 
atmosphere, a place where students 
can socialize or study. 

These are two facets of the Eagle's 
Den, located in the bottom floor of 
Riemer Center. This year, the 
Eagle's Den enters its third semes- 
ter of student management. This 
means that the entire operation of 
the restaurant, from purchasing to 
payroll is conducted by three 
student managers: Tim Gerkin, Don 
Powell and Steve Mole, and their 
staff. The managers meet once a 
week with Dave Tomeo, the Director 
of University Centers, but excluding 
that the entire operation is in their 
hands. 

This change from the 1982-83 
school year was Tomeo's idea. 
After the old management decided 
to give up the Den, Tomeo journeyed 
to Gettysburg College to investigate 
the student management of their 
student center. Tomeo liked what he 
saw, and in fall of 1983, the Eagle's 
Den became a totaly student-run 
organization. The endeavor has paid 
off; in 1983-84 gross sales rose 
$28,000 from the previous year to a 
total of $78,000. 

The Eagle's Den features a wide 
variety of foods. As a matter of fact, 
anything that can be bought in town 
can be bought at a lower price at the 
Den. Breakfast, for instance, is $1; a 
mound of french fries is 55 cents; 
subs are $1.75, and a 16-inch 
TORPIT (pizza) is $4.50, and these 
prices are every day of the week. 
There are quarter-pound burgers for 
90 cents, cheese sticks for 95 cents 
and ice cream cones for less than 
half a dollar. And if that's not 
enough to tickle your fancy, there 
are Daily Specials - an entree, side 
dish, and medium drink - all for un- 
der $2. 

Next week marks the entrance of a 
new entree, the WOODA. TTiat trans- 
lates to a double hamburger, double 
cheeseburger, or double bacon 
cheeseburger, "Which Others Only 
Dream About," according to the new 
slogan. The management hopes that 
the WOODA will join the hambur- 
gers, cheeseburgers, and chicken 
sandwiches as the most popular 



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items sold at the Den. 

The Eagle's Den got its title in 
1982, when the name was chosen by 
Center Board members as the win- 
ning entry in a contest to rename the 
restaurant. Before the completion 
and subsequent name change, the 
restaurant had been known simply 
as the Riemer Center Snack Bar, 
since the construction of the building 
in 1972. With the dawn of student 
management, the Eagle's Den 
became one of the largest student 
employers on campus, with a total of 
23 employees, all of whom are paid. 
The regular workers average 10 
hours per week, with the manage- 
ment staff putting in between 15 to 
25. 

There are a number of future 
events coming to the Den, including 
a design contest for the moveable 
wall that separates the restaurant 
from the other downstairs areas at 
Riemer. In addition, there are sev- 
eral coming attractions to CAB 



nights, including dance contests, 
giveaways, TORPIT nights and, 
hopefully, videos. 

The Den will be accepting appli- 
cations for student workers in No- 
vember, and management applica- 
tions will be available after Home- 
coming. The selection process is 
comparable to that of any other job, 
and involves at least one interview 
with the present managers. 

The managers note they are more 
interested in serving the public than 
in turning a proflt, a claim that no 
other restaurant in this area 
makes. This philosophy is behind the 
low prices and generous servings. 

The Eagle's Den is open Monday 
to Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 
p.m.; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 1 
a.m.; Saturday from 1 to 1, and 
Sunday from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. 
Breakfast hours are from 7:30 a.m. 
to 10 a.m., and the regular menu is 
served at all other times. 




The Eagle's Den, located in the bottom floor of Riemer Center, is a place where 
students can relax, socialize or study in a comfortable atmosphere. 

Photo by Jeff Newptier 



A student bites a teacher. 

The school psychologist goes berserk. 

The substitute teacher is a certified lunatic. 

And students graduate who can't read or write. 

It's Monday morning at JFK High. 




TEACHERS 



United Artists Proenu 

An AARON RUSSO Productioii 

An ARTHUR MILLER Film 

sumng NICK NOLTE • JOBETH WILLIAMS • JUDD HIRSCH • RALPH MACCHIO 
TEACHERS" ALLEN GARFIELD w.h LEE GRANT ^ RICHARD MULLIGAN 

WrittnibyW.R.McKlNNEY Production Designed by RICHARD MacDONALD DirectorofPhoiognphy DAVID M. WALSH 
HK^E^eT Executive Producer IRWIN RUSSO Produced by AARON RUSSO Directed By ARTHUR HILLER 



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STARTS OCTOBER 5th AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE 



12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 



Rape Crisis Center expands services 



By Gino Benza 

The Clarion County Rape Crisis 
Center is expanding its outreach to 
Jefferson County. Since July 1, 1984, 
the center has counseled 21 new 
victims of a sexual assault. T his 
latest statistic emphasizes the need 
for rape crisis intervention in the 
two counties. 

Ms. Bridgit Dolecki, president of 
the Rape Crisis Center, outlines the 
procedure a victim of sexual assault 
should follow. 

First, and foremost, the victim 
should go to the hospital. The physi- 
cal well-being of the person is criti- 
cal. Stitches may have to be given, 
or a concussion may have to be 
treated. 

At the hospital, a pelvic exam will 
be administered. The results of this 
exam could provide important evi- 
dence should the rape victim want to 
prosecute. Nothing can kill a case 
faster than the lack of evidence. 

The hospital will also give a test 
for, and, if necessary, treat for V.D. 

The victim is advised not to 
shower or change clothes l)efore 
going to the hospital. Understand- 
ably, this is quite difficult to keep in 



mind after such a traumatic inci- 
dent. Again the evidence collected 
will help the case in court. 

If the rape occurred at home, the 
center will provide shelter for the 
person until they feel comfortable 
enough to return home. 

Although every case is different, 
the average length of time that a 
victim is in counselling will be from 
about six months to one year. As far 
as long term coping goes, the na- 
tional average is five years. 

After a rape or a sexual assault, a 
victim typically goes th rough three 
stages. 

There is no such thing as the 
"Typical Victim", and these stages 
do vary. The first is usually denial. 
This stage is characterized by night- 
mares, loss of appetite, and a fear of 
the dark or crowds. Commonly there 
is a lot of self blame and guilt at this 
stage. 

The denial stage will be replaced 
by feelings of anger and frustration. 
Questions like "How could anyone 
do this to me," are frequently asked. 

Finally, the last stage is accept- 
ance. It is now that the victim real- 
izes it's time to get on with their life. 
Acceptance does not mean repres- 



sion. Certain colors or odors could 
easily remind the victim of the at- 
tacker. 

It's important for friends to 
realize that rape is the loss of some- 
thing, "It is the loss of control; 
something lost they didn't want to 
give," says Ms. Dolecki. 

One of the cruelest things to say to 
a rape victim is that it is no big deal. 
Even if the rape happened years ago 
the person requires special care. 

The Rape Crisis Center involves, 
what they call "Significant others", 
in the healing process. 

Parents are often more affected 
with feelings of guilt than the victim 
might be. 

Reactions of friends are extreme- 
ly important. An attitude of wanting 
revenge on the person by a loved 
one, while very real, is not what the 
victim immediately needs. 

Darryl Duerr works with the 
center in a Public Relations capac- 
ity. His main goal is to educate the 
public about the myths and realities 
of rape. He stresses that it is not the 
morality of the victim that is in 
question, which, unfortunately is 
often the case once it is taken to 
trial. Often a rape plea will be 





CLARION 

40 S. SIXTH AVENUE 



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MEATBALL 1.60 

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brought down to assault in order to 
get a conviction. 

"Everyone is guilty of putting 
themselves in bad situations," says 
Ms. Dolecki. She advises to always 
be aware of your surroundings. 

Another hint is to vary your route. 
Many rapes are planned. Walk with 
confidence, and in numbers. 

Be aware that if you use a weapon 
it might be used against you by the 
assailant. Self defense might seem 
like the ideal way of getting out of a 
bad situation, but most rapists are 
repeat offenders and they know 
most of the tricks. 



Many victims are able to talk their 
way out of it by turning the attacker 
off, or even yelling "Fire". 

The counselors at the Rape Crisis 
Center are required to have 32 hours 
of classroom instruction, and eight 
hours of actual counselling for their 
certification. 

The center's business phone num- 
ber is 226^502. The emergency num- 
ber is 226-7273 (RAPE). There is 
staff on duty seven days a week, 24 
hours a day. 

Rape is the most violent crime 
that can happen to a person, it 
leaves them alive to remember. 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, OCT. 4 , ^.. „ j ^ t . 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Scrambled Eggs, Corn Muffins, Fried Potatoes, Chilled Grapefruit 
Sections, Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Caramel Buns. „..,», r c ^ 

LUNCH: Homemade Corn Chowder, Beef Rice Soup, Beef BBQ on Soft Bun, Hot Meatloaf Sand- 
wich. Tater Tots. , „ ,^,..^.1.1 
DINNER: Homemade Corn Chowder, Beef Rice Soup, Grilled Hamburg Steak, Fried Chicken, 
Corn, Potatoes, Cabbage. 

FRIDAY, OCT. 5 . ^„ ^ ^ 

BREAKFAST: Cheese Omelette, Grilled Bacon, Bagels, Cream of Wheat, Fried Potatoes, French 
Toast w/Hot Syrup, Sausage Patty, Cinnamon Nut Cake. .. . „ „ 

LUNCH: Chili Soup, French Onion Soup, Fried Fish Sandwich on Roll, Italian Meat Balls on a 
Bun, Corn Curls, Carrots w/Celery. 

DINNER: Chili Soup, French Onion Soup, Baked Haddock, Quarter Pound Beef Frank, Spinach, 
Escallooed Potatoes. Sauerkraut. 
S.ATURDAY, OCT. 6 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Orange Quarters, Fried Eggs, Hot Cakes w/Syrup, Cream of Wheat, Fried 
Potatoes, Chilled Pear Halves, Cherry Danish. 

lUNCH: Oyster Stew w/Cheese Sauce, Lima Bean Soup, Fried Shaved Ham on Roll, Pizza 
w/Pepperoni,Fritos, Creamed Peas and Potatoes. 

DINNER: Oyster Stew w/Cheese Sauce, Lima Bean Soup. Deviled Eggs, Beef Turnovers w/Beef 
Gravy, Four Wings, Cauliflower, Ranch Fries, Green Beans. 

SUNDAY, OCT. 7 ,, ^ ^ .. „ 

BRUNCH: Cantaloupe Wedge, Chilled Grapefruit Half, Hot Cakes w/Syrup, Bacon, Corn Muffins, 
Hot Meat Loaf Sandwich, w/Brown Gravy, Hash Brown Potatoes, Hot Sticky Buns, Bagels 
w/Cream Cheese, Diced Peaches, Scrambled Eggs, Sausage Links. . ,„ , 

DINNER: Lima Bean Soup, Homemade Cream of Potato Soup, Roast Steamship Round of Beef 
AuJus, Carved to Order, Breaded Veal Cutlet, Tomato Wedges, Scalloped Potatoes, Brussel 
Sprouts. 

MONDAY, OCT. 8 ^ , „,^ . , „ o n i.- u 

BREAKFAST: Chilled Pineapple Tidbits, Cheese Omelette, Cream of Wheat, Jelly Roll, fresh 
Banana, Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Coffee Crumb Cake, Fried Potatoes. 

LUNCH: Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup, Cream of Mushroom Soup, Cheeseburger on Roll 
(Sliced Cheese w/Sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Uttuce) Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich, 
PotatoChips, Navy Beans. . ™ . , c. u>i. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup, Cream of Mushroom Soup, Baked Chicken Eighth, 
Spaghetti w/Meat Balls, Corn, Lyonnaise Potatoes, Spinach. 

TUESDAY, OCT. 9 . ,, j ,. . . i. u 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Rice, Banana Bread, fried Potatoes, French 
Toast w/Hot Syrup, Patty of Sausage, Blueberry Muffins. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Soup w/Fine Noodles, Cream of Carrot Soup, Tacos, Chicken Pot 
Pie, Corn Curls, Lettuce. ,, „ .„ . „ o. i 

DINNER: Homemade Chicken Soup w/Fine Noodles, Cream of Carrot Soup, Grilled Ham Steak, 
Baked Meat Loaf w/Mushroom Gravy, Mixed Vegetables, Potatoes, Broccoli. 

WEDNESDAY. OCT. 10 r. ...... ^ . , 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Cherry Danish, Hot Oatmeal, 

Fried Potatoes, Mixed Citrus Sections, Waffles w/Hot Syrup, Coffee Cake. 

LUNCH: Homemade Lima Bean and Bacon Soup, Beef Rice Soup. Hot Italian Sausage on a Roll, 

FriedFishFillet, Macaroni & Cheese, Zucchini. 

DINNER: Homemade Lima Bean and Bacon Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Roast Tom Turkey w/Sage 

Dressing, Breaded Porkette, Peas, Potatoes w/Gravy, Beets. 



THIS SATURDAY, OCT. 6 



's 



wnD O Presents 
Another Exciting Dance 

featuring 
Candlelight Dancing 

and non-alcohol mixed drinl^s 

Sponsored by the I. F. C. 



CAB'S continues 

to provide the 

excitement on 

campus. 

Get there early 

to beat the 

crowd! 




■I 



Dance from: 9 p.m. til 12:30 a.m. 



McFarland's/Skoal Bandits 



"Pick The Winner 



f f 



_Texas 
_Ohio State 
.Washington 
_Brigham Young 
^Florida State 
.Oklahoma State 
_N.C. State 
.Maryland 
_E. Carolina 
_Clarion 
.Denver 
.Miami 
.Minnesota 
_New England 
_New Orleans 
_N.Y. Jets 
_Philadelphia 
_St. Louis 
^Washington 
_Atlanta 
_San Diego 
_Seattle 



.San Francisco 



at Rice 
at Purdue 
at Oregon State 
at Colorado State 
at Memphis State 
at Nebraska 
at Georgia Tech 
at Penn State 
at Pittsburgh 
at Slippery Rock 
at Detroit 
at Pittsburgh 
at Tampa 
at Cleveland 
at Chicago 
at Kansas City 
at Buffalo 
at Dallas 
at Indianapolis 
atL.A. Rams 
at Green Bay 
at L.A. Raiders 
TIEBREAKER 

at N.Y. Giants 



Predict the winner and final score 



CONTEST RULES 

1 ) All entries must be received in the of Hce of the Clarion Call on the Friday following publication 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently enrolled at Clarion University or be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimilies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie. the entrant picking the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involving the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be final. 



NAME 



ADDRESS. 



PHONE NUMBER. 



Harriers trample 
St. Bonny, 2-1 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984-13 



By David Pound 



The men's cross country team de- 
feated St. Bona venture University 
15-49 on Wednesday. It was the 
second dual meet this year for the 
Golden Eagles, bringing their rec- 
ord to 1-1. 

Senior, co-captain Scott DeLaney 
finished first with a time of 27:13 in 
the five mile run. Finishing out the 
top five positions for Clarion were: 
Greg Garstecki, second; Doug 
McConnell, third; Pelligrino Cica- 
rello, fourth, and Chris Kern, fifth. 
Coach Bill English was very pleased 
with the total team effort and the 
way the team stayed grouped to- 
gether. 

On Saturday the Golden Eagles 
were defeated by Shippensburg Uni- 
versity 15-49. The Red Raiders 
overpowered Clarion with a strong 
group of runners featuring five 
seniors. 

Steve Spence of Shippensburg, 
candidate for the National Cham- 
pionship in Division II, finished first. 
Leading the pack for Clarion was 
Scott DeLaney with a time of 26:48. 
Finishing behind DeLaney was 
senior, co-captain Bob Smith, also 
Jim Snyder and Greg Garstecki. 
Senior Jay Rogers, in his first out- 
ing, finished a respectable 17th 

Even though the Golden Eagles 
were defeated, their individual 
times were faster than their times at 
their win at St. Bonaventure. Coach 
English stated that they were just 
overpowered by a strong group of 
experienced runners. With the lack 
of a front runner so far this season, 
he is expecting the team to tighten 
up as the season progresses. 

On Saturday the team travels to 
Gannon where Gannon, Slippery 
Rock, Mercyhurst and Qarion will 
be competing. 



Football contest 
reintroduced 

The sports section of the Clarion 
Call announces the return of "Pick 
the Winners" contest. 

The contest is co-sponsored by 
McFarland's Beer Distributers and 
Skoal Bandits. 

The contest will run every week in 
the sports section and will feature 
the top college and professional foot- 
ball games of that week. 

The entrant who correctly picks 
the most winners will receive a case 
of Coke from McFarland's Beverage 
and a T-shirt and painters hat from 
Skoal Bandits. 

The rules for "Pick the Winners" 
are: 

1) All entries must be received in the 
Call office on the Friday following 
publication by 5 P.M. NO LATE 
ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently en- 
rolled at Clarion or be a member 
of the University Faculty. 

3) No machine-copied facsimilies or 
carbon copies will be accepted. 
ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant 
picking the winning team and 
closest to the final score of the tie- 
breaker will be declared the win- 
ner. All decisions involved in the 
event of a tie will be made by the 
Sports Editor of the Clarion Call 
and will be final. 

The winner will be announced 
each week in the Can. 



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Cross Country vs. Gannon, Slippery Rock, Grove City and 

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Women's Volleyball at Grove City. 



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14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 




Alcibiade places at 
Youngstown tourney 



Religion. 



By Jeff Harvey 



On Tuesday, Sept. 25, the Clarion 
University golf team traveled to 
Youngstown for an exhibition tour- 
nament. Clarion finished fifth out of 
14 teams in the tournament. The 
Golden Eagles ended the tourney 
one stroke ahead of PSAC West rival 
lUP, who had defeated Clarion in 
two earlier matches. 

Sophomore Jim Alcibiade was the 
medalist of the tournament for 
aarionwitha74. 

Finishing behind Alcibiade in the 
Youngstown tournament were: 
Mike Czap, 78; Don Dimoff, 79; Pete 



Leene, 81, and Barry Chase and Bill 
Sarsfield, 85. 

Clarion was also in action last 
week at Allegheny. The Golden Ea- 
gles earned second place in the tour- 
nament with a 386 behind Gannon 
University. 

In the Allegheny tournament, 
Bruce Chase of Clarion won 
medalist honors with a 72. 

Also teeing off for Clarion in the 
Allegheny tournament were: Don 
Dimoff, 74; Pete Leene, 78; Mike 
Czap and Bill Sarsfield, 81, and Jim 
Alcibiade, 83. 

The next and final exhibition golf 
match for Clarion will take place 
Tuesday, Oct 9 at Lock Haven. 



No. 33, Geoff Alexander and the re$t of the Golde n Eagles pulled together to de feat the Vulcans 23-14. 



By Michele La Tour 
Features Editor 



All area running enthusiasts now 
have an organization of their own. 
River Country Runners. 

River Country Runners is an or- 
ganization for runners ranging from 
joggers to marathon participants. 
Ilie organization began last spring 
by Gregory Clary, Director of Spe- 
cial Services, and Clarion 
University track coach, William 
English. 

The organization currently has 30 
members. They consist of faculty 



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Look for our SIDEWALK SALE 
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10 




River Country Runners 
organize for fun and racing 



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from the university, town and sur- 
rounding areas such as New Beth- 
lehem and Marienville. 

Some Clarion faculty members 
are; Qary, English, Robert Bubb, 
wrestling coach; Kenneth Grugel, 
Director of Financial Aid; Larry 
Dennis, Professor of English; 
Benjamin Freed, Chairperson of 
Mathematics and Cass Neely, Direc- 
tor of Upward Bound. 

A few River Country Runner 
members ran in the Clarion United 
Way lOK race and won as a Clarion 
University team. Team members 
that ran were: Clary, Grugel, Den- 
nis and Freed. English was a Direc- 
tor. 

Anyone interested in joining may 
contact Clary at 226-2347. The next 
meeting will be Oct. 9, 7 p.m. in 
Room 203 Tippin Gynmasium. Stu- 
dents are welcome. 

River Country Runners offers 
monthly programs on such topics 
as: Running in Heat, Improving 
your lOK Performance, Strength 
Training for Runners and Stretching 
for Runners. 

There is a yearly membership fee 
of $5. 



Bring thi$ coupon to the Clipper and 
receive one free punch on your new card 



Each luncheon card when punched 

for 10 lunches is good for 

1 FREE LUNCH. 

A $3.75 VALUE 



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CLIPPER LUNCHEON CARD 



May Be Used 
Mon. thru Fri. 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m 

Exit 9 - 1-80 & Rt. 68 
226-7950 



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Bible studies, instructional courses, 
canoeing, bowling, retreats, skating, 
and picnics. These events are pub- 
licized. Also available are a gospel 
choir and puppet and drama teams. 

Koinonia Christian F^ellowshtp 
meets every Monday night at 8 p.m. 
in Riemer Coffeehouse and Bible 
studies are held Thursday nights at 
8:30 in either Ralston or Given Res- 
idence Halls. 

Students wanting more infor- 
mation should call Dwight Dunn or 
Rob Struble at 3510 (on campus) or 
attend the fellowship meetings. 

The group, which has been on 
campus since 1%7, has approxi- 
mately 100 members. 

Koinonia Christian Fellowship is 
funded by contributions from local 
and surrounding area churches, 
alumni, and students. 

Fellowship of Christian Athletes 

The Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes (also known as FCA), accord- 
ing to president Craig Thomasmey- 
er, exists "to present the person of 
Jesus Christ to the campus and sur- 
rounding community through ath- 
letes and coaches expressing the 
love of Christ through fellowship and 
encouragement." 

FCA provides chapel service for 
the football team, retreats, and 
church services. The group works 
with area high school FCAs and 
youth groups and sponsors profes- 
sional athletes to speak on campus. 

Interested students should attend 
the regular meetings held on Tues- 
day nights at 7:30 in the basement of 
Campbell Residence Hall. The 
meetings last one hour. 

When asked if one had to be an ath- 
lete to become involved, Craig re- 
plied that FCA is open to all students 
though there is a regular service 
held especially for athletes. He said 
that it costs nothing to belong and 
there are approximately 100 active 
members. He went on to say FCA 
provides meaning and purpose in 
people's lives. He said it gives stu- 
dents a reason for attending classes. 

Other officers of FCA include vice 
president Mark Sunderland and ad- 
visors Paul Moviry and coach Rob- 
ert Bubb. 

The group, which has been on 
campus for seven years, is funded 
through personal donations. 
United Campus Ministry 

The United Campus Ministry is a 
co-operative ministry by five local 




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(Continued from Page 1) 

churches which offers counselling 
and sponsors various programs. 
Churches involved are: The First 
Baptist Church, Grace Lutheran 
Church, First United Methodist, 
First Presbyterian Church and Im- 
maculate Conception. 

Co-ordinator Mary Budde said the 
ministry is for students, faculty, ad- 
ministration, and staff of Clarion 
University and that it "enables them 
to do ministry on campus." She said 
the United Campus Ministry spon- 
sors the "Adopt-a-Grandparent" 
program, which works in co-opera- 
tion with the Clarion Medical Ser- 
vices Nursing Home, as well as a 
study break "Cookie Night" in dor- 
matory lobbies. She went on to say 
the organization, which was started 
a year ago, made churches "more 
responsible for campus ministry." 
She stressed that the primary pur- 
pose of the Ministry is to provide 
counselling for those wanting to talk. 
She said that clergymen are avail- 
able at the Ministry headquarters 
(located at 700 Wood Street) at 
various times and that this service is 
free. 

Anyone interested should call 226- 
6402 between 9 and 12 a.m. on Mon- 
days, Wednesdays, or Fridays. 

The United Campus Ministry gets 
its primary funding from the United 
Ministry of Higher Education. Its 
board of directors is made up of one 
clergyman, one layperson, and three 
students from each church. 



Clarion/Rock 
rivalry goes 
on Saturday 

The Golden Eagles lost their last 
game against Slippery Rock two 
years ago at Slippery Rock by a 
score of 28-17. In 1980 the Golden 
Eagles won by a narrow 6-0 at Slip- 
pery Rock. Last year Clarion won by 
a score of 24-6. 

The Clarion/Slippery Rock rivalry 
has dated back to 1928, with Slippery 
Rock leading the series 17-22-3. 

In the last seven meetings Clarion 
is leading the series with five wins, 
one loss, and one tie, but from 1971- 
76 Slippery Rock won five straight. 
Next Saturday Clarion returns home 
for their annual Homecoming game 
against lUP. 

NCAA Div. II 
rankings listed 

(Oct. 2, 1984) 
Team Record 

1 . Central State, Ohio 5-0 

2. Troy State 4-0 

3. Towson State 5-0 

4. North Dakota 5-0 

5. Santa Clara 4-0 

6. CLARION UNIVERSITY 40 

7. Norfolk State 4-0 

8. MIssouri-Rolla 4-0 

9. North Dakota State 3-1 

10. Nebraska-Omaha 4-1 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984—15 





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16— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 4, 1984 



Golden Eagles battle Vulcans for 23-14 win 



By Mike Kondracki 

Pat Carbol completed 14 of 28 
passes for two touchdowns, and 
Elton Brown gained 128 yards 
rushing to guide the Golden Eagles 
to a 23-14 win over California Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania on Satur- 
day. 

California quarterback Kevin 
Russell led the Vulcans' offensive at- 
tack, as he threw for 271 yards on 38 
attempts. However, the Vulcans 
were not able to establish a ground 
game, the Golden Eagles held them 
to jus)' 48 yards rushing. The Clarion 
defense was led by Kevin Ewing, 
Jon Hasslett, Jim Trovato, John 
Hughes, and Dom Broglia, all of 
whom recorded quarterback sacks. 
Bob Jarosinski and Lorenzo Burrus 
both had interceptions to add to the 
outstanding defensive play. 

Terry McFetridge, Scott Ickes, 
and Bob Green gained most of the 
reception yardage for the Eagles, 
and Geoff Alexander added 55 yards 
rushing to aid to the victory. Place- 
kicker Eric Fairbanks added three 
field goals as well. 

According to head coach Gene 
Sobolewski, California had to win 
this game, they came out fired up 
and ready to play. This forced the 
Golden Eagles to make some adjust- 
ments at half laie. 

A sad note r the Golden Eagles 
was that at tensive back Tim 
Jackson was injured during the 
gameonSatuiday. 

The Golden Eagles took the 
opening kickoff and began their 
opening drive on their own 19-yard 
line. Pat Carbol completed a 22-yard 
pass to Scott Ickes, and a five-yard 
pass to Terry McFetridge to the 
California 30 yard line. From there 
Carbol completed two more passes, 
one to Elton Brown and one to Bob 
Green to the 13-yard line to set up 
Eric Fairbanks' 29-yard field goal. 
The kick gave the Golden Eagles the 
early lead 3-0. 

Phil Bujakowski's kickoff was re- 
turned to the Vulcan 22. California 



quarterback Kevin Russell complet- 
ed a 13-yard pass to the 35. From 
there California stalled, and were 
forced to punt. 

In the next series of downs both 
teams exchanged punts. Following 
the Clarion punt, the Vulcans had the 
ball on their own 13-yard line. 
Russell then completed a pass to 
their split end Tom PietrcoUo to the 
27. Jim Trovato recovered a Russell 
fumble two plays later, and the 
quarter ented with the score Clarion 
3, California 0. 

The Golden Eagles had the ball on 
the Vulcan 25 at the start of the 
second quarter, but the California 
defense rose to the occasion and 
stopped Elton Brown short on a 
fourth and one play. California took 
over on their own 16. After a first 
down to the 29-yard line California 
was forced to punt. 

On the next series the Golden 
Eagles had the ball on their own 44- 
yard line. Three plays later Elton 
Brown carried for a gain of five 
yards but coughed up the football on 
the way and California recovered on 
their own 48. 

Kevin Russell and the California 
offense wasted no time in capitaliz- 
ing on the Clarion mistake, and five 
plays later Russell completed a 25- 
yard touchdown pass to Dave Lease. 
The pass put California on top for the 
first time in the game 7-3. 

There was no further scoring in 
the first half, and the score remain- 
ed 7-3. 

California took the second half 
kickoff and began at their own 20. 
Russell then scrambled for 19 yards 
to the 39 yard line, and tailback 
Chris Henthorn gained four more up 
the middle to the 43. On the next play 
Russell was sacked by defensive end 
Jon Hasslett, and there was a hold- 
ing penalty on California on the 
same play. The sack and the penalty 
moved the ball back to the Vulcan 
26-yard line. On the next play 
Russell fumbled the ball and the 
Golden E^agles recovered on the Cal- 
ifornia 21-yard line. 



Two carries by Elton Brown ad- 
vanced the ball to the 13-yard line, 
and a Carbol to McFetridge pass 
play moved the ball to the 7. From 
there the Eagles had a first and goal, 
but once again the Vulcans' defense 
stiffened and Eric Fairbanks was 
called upon for a 21-yard field goal. 
The kick brought the Golden Eagles 
to within one point of the Vulcans 7-6. 

Phil Bujakowski's kickoff was 
returned to the California 14-yard 
line where the Vulcans took over on 
downs. On the first play from scrim- 
mage, Russell completed an 86-yard 
touchdown pass to tight end Gary 
Bero and California advanced its 
leadtol4«. 

Penalties were accessed on the 
first two California kickoffs, so the 
Vulcans were forced to kickoff a third 
time. Following a clipping penalty on 
the Golden Eagles, they took over on 
their own 16. Elton Brown advanced 
the ball to the 24, but the Golden 
Eagles were still forced to punt. 

Following an exchange of punts by 
both teams, California had the ball on 
their own 44-yard line. Russell com- 
pleted a pass to Chris Henthorn for 
l(»s of yardage, Henthorn fumbled 
the ball and Kevin Ewing recovered 
at the California 31-yard line. 

Elton Brown carried to the 20-yard 
line, and Pat Carbol completed a 20- 
yard touchdown pass to Terry 
McFetridge to bring the Golden 
Eagles within two points 14-12. The 
two point conversion attempt failed, 
and with 4:12 left in the 3rd quarter 
the score remained 14-12. 

After the kickoff the Vulcans took 
over on downs at their own 11. A draw 
play to full back Ken Adams 
advanced the ball to the Vulcan 23. 
Russell then completed a pass to Tom 
PietrcoUo to the 32. John Haslett in- 
tercepted the next Russell passing 
effort and gave the Golden Eagles the 
ball on the California 22-yard line. 

Elton Brown carried to the 19 yard 
line, and a late hit penalty on the next 
play gave the Golden Eagles a 1st 
and goal at the California 4-yard line. 



Carbol then completed a 3-yard 
touchdown pass to McFetridge to 
give the Golden Eagles the lead. The 
two point conversion attempt was 
good, and the score was Clarion 20, 
California 14. 

Bujakowski's kickoff was not 
returned, and the Vulcans took over 
on their own 20. California was forced 
to punt by a stnxig Golden Eagle de- 
fense led by Kevin Ewing and Jon 
Haslett. 

Clarion took over on their own 43- 
yard line and marched down to the 
California 20-yard line behind the 
passing of Pat Carbol and the rushing 
of Elton Brown. This drive stalled, 
however, as Carbol's pass was inter- 
cepted by defensive back Art Motton. 



California took over on their own 
10-yard line. On the second play from 
scrimmage Lorenzo Burrus 
intercepted a Russell pass and 
returned it to the Vulcan 10. A 
clipping penalty brought the ball 
back to the California 37 where the 
Golden E^agles took over 1st and 10. 
Elton Brown then carried the ball to 
the Vulcan 16 to set up Eric Fair- 
banks' 33-yard field goal. The kick 
made the score Clarion 23, California 
14 with 1 : 33 left in the game. 

Tliere was no further scoring and 
the game ended with the score 23-14. 

The Golden Eagles travel to 
SliK)ery Rock this weekend to defend 
their 4-0 record against the Rockets. 




No. 84, Terry McFetridge celebrales after Saturday's win over California as a 
jubilant fan watches. 




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■■ 



wm^^ 




Vol. 56 No. 5 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Oct. 11,1984 



CJUmmj lUjumJ^ ofy 9v^M^»^h}<)JdJ0J 





MemtMfs of the 1984 Homecoming Court pose with hopeful smiles. From left to right, in the front row, Is Joyce Main- 
hart; the three seniors vying for the crown, Kimberly Ciaric, Kimberly Lees, and Chris Stugan; and Mary Beth Wuen- 
schel. In the back row is Michele Brady, Karia Bembeniclc. Barb Walker, Joyce Ahrens, Annette Flasher and Christina 
Swenson. Photo by Chuck Lizza, Photography Editor 

Homecoming court selected 

Stephen D. Stugan of 447 Saratoga 
Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, is a 
senior communication major. Spon- 
sored by Alpha Sigma Tau sorority, 
she is a graduate of Thomas Jeffer- 
son High School. 

Mainhart, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gordon C. Main hart of 241 Win- 
field Road, Sarver, PA 16055, is a 
junior elementary and early child- 
hood education major. Sponsored by 
Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, she is a 
graduate of Knoch Junior-Senior 
High School. 

Wuenschel, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniel G. Wuenschel of 4400 
Millfair Road, Fairview, PA 16415, is 
a junior elementary education ma- 
jor. Sponsored by Sigma Sigma Sig- 
ma sorority, she is a graduate of 
see Court, Page 2 



One of three Clarion University of 
Permsylvania seniors will be crown- 
ed 1984 Homecoming Queen Satur- 
day afternoon during halftime cere- 
monies of the Clarion vs. lUP foot- 
ball game at Memorial Stadium. 

The senior members of the home- 
coming court are Kimberly L. Clark 
of Belle Vernon, Kimberly S. Lees of 
Qarion, and Chris Stugan of Pitts- 
burgh. 

The annual Autumn Leaf Festival 
Parade is also held in Clarion on 
Saturday at noon, followed by the 
university football game at 2 : 30 p.m . 

Junior members of the court are 
Joyce Mainhart of Sarver and Mary 
Beth Wuenschel of Fairview. Sopho- 
more members are Karla Bemb- 
enick of Reynoldsville and Barb 
Walker of Mars, while freshman 



members are Michelle Brady of 
Glen Mills and Christina Swenson of 
Erie. Venango Campus in Oil City is 
represented by Annette Flasher of 
Oil City and Joyce Ahrens of Oil 

aty. 

Clark, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard D. Clark of RD 2 Stump 
Drive, Belle Vernon, PA 15012, is a 
senior elementary education major. 
Sponsored by Sigma Sigma Sigma 
sorority, she is a graduate of Belle 
Vernon Area High School. 

Lees, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William E. Lees of 51 Campbell 
Ave., Clarion, PA 16214, is a senior 
elementary education major. 
Sponsored by Zeta Tau Alpha soror- 
ity, she is a graduate of Clarion Area 
High School. 

Stugan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 



CUP Players underestimate and 
trivialize Williams' play 



By Benjamin Martin 



The joy in presenting any of the im- 
portant plays of Tennessee Williams 
is the challenge and exhileration of 
producing a work by one of the most 
significant and reciting talents of the 
American Theatre. The danger in 
presenting a Williams play is under- 
estimating the intricacies of the work 
and trivializing the characters. Both 
the joy and evidence of this danger 
were apparent in the CUP TTieatre 
production of "Cat on a Hot Tin 
Roof," presented in the Marwick- 
Boyd Little Theatre last week. 

Though perhaps not his best work, 
no other Williams play demonstrates 
his keen faculty for dialogue, sym- 
bolism and situation. The entire play 
tak^ place in the course of one sum- 
mer evening at a mammoth estate 



in the Mississippi Delta, built and op- 
erated by the larger than life Big 
Daddy Pollitt. 

Several things have happened be- 
fore the curtain rises. Brick, the 
youngest of Big Daddy's two sons, 
has broken his 1^ in a drunken at- 
tempt to relive past gridiron glories 
when he failed to clear a hurdle on 
the local track field the previous 
night. Big Daddy has return^ from a 
clinic where he had gone to deter- 
mine whether or not he had cancer. 
And Gooper, the oldest Pollitt son, 
has arrived with his wife, Mae, and 
their five children to celebrate Big 
Daddy's birthday and, more import- 
antly, to vie wiUi Brick as benefic- 
iary of the estate. 

The first act is virtually a mono- 
togue by Brick's wife, Maggie, the 
most vital character of the work. 



Tlirough this scene we learn that 
Brick refuses to have anything to do 
with her for what happened to his 
relationship with Skipper, his closest 
campanion and "the one great good 
thing in his life." Brick has become a 
reclusive alcoholic and the couple re- 
main childless. But one thing Maggie 
doesn't have is the "charm of the de- 
feated" and she is determined to win 
Brick back, bear his child, and not let 
Big Daddy's estate slip into the 
greedy hands of Gooper and Mae. 

Actors are a valuable, but fragile, 
commodity. It's the director's job to 
take the actor and lead him through 
the precarious darkness that is the 
theatre and into the light that is 
reality. But "Cat" director Bob Cope- 
land, who's celebrating his "Over 
100" performance, has left his talent 
see Review, Page 1 1 



Heart transplant 
patient bears child 



By Christine Minder 



The record books have been 
opened to record Betsy Sneith as the 
first heart transplant recipient to 
ever bear a child. This birth espec- 
ially hits home for one Clarion Uni- 
versity student - Ruth Sneith, sister 
of the new mother. 

Betsy, 23 years old, gave birth to 
Sierra Jamieson on Seotember 16 at 
7:05 a.m. Pacific Time. 

When doctors first diagnosed the 
pregnancy they warned Betsy not to 
go through with the birth because of 
her heart transplant. 

Betsy received a heart transplant 
four years ago by Dr. Jamieson. She 
was the recipient of a male's 23- 
year-old heart which the doctors 



thought may complicate the birth 
process. 

Fortunately, Sierra Jamieson is a 
perfectly healthy and happy seven 
pound, one ounce baby. Betsy's 
younger sister, Ruth Sneith, is a 
sophomore here at Clarion Univer- 
sity. She is very excited about her 
new niece. Ruth is a Communica- 
tions major and originally from 
Plum Borough. 

Ruth prides in her sister and her 
special niece. "When Betsy told me 
Sierra was perfect and beautiful, I 
wanted to tell the whole world! " 

"Aunt Ruth" saw her niece for the 
first time on Good Morning America 
Friday, Sept. 21. Betsy is now resid- 
ing in California. Ruth comments, 
"The baby looks adorable! " 



ALF parking is limited 



Parking Lots G-H-I-J-K are re- 
served for the ALF Parade from: 
12:00 a.m. (midnight) Friday, Oct. 
12to3:00p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13. 

•Cars parked in these lots during 



this time will be towed away at own- 
er's expense. 

It has been suggested vehicles nor- 
mally using these lots be parked in 
Lot "B" by Campbell Hall. 




Brothers of the Theta Chi fraternity tackle a flat bed and begin working it into 
a float for the ALF parade. Photo by Chuck Lizzi, Photography Editor 



ON THE INSIDE 

Editorial 2 Building history . 

Campaign '84 3 introducing 

Police report 4 Pick-the-Winner . 

Aid cuts 5 Football 



..8 

12 

.14 

.15 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 




Sunday night's debate between President Reagan and presidential 
hopeful Walter Mondale was hailed by many as "The Great Debate." 
Speculation ranged from predicting a winner and a loser to guessing who 
might look the nicest on television as the factors affecting the November 
6th poles. 

Well, Reagan stumbled through his opening statement about the 
budget, but essentially said a deficit is defined as excessive government 
spending, but that a four percent recovery by 1989 is being sought by his 
administration. 

Mondale said that it was a key test of leadership to address the 
major domestic issue of a balanced budget and that his plan, already 
outlined to the public in his campaign speeches, would not harm the 
things people need, senior citizens and students would not be burdened 
and that he would slow the rate of defense spending. 

On leadership, Reagan said the basis of his decision-making is not 
the political ramifications of an issue, but that a decision is morally right 
and good for the American people. 

Mondale, answering the initial question about leadership, said there 
is "a difference between a quarterback and a cheerleader" and that 
perhaps Reagan wasn't commanding the persons in the White House 
well enough. 

So why have I regurgitated the events of the debate just as millions 
of journalists have done all week? For the benefit of those folks who call 
themselves Americans, but did not watch the debate - what tock place 
Sunday night was important to everyone. 

Admittedly, 1 have oversimplified the debate and have stepped so 
far as to call non-watchers un-American, but I watched the debate. I was 
joined in my viewing by only one other person, while a few other people 
wandered in and out of the tv room in my dorm. When I quickly did an 
informal survey three-quarters of the way through the debate, found 
only three people watching the debate in the main tv room of the dorm 
and on the second floor I found one guy watching a boxing match. I 
wrongly assumed there would be no getting a seat near the tv during the 
debate. 

Now this debate may have been a boxing match of a different sort, 
but certainly one of greater national importance. 

Prior to the debate, Mondale said of the match-up, "It's probably the 
only chance during the campaign for you (the voters) to leam sonriething." 

I watched. I learned, a great deal. I just wish more students, those 
people who are the future, had watched and learned. 

Karen E. Hale 
Editor-in-Chief 




Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Features Editor MICHELE LaTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK. . 

Ptiotoflraphy Editor CHUCK LI2ZA 



Ad Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

. Circulation Manager OENISE SHEEKY 

Advisor ART BARLOW 

Consulting Editor THERESA WAIDA 

The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Per Agate Line $ .34 



Mail Subccriptlon Rates: 

Per Semester $5 

Per Academic Year $8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 



Police set-up search for assailant 




■•»HiW Pwnta u 




B tt - 



M 






««! 



01 



Clarion University Public Safety released this sketch of the male described 
to be in connection with Sunday's assaults. 



Court. 



Continued from Page 1 



Fairview High School. 

Bembenick, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. August Bembenick of RD 3 
Reynoldsville, PA 15851, is a sopho- 
more special education major and a 
graduate of Punxsutawney Area 
High School. 

Walker, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Walker of 119 Freedom 
Road, Mars, PA 16046, is a sopho- 
more psychology major. Sponsored 
by Zeta Tau Alpha sorority, she is a 
graduate of Seneca Valley High 
School. 

Brady, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerard T. Brady of 57 Dogwood 
Lane, Glen Mills, PA 19342, is a 
freshman communication major 
and a graduate of Garnet Valley 
Senior High School. 



^m^^e^fli^jx^/f-l—^ 



Swenson, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Swenson of 1210 Beaver 
Drive, Erie, PA 16509, is a freshman 
psychology major and a graduate of 
McDowell High School. 

Ahrens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Donald Paul Ahrens of 533 Gilbert 
Ave., Oil City, PA 16301, is a sopho- 
more nursing major at Venango 
Campus and a graduate of Oil City 
Area Senior High School. 

Flasher, daughter of Mrs. Angela 
M. Haslett of 3 Orange St., Oil City, 
PA 16301 and C. Joseph Flasher of 
294 W. Franklin St., Ephrata, PA 
17522, is a freshman sociology-psy- 
chology major at Venango Campus 
and is a graduate of Butler Senior 
High School. 



Clarion University Public Safety 
is searching for a male involved with 
a series of indecent exposures and 
one indecent assault which were re- 
ported over a two and a half hour 
period on the Clarion campus last 
Sunday afternoon. 

Tlie incidents occurred in Forest 
Manor and Campbell Hall, An inde- 
cent exposure incident in the game 
room and laundry room of Forest 
Manor was reported by three female 
students. The male is then reported 
to have entered a shower room in the 
women's section of Forest Manor. 
Later, another incident involving in- 
decent exposure and assault in a 
Campbell Hall shower room was re- 
ported by a female student. The 
female in the Campbell Hall shower 
room screamed and the male ran 
from the area. 

Pubhc Safety is continuing its in- 
vestigation into the incidents. Public 
Safety provided the following de- 
scription of the male suspect: Cau- 
casian, 5'9" to 5'11", slender built, 
mustache, dark brown hair, and 
wearing a plaid shirt, blue jeans, 
dark blue or maroon dress shoes 
with tassels. 

Anyone with information about the 
incidents is asked to call Public 
Safety at 226-2111. 

Public Safety officials stated 
there was absolutely no truth to 
rumors of rapes on campus. 



Correction 

In the October 4 issue of the 
Oarion Call, Mrs. Gayle Truitt-Bean 
was falsely named in a headline as 
having resigned from her position as 
coach for the Women's Gymnastics 
team. 

Truitt-Bean retired from her 
coaching position, but will continue 
teaching full-time as an assistant 
professor of Health and Physical 
Education. 




TtlROVtf R&Mam OUT WITHOUT iHm& liVSUttAUa lU 



ti$0 



If 



I 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984-3 



DeNardo to ride in A LF parade 



By Michael J. Downing 

It seems that the once liberal 
young people of this country have 
given way to a new generation of 
young, conservative thinkers. The 
apathetic and rebellious attitudes 
which once existed on American 
campuses have transformed into 
disciplined, determined positions. 

Ilie Reagan-Bush campaign has a 
large followmg on this and other 
campuses. In each state there are 
chapters of Young Republicans and 
a Youth for Reagan chairman. 
Iliese students coordinate voter reg- 
istration, hold meetings and stage 
rallies to assemble and strengthen 
the Republican vote. 

I think it's great that these stu- 
dents are getting involved in 
politics. All students must realize 
the effect they can have on an elec- 



tion. The combined votes of students 
across the nation could have a dra- 
matic effect upon the selection of our 
leader for the next four years. 

The course of our lives as Ameri- 
can citizens is determined by the 
people who hold office. They deter- 
mine our federal aid, student loans, 
housing policies, drinking age and 
whether we will go to war or not 
(just to name a few) . Don't you think 
that these are important enough 
issues to justify student mvolve- 
ment? 

Apathy of the public is the largest 
threat to freedom of the press. Voter 
apathy is the largest threat to 
modern democracy. We, as 
students, should overcome any 
existing apathy and make our voices 
heard in 1984. Remember, selecting 
our officials is an honor which few 
countries enjoy. Let's make the 
most of it. 



Contact Your Officials 



The following are the addresses of 
our elected officials. They encour- 
age your feedback through your let- 
ters. 

By Jim Pablo 

Ilie Honorable Arlen l^ctor(R), 
Senate Office Building, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20510 

H. John Heinz, IIKR) 
Senate Office Building, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20510 

Hie Honorable Robert Kusse (R) 
The Senate, Harrisburg. PA 17120 

Ihe Honorable Patrick J. Stapleton 
(D, The Senate, Harrisburg, PA 
17120 

Ihe Honorable David R. Wright (D) 
House of Representatives, Har- 
risburg, PA 17120 

The Honorable Merle E. Wiser 
Court House, Main Street, Clarion, 
PA 16214 

FredMcIlhattan(R) 
Court House, Main Street, Clarion, 
PA, 16214 

Thomas Armagost 
Court House, Main Street, Clarion, 
PA 16214 

Keith Martin (D> 
Court House, Main Street, Clarion, 
PA 16214 

ELECTION CALENDAR 

Oct. 9: Last day to register before 
the General Election. 

Oct. 30: Last day to apply for absen- 
tee ballots. 

Nov. 2: Absentee ballots must be 
turned into the Election Office. 

Nov. 6: GENERAL ELECTION 

Dec. 6: First day to register after 
the General ElecticHi. 

YOU MAY VOTE IN 1984 
IF YOU ARE: 

. . .a U.S. citizen by birth. 

. . .a naturalized U.S. citizen for at 
least one month. 

. . .at least 18 years of age. 

. . .a resident of PA. and your elec- 
tion district for at least 30 days. 

. . .REGISTERED TO VOTE 

YOU MAY VOTE BY MAIL 
(ABSENTEE BALLOT) IF: 

. . .you are away from home on 
Election Day for any reason. 

. . .you are a student attrading an 
institution of higher leamir^ away 
from home. 



. . .you are in the military service 
or are a hospitalized veteran. 

. . .you are physically disabled or 
ill. 

. . .you apply in person or in writ- 
ing to the County Board of Elections 
between 50 days and seven days 
prior to an election. 

. . .your ballot has beoi received 
by the County Board of Elections on 
the Friday before the election, not 
later than 4: 30 p.m. 

If you do not meet the require- 
ments of PA, inquire about voting by 
absentee ballot in your former state. 

YOU MAY REGISTER: 

1. At Clarion County Court House, 
Main St., Clarion. Weekdays 
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Closed on 
weekends and holidays. 

2. By mail. Post cards available at 
the Court House, Post Office, high 
schools, Welcome Wagon, or in- 
quire at Registrar's Office. You 
must re-register if you move, 
change your name, or have not 
voted within two years. 

POLLS OPEN FROM 7 A.M. TO 8 
P.M. FOR ALL ELECTIONS 



Joe DeNardo, weatherman and 
WTAE Channel 4 personality, is one 
of many VIPs scheduled to parti- 
cipate in the ALF Parade, Saturday, 
Oct. 13. 

Joe DeNardo and Pittsburgh Tele- 
vison News have been synonomous 
for many years. Joe graduated from 
Duquesne University in 1952 with a 
B.A. in mathematics and Physics 
and obtained his Masters Degree in 
Meterology from University of Chi- 
cago. 

Joe worked for 10 years at KDKA 
Radio and Television doing his 
weather forecasts and then moved to 
WTAE where he's been ever since. 
His good-natured ribbing of Paul 
Long has become a classic among 
viewers. 

Joe DeNardo has been honored by 
the American Meterological Society 
on numerous occasions and the 
society has given Joe's forecast 
their TV seal of approval. 

He is also a member of the Nation- 
al Council of Industrial Meterolo- 
gists and member of the Committee 
of Industrial Meterologists for the 
American Meterology Society. Joe 
also holds certification from the 
National Council of Industrial Me- 
terologists and is a Certified Con- 
sulting Meterologist. 

Joe is very active m the Special 
Olympics of Western Pennsylvania 
and sponsors the Joe DeNardo 
Celebrity Golf Tournament for the 
benefit of the Elk County Special 
Olympics. 

Joe and his wife Delores and two 
sons live in Moon Township in Pitts- 
burgh. 

Clarion University President Tom 
Bond is responsible for Mr. DeNar- 
do's appearance in the parade. 



Library Hours 

Additional study hall hours have 
been added to the Carlson Library 
schedule this term. The library will 
be open on a study hall basis from 10 
p.m. to midnight Sunday through 
Thursday. The full schedule of hours 
is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m.- 
Midnight* 

Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Saturday: lla.m.-5p.m. 

Sunday: 2 p.m.-Midnight* 

•Study Hall Only 10 p.m.-Midnight 
(Service points closed) 



S( 



KLINGENSMITH'S 
DRUG STORES, INC. 



1 




849 MAIN STREET 
CLARION. PA 16214 

Come to us 
for all your 
personal 
needs 



We have a Complete Supply of 
Halloween Candy, 

Cards, Gifts, etc. 

Open Daily 9 a.m.-9 p.m. ; Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 
PHONE: 226-8281 




WTAE's Joe DeNardo will be one of the special guests In the 33rd annual 
Autumn Leaf Festival parade. Photo courtesy Clarion Chamber of Commerce 



COLLEGIO'S 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

518 MAIN ST. 

EVERY TUESDAY: 5 P.M.CLOSE 
16" PIZZA $2.99 

(No Delivery on Special) 

FRIDAY 

Lasagne - $3.50 

Calzone - $2.25 
11 a.m. to Close 

DON'T FORGET OUR DELICIOUS DINNERS 

Manicotti $3.50 

Stuffed Shells $3.50 

Meat Ravioli $3.50 

Egg Plant Parmesan $4.25 

Veal Parmesan $5.25 

FREE DELIVERY 226-5421 




r 
I 



I 



ALF WEEK COUPON 

50% OFF 

■ ALL 

"MEN'S DIAMOND RINGS 

WITH THIS COUPON UNTIL OCT. 16 



I 
I 



JAMES JEWELERS 

DOWNTOWN CLARION 



USE OUR LAY-AWAY 




4— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 




Dr. Donald Wilson, of Clarion's English Department, smites about the sum- 
mer he spent in Halifax, Nova Scotia, studying Canadian poetry. He receiv- 
ed a grant from the Canadian Embassy to study there and he will be develop- 
ing a course in Canadian poetry to be offered here next fall. 



GRAND OPENING 

OCT. 4-14 

GARDNER'S 
CANDIES 

in the Clarion Mall 

SPECIAL! Purchase 1 lb. of our famous 

peanut butter meltaways at $3.98 
a lb. and receive Vi lb. of water 
blanched peanuts - FREE 

Largest assortment of 

fine chocolate, cooked nuts and 

ice cream in Pennsylvania! 

"Give your taste buds a treat" 



GARDNER'S 
CANDIES 

Hours: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 
12- 5 p.m. Sun. 

226-6272 




Clarion Police need testimonies 
in order to prosecute 



By ionaihan Shxmmons 

Clarion Police are asking that any- 
one who wishes to file a complaint 
must t)e willing to offer a testimony 
or be willing to assist the police in 
some way. It is simply not worth 
their valuable time to investigate a 
reported incident without a sufficient 
follow-up. 

Crimes of a criminal or sexual na- 
ture though, should always be re- 
ported. 

The following is the Clarion Police 
report issued on Sept. 24, 1984: Sept. 
21: Clarion Police conducted a traf- 
fic check on E. Main Street in which 
no citations w^e issued, (Hily two 
warnings; one for obstruction to 
driver mechanism and one for no li- 



cense or registration. 

Sept. 22: Two cassette tape decks 
were reported stolen. One belonging 
to Mark Chemini of College Park, 
the other to Jeff DiFucci of Green- 
ville Ave. Both were valued at ap- 
proximately $150. 

Sept. 22: Police apprehended driv- 
er Roger L. Miller, age 39 of Oak 
Ridge, Pa., and passenger, 23-year- 
old Douglas Miller of New Bethle- 
hem, Pa. on charges of DWI and 
reckless driving. 

Sept. 22: Timothy Shannon of 
l^aron, Pa. received a citation for 
failing to stop at the intersection of 
Wood Street and Sixth Ave. 

Sept. 22: Police received a report 
of the theft of the flag from the front 
of the American Legion on Main St. 



Sept. 23: Walter B. Alapic was 
cited for retail theft and public 
drunkenness after attempting to 
steal a pizza from Country Fair, 
then after being discovered threw 
the pizza at the clerk. 

Sept. 23: Calvin Cyphert Jr. of Mt. 
Pleasant, Pa. reported the theft of a 
camera, a tent, a sleeping bag and a 
cooler from the rear of his truck 
which was parked at 19 5th Ave. 

Sept. 23: Samuel Mosholder of 
Sligo, Pa. received a citation for 
traveling the wrong way on the one- 
way street, 7th Ave. 

Sept. 28: PoUce received a false 
report of an alleged stabbing at the 
"nieta Chi fraternity house. * 



Ali-Zaidi addresses Faculty Senate 



By Dina Gruey 



Dr. Ali-Zaidi, Chairman of the 
Council of Trustees, addressed the 
Faculty Senate during its by-monthly 
meeting this past Monday. Dr. Ali- 
Zaidi briefly explained the function 
of the Board of Governors for the 
state's university system and called 
upon the senate to provide "intel- 
lectual leadership to the university 
and the community." 

The faculty senate, which is chau*- 
ed by Dr. Enid Dennis, is respon- 
sible for reviewing and approving 



any major changes to the academic 
curriculum. In addition, the legisla- 
tive body deals with common con- 
cerns to the university through var- 
ious committees and sub-commit- 
tees such as the Policy Committee 
and the Student Affairs Committee. 
The senate consists of 23 members 
from the main campus (including 
Dr. Bond) and two from Venango, 
each elected by their peers to a 
three-year term. Regular meetings 
are held on alternating Mondays at 4 
p.m. in Room 140 Peirce. All stu- 
dents are welcome to attend. 



1984-85 FACULTY SENATE 

Dr. Thomas Bond, Mr. Robert 
Bubb, Dr. Brigitte CaUay, Dr. Anne 
Day, Dr. Enid Dennis, Mr. Brian 
Dunn, Mr. Emmett Graybill, Dr. 
Harold Hartley, Ms. Janice Horn, 
Ms. Catherine Joslyn, Ms. Mary Ka- 
voosi. Dr. Gregg Lacy, Dr. Francine 
McNairy. 

Mr. Melvin Mitchell, Dr. Randall 
Potter, Dr. Ronald Shumaker, Dr. 
Earl Siler, Dr. William Snedegar, 
Mr. Richard Snow, Dr. Dean Staffin, 
Dr. Kenneth Traynor, Ms. Susan 
Traynor, Dr. Adam Weiss, Dr. Rob- 
ert Yoho, Dr. Arnold Zaeske. 



Youth enrichment programs offered 



Saturday enrichment programs 
for young people in grades one 
through 12 will be held at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania from 
Oct. 27 through Dec. 8. 

The courses, which feature a wide 
variety of interesting subjects, will 
meet between 9 a.m. and noon. Each 
class will be 90 minutes in length and 
students are encouraged, but not re- 
quired, to sign up for two courses in 
order to make their mornings a most 
meaningful experience. Several 
courses are open to parents. 



The courses include: Abbra Ca 
Dabbra!, Drawing and Pamting, 
Basketweaving, Spanish, Creative 
Dramatics, Trip to the Constella- 
tions, Photography, Introduction to 
Television Production, Monsters! 
The Scary Ones and the Funny Ones, 
Me, Myself, and I, Teen Drama 
Workshop, Secret Codes, Thunder 
Lizards, Mysteries of the Pyramids, 
and French. 

Cost of the courses is $60 for two 
classes. Registration or more in- 
formation can be obtained by con- 



tacting: Office of Continuing Edu- 
cation, Clarion University of Penn- 
sylvania, Clarion, PA 16214 (814-226- 
2227) or Carol Hillman, RD 2, Box 
686A, Shippenville, PA 16254 (814- 
226-6236). 

y 

NEWS TIP? 
Call 2380 







Enjoy Your Party 

After the Game 

With Us! 





THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984-5 



College programs targets for future cuts 



College programs may be more 
vulnerable than ever to budget cuts 
in the next year because several key 
congressmen will be missing from 
House education committees, 
sources say. 

The missing congressmen all 
played important roles in staving off 
many of President Reagan's 
proposed student aid cuts in the last 
three years. 

They are leaving their commit- 
tees, moreover, as Congress consid- 
ers the Higher Education Reauthor- 
ization Act of 1985, a crucially-im- 
portant law that will set federal col- 
lege policy for the rest of this dec- 
ade. 

Missing will be Rep. Carl Perkins 
(D-Ky), chairman of the House Edu- 
cation-Labor Committee, who died 
this summer, and Rep. Paul Simon 
(D-Il), chair of the House Subcom- 
mittee on Postsecondary Education, 
who is running for the Senate 
against Charles Percy. 

Two other House education com- 
mittee members are retiring this 
year. 



"Perkins was probably the person 
most responsible for holding the line 
against budget cuts Reagan has pro- 
posed since 1980," says Dallas 
Martin, head of the National Asso- 
ciation of Student Financial Aid Ad- 
ministrators. 

"It was clearly his strong leader- 
ship on that committee that refused 
to go along with some of the (cuts). 
It will take another individual a 
long, long time to live up to Carl 
Perkins' standards," Martin says. 

Simon, as subcommittee chair- 
man, opposed making students pass 
a "needs test" to get loans, and 
helped mobilize the impressive na- 
tionwide libbying efforts that turned 
the tide against the student aid cuts 
in 1982. 

The Education committees are 
also losing representatives Ray Kog- 
ovsek (D-Co) and Frank Harrison 
(D-Pa). Kogovsek is retiring, and 
Harrison lost a primary race earlier 
this year. 

While the departures are "not 
going to be positive, there will be no 
less commitment on the parts of the 



remaining members," counsels Wil- 
liam Blakey, the subcomnaittee's 
staff director. 

Commitment or not, some con- 
gressional sources say the losses 
will make education a relatively 
easy target for budget cuts next Jan- 
uary, when the new Congress tries to 
slash the $175 billion federal deficit. 

"Higher education programs are 
going to have to be reauthorized in a 
year when programs are probably 
going to be cut in order to deal with 
the huge deficit," observes Polly 
Gault, staff director of the Senate 
Education Subcommittee, which 
will lose Sen. Jennings Randolph (D- 
Va) to retirement. 

"Reauthorization will be a bit 
more difficult than in 1980, the last 
time Congress set long-term educa- 
tion goals," Gault adds. 

It will be more difficult, too, be- 
cause of the relative inexperience of 
the people replacing Perkins and 
Simon in the House. 

The most experienced contender 
to replace Simon is Rep. William 
Ford (D-Mi), who once chaired the 



History prof speakes in New York 



Dr. Mohammad I. Khan, Profes- 
sor of History, Clarion University, 
will chair a panel on "Roundtable 
On Afghanistan: Strategic Impor- 
tance And Global Perspectives", at 
the 1984 New York Asian Conference 
to be hosted by State University of 
New York at its Cortland College, on 
Oct. 12, 1984. Other members of the 
panel are: 

Dr. Thomas Gouttierre, Director, 
Center for Afghanistan Studies, Uni- 
versity of Nebraska at Omaha. 

Dr. George Collins, Professor of 
History, Wichita State University. 

Mr. Sabahuddin Kushkhaki, for- 
mer Minister of Information, Gov- 
ernment of Afghanistan, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Mr. Tayyab Siddiqui, Counselor 
for Education, Embassy of Pakis- 
tan, Washington, D.C. 

Dr. Dilnawaz Siddiqui, Associate 
Professor of Communications at 
Qarion University will be the Dis- 
cussant of the panel. 

Papers wiU be presented by the 
panelists dealing with the "Question 
of Unifying the Resistance Move- 
ment in Afghanistan", "The Impact 
of Afghan Refugees on Pakistan", 
Resistance Movement Among the 
Afghans in Peshawar" and "India, 
Afghanistan and Soviet Union." 

According to Dr. Clark, the Pres- 
ident of tiie host campus, the pro- 
gram is "very impressive in the 
number of panels and papers sched- 
uled and in the broad scope of the 
topics and regions covered. It is 
especially noteworthy that many of 
the presenters are traveling from 
other states and other nations to par- 
ticipate." The Conference will 



continue for two days. 

Dr. Khan is currently a member of 
the Program Committee for 1984 
annual Conference of Mid-Atlantic 
Region/Association for Asian 
Studies and Editor of Asian Mes- 
senger. He is the past-President of 
MAR/AAS in 1978, when the annual 
conference was successfully hosted 
at Clarion campus. Dr. Khan is also 
a member of the Development 
Committee of the Association for 
Asian Studies, the parent body of 
MAR/AAS, and the most prestigous 
academic organization of Asian Stu- 
dies in United States and Canada. It 
has a membership of some 7,000 
from all over the world. In March 
this year. Dr. Khan presented a pa- 
per at Washington, D.C. in a panel 
chaired by Dr. Goheen, former U.S. 
Ambassador to India and past Pres- 
ident of Princeton. This panel 
included the most outstanding 
scholars of South Asia. 




Dr. Mohammad I Khan, Professor of 
History at Clarion University, will 
speak and present his paper at the 
University of New York on October 12. 



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Postsecondary Education Subcom- 
mittee but who faces opposition 
from Rep. Ike Andrews (D-NC) in 
his effort to regain the post. 

Ford sheparded the 1980 reauthor- 
ization act through the House, but 
gave up his education position to 
become head of the Post Office of the 
Civil Service Subcommittee in 1981. 

Ford may want the education sub- 
committee chairman back to get in 
line for a bigger position. "He wants 
to chair (the whole) Education-La- 
bor (committee)," says Kathy Ozer, 
lobbyist for the U.S. Student Asso- 
ciation (USSA). 

House rules, however, prohibit 
members from holding two subcom- 
mittee chairmanships at the same 
time. 

Ford is optimistic he'll be exempt- 
ed from the rule, says Tom Wola- 
min. Ford's staff aide. 

But Alan From, staff director of 
the Democratic Caucus, notes, "Ford 
isn't the only person who would like 
to have the rules changed for his own 
benefit. There are probably younger 
members who would like to get a 
chance to run a subcommittee." 

Wolamin says Ford is willing to 
give up his chairmanship of another 
subcommittee to get the postsecond- 
ary education post. 

"I would be very surprised if they 
allow him to take the subcommittee 
over because I think it' would anger 
some of the younger members who 



don't have a chairmanship of any- 
thing," says Rose Dinapoli, a 
Republican legislative associate mi 
the subcommittee. "It's a very 
powerful subcommittee." 

In the meantime, the House last 
week appointed Rep. Gus Hawkins 
(D-Ca) to take over the full Educa- 
tion-Labor Committee. 

Hawkins, who is best known as an 
expert in labor legislation, has an 
"outstanding record" on education 
issues like student aid, Martin as- 
serts. 

On the Senate side, the Senate 
Education Subcommittee will 
remain under senators Claiborne 
Pell (D-RI) and Robert Stafford (R- 
Vt). 

Only one senator on the Senate 
education committee. Pell, is up for 
reelection, and he is expected to win 
an easy victory. 

Nevertheless, staff aide Gault 
thinks education will have a tougher 
time in Congress next year. 

"I have confidence in our ability to 
defend education programs (from 
proposals to cut them)," she says. 
"We have shown that repeatedly 
over the past few years." 

But the reauthorization bill will be 
another story, she predicts. "The 
1980 reauthorization gave a lot of 
people exactly what they wanted. 
That is not Stafford or Pell's style, 
given the responsibility of deficit re- 
duction." 




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6— THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct 11 1984 




Brooke Qarbarino introducas "Muffin", one of the animals primed for pet- 
ting at the Autumn Leaf Festival Petting Zoo, scheduled for Friday, Oct. 12 
on the Courthouse lawn on Main Street. Brooice is the daughter of Joyce and 
Barry Garbarino from Marianne Estates. Photo by Joy Dunbar-Fueg 



L N II Y IE IP S llir 



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MAIN STREEt& 4th AVE 



Beginning October 15th — 

A limited number of rooms 

are available for student housing 

• $700 per semester for single occupancy 

• $1200 per semester for double occupancy 
• $175 per month per person 

THE UNIVERSITY INN 

340 MAIN STREET 
CLARION 
226-7200 



Financial aid recipients 
must meet requirements 



In order to continue receiving fi- 
nancial aid following initial enroll- 
ment at Clarion University of Penn- 
sylvania, students must meet cer- 
tain conditions each year. 

Students must be enrolled for at 
least half-time and must re-apply for 
aid each year. Baccaluareate stu- 
(tents may receive assistance from 
most fedwal, Title IV, and state aid 
programs for each of their under- 
graduate years providing that they 
maintain "normal academic pro- 
gress." Tliis means that undergrad- 
uate students must successfully 
complete a minimum of 24 semester 
hours by the end of each academic 
year, including the summer, before 
they can be granted assistance for 
their next school year. 

Part-time undergraduate students 
must successfully complete a min- 
imum of 12 sem^ter hours during 
each academic year, including the 
sununer, to continue receiving any 
financial assistance. 

Graduate students must success- 
fully complete 18 semester hours by 
the end of each academic year, in- 



cluding the summer, before they can 
be granted assistance for their next 
school year. 

Part-time graduate students must 
successfully complete nine semester 
hours during each academic year, 
including the summer, to continue 
receiving any financial assistance. 

For financial aid purposes an un- 
dergraduate student becomes a 
sophomore with 24 credits, a junior 
with 48, and a senior with 72. These 
credit levels for class standing apply 
to financial aid only and not to other 
academic considerations. Students 
should also understand that 
completing 24 semester hours per 
year will not qualify them for grad- 
uation in four years, but rather in 11 
semesters. Providing that a student 
has a 2.0 QPA or is officially per- 
mitted to attend Garion, he/she 
may continue to receive financial as- 
sistance as long as the 24 semester 
hour progress requirement is being 
met. 

If a student is denied financial aid 
for any reason, he or she may appeal 
the denial as follows : 



1. Write to the Office of Financial 
Aid, Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Clarion, PA 16214, noting the 
denial and stating the reasons why 
financial aid should not be denied. 
Example: A student may be daiied 
aid because it appears he/she has 
fewer than 24 credits for the year. 
Perhaps during the summer at 
another institution the student has 
earned, for transfer to Clarion, 
credits which will fulfill the normal 
progress requirement but about 
which the University has not been in- 
formed. The student may present 
the appeal in person at the Office of 
Financial Aid in Egbert Hall instead 
ofvkTiting. 

2. The Office of Financial Aid will 
review the denial in terms of infor- 
mation provided by the student. 

3. Following the review the Office 
of Financial aid will report back to 
the student concerning the appeal. 

4. If the student questions the de- 
cision of the Office of Financial Aid 
an appeal may be made to the Vice 
President of Student Affairs for a fi- 
nal determination. 



Ten new scholarships offered 



The Scholarship Bank has an- 
nounced 10 new scholarship pro- 
grams that are currently accepting 
applications from college students. 
Funds are now available in the fol- 
lowing fields: 

College Teaching: The Danforth 
Foundation offers up to $3,500 per 
year to students interested in 
teaching as a profession. Twenty- 
five percoit of the 3,000 annual 
awards go to minorities. 

Exceptional Student Fellow- 
^ips: Awarded by a major life in- 



surance company to students in 
business, law, computer program- 
ing, accounting and related fields. 
These awards require summer 
interning. 

Anthropology, biology, conserva- 
tion, marine science, sociology: 
Field Research project grants from 
$300 to $600 per appUcant. 

Foynter Fund; Annual scholar- 
ships to $2,000 for students in jour- 
nalism, broadcasting and related 
fields. 

Center for Political Studies: 



Internships in political science, jour- 
nalism, law, public relations, bus- 
iness, history and education. 

White House Fellowships: Highly 
competitive graduate level fellow- 
ships to work as an intern at tiie 
White House. 14-20 openings per 
year. 

Students interested in getting a 
personalized print-out of financial 
aid sources should send a stamped 
self addressed envelope to Schol- 
arship Bank, 10100 Santa Monica No. 
2600, Los Angeles, CA. 90067. There 
is a modest charge. 



Wachob pushes for a debate 



By Lisa Capella 



On September 14, State Represent- 
ative Bill Wachob, a candidate for 
U.S. Congress in the 23rd district, 
criticized his opponent William 
Clinger for refusing to participate in 
a broad series of debates, and for 



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refusing, m particular, to partici- 
pate in a commercial television de- 
bate. Rep. Clinger stated that he 
would be willing to participate only 
for PubUc Television and for one 
county or radio debate later in the 
campaign. 
Rep. Wachob feels disappointed 
1 because Mr. Clinger is rejecting the 
chance to "provide the public a 
broader opportunity to examine our 
records and our positions on the 
pressing issues." He also suggested 
that Congressman Clinger was un- 
willing to stand the test of public 
exposure for Public Television's 
viewing audience is significantly 
smaller than the commercial sta- 
tions which are ready to sponsor a 
debate. 

The two television stations in- 
terested in sponsoring the debate 
were WTAJ/channel-10 and WPSX/ 



channel-3. In many counties the 
audience of WTAJ channel-10 is 
nearly 10 times greater than 
WPSX's audience. And in Clearfield, 
the WTAJ audience is 20 times 
greater than the WPSX's audience. 
With this decision Rep. Wachob 
concluded that "Mr. Clinger is 
afraid of what the public will learn 
about his record on the unemployed, 
his record on medicare cuts, his 
record on consumer protection, and 
his record on arms control. He also 
commented that since the Congress- 
man uses channel-10 to communicate 
his own selective message, then he 
should be willing to use it for (^n 
forum on the issues. But Rep. ding- 
er's decision on the Public Televi- 
sion station still has not changed. 
October 10, 11, and 12 are the Con- 
gressmen's preferred dat^ for the 
telecasted debate. 



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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1 1 , 1984—7 



Small Business Center receives award 



The Small Business Development 
Center (SBDC) of Clarion Univer- 
sity has received a Keystone Award 
of Merit from the Governor's 
Private Sector Initiatives Task 
Force. 

The award was presented to the 
center in recognition of "exemplary 
volunteer community service," said 
Dr. Woodrow W. Yeaney, SBDC di- 
rector, and was based upon the free 
management assistance and small 
business services provided by the 
SBDC to the business community in 
an U-county surrounding area. 

Governor Dick Thornburgh began 
his Private Sector Initiatives Task 



Force in July 1983 to stimulate pri- 
vate sector initiatives throughout 
the Commonwealth. The 50-member 
Task Force is comprised of individ- 
uals representing business, labor, 
foundations, the media, the non-pro- 
fit sector and the educational com- 
munity. The Task Force recently 
completed a survey of organizations 
and partnerships which serve Penn- 
sylvania communities. A 
community partnership is simply 
two or more individuals or organiza- 
tions working together to meet a 
community need. Chairman of the 
Task Force, William J. Copeland, 
retired Vice-Chairman of the Pitts- 




The Clarion University Golden Eagle Marching Band, led by the Silk Squad, 
will be the first musical unit to march the Autumn Leaf Parade route on Sat- 
urday, Oct. 13, for the 25th consecutive year. Members of the Silk Squad are: 
Chris Smith, Patty Pocta.KIm Schaffer, Michelle Alishouse, Debbie Chiko- 
sky, Deanne Heasley, Mindy Nave, Patty Ingram, and Marina Bamett. 



Crime bill passed 



By Susan Ohler 



The long-delayed Crime Control 
Act of 1983, which was passed by the 
Senate aknost a year ago, has finally 
been passed by the House. 

After passing through the Senate 
and being sent to the House, the 
crime bill was shelved by the House 
Judiciary Committee. In response to 
the action. Rep. William F. Qinger 
Jr. (R-Pa), a member of the Con- 
gressional Crime Caucus, joined 78 
of his colleagues in the House and 
Senate in an effort to force the 
stalled anti-crime legislation into 



the House for a vote. The caucus 
believed that the legislation would 
help to strengthen the federal re- 
sponse to crime in America. 

"Some might say crime in 
America is a problem without solu- 
tions, but we in the crime caucus dis- 
agree," Clinger said. 

Clinger, before joining the crime 
caucus, said he had his doubts that 
the crime bill tightening sentencing, 
drug control, insanity, bail, parole 
and other provisions of federal crim- 
inal law would ever come up for a 
vote in the House. 




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CLARION, PA. 

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burgh National Bank, commented, 
"Our Task Force is honoring or- 
ganizations throughout Pennsylva- 
nia who volunteer their tune to solve 
community problems. 

Over 300 organizations in Penn- 
sylvania were considered for the 
honor, but only 25 received awards. 

The Clarion Small Business De- 
velopment Center is an excellent 
example of a community part- 
nership, according to Yeaney. Be- 
gun in January, 1981, the Center is 
the result of the efforts of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, the En- 
trepreneurial Technology Center, 
the Northwest Regional and North 



Central Regional Development 
Commissions, the Clarion County 
Authority, County Planning Author- 
ities, various County Commission- 
ers, the Small Business Admini- 
stration and many Chambers of 
Commerce. The SBDC also has 
strong associations with the 
Carnegie Mellon University and the 
University of Pennsylvania in pro- 
moting university and business part- 
nerships. 

The Center offers management as- 
sistance' in the areas of starting a 
business, accounting, loan proposal 
packaging, strategic planning, fore- 
casting and marketing. In addition 



to one-on-one consulting, the center 
also sponsors one-day conferences 
at various locations throughout an 11- 
county jurisdiction on business re- 
lated topics. Upcoming topics this 
fall include "Women in Business", 
Oct. 8; "Tax and Legal Aspects of 
Small Business", Oct. 24; 
"Economical and Environmental 
Advantages of Raising Hybrid Pop- 
lar Plantations", and "Advertising 
and Marketing faor Small Busi- 
nesses", Nov. 7. 

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Clarion hosts tech conference 



The Clarion University Entrepre- 
neurial Technology Center is hosting 
a conference entitled "The Envir- 
onmental, Economic, and Energy 
Advantages of Hybrid Poplar Plan- 
tations". The conference will be held 
Friday, Oct. 19, at the Clarion Shera- 
ton Inn, located at the intersection of 
Route 68 and Interstate 80. Registra- 
tion for the conference begins at 8 : 30 
a.m., with sessions starting at 9 a.m. 

The conference is based on the 
theme "Land is one of Pennsylva- 
nia's prime resources and its util- 
ization will benefit the state's econ- 
omy through the creation of new 
jobs and businesses." It should 
appeal particularly to land owners, 
sewage facilities managers, envir- 
onmentalists, representatives of 
county industrial authorities, and 
those involved in paper production. 
A variety of topics dealing with the 
hybrid tree will be presented, rang- 
ing from "Chemical Pulping Tech- 
niques" to "Uses and Potential Ben- 
efits of the Fast Growing, Hybrid 



Poplar Tree". Speakers at the con- 
ference include Morton Fry of Miles 
W. Fry and Son, Inc., John Iverson 
of Domtar Forest Products, Dr. 
Kendall Pye of Biological Energy 
Corporation, Rick Cotter of Pantech 
Engineers and David Cunningham, 
an independent energy consultant. 

The cost of attending the confer- 
ence is $20.00, which covers ma- 
terials, coffee breaks, and lunch. To 



register, interested parties should 
send their name, address, phone 
number and business they represent 
(if applicable), with a check made 
payable to Clarion University Foun- 
dation to: College of Continuing 
Education, Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214. 

For additional information, con- 
tact the Entrepreneurial Technology 
Center at (814) 226-2060. 



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8— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 



Buildings on campus have real personality 



By Michele LaTour 
Features Editor 



The names of buildings on campus 
are important so that one knows 
where their home, classes or meals 
are. But what about the people 
behind the names? Their faces and 
personalities are unknown to many. 

People travel in and out of the 
campus buildings and never stop to 
think about where the name came 
from and why each building holds 
that particular name. 

Almost every building on campus 
is named after a faculty or staff 
member. Some excq?tions are Car- 
rier and Founder's. 

Many of the names of the buildings 
are people who have devoted 20 
years or more to Clarion. They are: 
John Ballentine, Charles F. Becker, 
Margaret A. Boyd, Frank M. Camp- 
bell, Rena M. Carlson, Paul G. 
Chandler, William R. Egbert, 
Lorena Given, Marie Marwick, Ber- 
tha V. Nair, Donald D. Peirce, Hazel 
Sandford, Dana S. Still, Waldo S. 
Tippin, J.W.F. Wilkinson. Members 
over 30 years of dedication were: 
John Ballentine, Frank M. Camp- 



bell, Rena M. Carlson, Bertha V. 
Nair, I>onald D. Peirce, Hazel Sand- 
ford, Waldo S. Tippin and J.W.F. 
Wilkinson. 

Each personality behind the build- 
ing is just as important as the build- 
ing itself. An introduction to each 
personality may shine some light 
and new respect for each of the 
buildings on the Clarion campus. 

Ballentine Hall is named after 
John Ballentine (1848-1934), a teach- 
er at Clarion for 37 years. He was 
also an acting principal at two 
separate times. Ballentine taught 
Ancient Languages and Historical 
Sciences. He retired in 1920. 

Ballentine Hall was completed in 
1^1 containing accommodations for 
115 men. 

Becht Hall is named after George 
J. Becht (1865-1925), Principal from 
1904 through 1912. During his term, 
enrollment rose in 1911-1912 by 65 
percent. Becht left Clarion to be- 
come Secretary of the State Board of 
Education in 1912. 

Becht Hall, originally Navarre 
Hall, was erected in 1908. 

Becker Hall is named after Char- 
les F. Becker (1878-1972), a teacher 



for 24 years at Clarion. Becker 
taught Professional Education and 
was for many years director of the 
Office of Student Teaching and 
Placement. Becker is also noted as 
the founder of EUwood City 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Marwick-Boyd, completed in 1969, 
is actually named for two women, 
Margaret A. Boyd and Marie Mar- 
wick. Both women arrived at Clar- 
ion in 1929 and left in 1959. They 
shared a room together as residents 
of Becht HaU. 




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Boyd was a teacher for composi- 
tion, literature and speech courses. 
She was also the forensics advisor, 
faculty sponsor of Panhellenic Coun- 
cil, and the advisor of Alpha Psi 
Omega dramatic fraternity. 

Marwick taught advanced speech 
courses. She was a sponsor of the 
College Players and director of all 
dramatic presentations. 



Campbell Hall was named after 
Frank M. Campbell (1911-1972). 
Campbell held many titles and jobs 
while at Qarion such as: assistant 
dean of men, head resident of Eg- 
bert Hall, member of music and so- 
cial studies department, supervisor 
of student teachers, instructor of 
French and Spanish courses and 
also, for a decade, director of Alum- 
ni Office and Editor of Alunmi Asso- 
ciation Publication. Printed in the 
aarion Call for March 3, 1972: 

If Frank Campbell gets aa much 
fullness and enjoyment out of his af- 
terlife as he did out of his first, he 
will be a happy man indeed. We will 
miss him. 

Carlson Library is named after 
Rena M. Carlson. She was bom in 
1898 and is still alive. Carlson was 
educated at Carnegie Library School 
of Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
Carlson left Qarion in 1963 after 34 
years of dedication to the school. 

Carrier Administration, one of the 
buildings on campus not named 
after a faculty or staff member is 
named after the Carrier family. The 
Carrier name came from Hiran and 
Nathan Carrier Jr., who were two of 
15 citizens on the board of trustees. 
They were generous contributers to 
the school. The amount is thought to 
be around $10,000. 

Chandler Dining Hall is named 
after Paul G. Chandler. He was at 
Clarion for 23 years and was 
President. Oiandler was construct- 
ed in 1963. 

Davis Hall is named after Aaron J. 
Davis, who was the principal from 
1887-1902. He also taught Pedagog- 
ies, Mental and Moral Sciences, His- 
tory of Education and the Science 
and Art of Teaching. Davis was 
erected in 1936. 

Egbert Hall is named after Wil- 
liam R. Egbert, who put forth 24 
years of service to Clarion. Egbert 
was erected in 1938 and was original- 
ly a men's hall. 

Founders Hall the renamed "Old 
Science Hall", was built in 1894. The 
name was changed because Donald 
D. Peirce was named the science 
center. The rename is in the honor of 
the institution's founding fathers. 

Founders originally contained 
nine recitation rooms, science labor- 
atory, principal's office, dormitory 
rooms, organizational rooms, and 
eventually a book room and store. 

Given Hall is named after Lorena 
Given. Given gave 26 years of ser- 
see Buildings, Page 10 



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THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984—9 



Little things mal(e a difference 



Gregory Clary, director of Special Services, poses In front of the Haslceli 
IHouse, home of Upward Bound. Photo by Allison Boss 



With an enrollment twice the nat- 
ional norm, Clarion University's 
Marketing Department feels it is 
important to maintain personal 
attention to the needs of students. 

"Students are our business," says 
Dr. Josei^ Grunenwald, a professor 
of marketing. "We take the time to sit 
and listen to them. We talk about 
things students want to do or what 
they need to know. These little things 
make the difference in a successful 
department." 

The Marketing Department enrolls 
approximately 350 students or more 
than 20 percent of the enrollment in 
the College of Business Administra- 
tion, which also includes the 
Administrative Science, Accounting, 
Economics and Finance depart- 
ments. 

Tlie Marketing Department faculty 
stress the importance of making 
themselves available to students who 
need personal attention. The faculty, 
who maintain close contact with 
developments in the marketing 
world, have an average age of I^s 
than 40. Another important ingred- 
ient in the successful marketing mix 
has been the stability of the faculty 
since the department evolved from 
the Administrative Science Depart- 
ment in 1979. 

Three full professors, two assistant 
professors, and two instructors guide 
the 350 majors, but the department 
also serves other majors in the 



Haskell House works positively 



The Haskell House, located on 
Wood Street next to the Alumni 
House, is a very impoi-tant part of our 
campus. 

The Haskell House serves two im- 
portant functions: 1.) Has an Upward 
Bound program, which is found in 
many high schools, and 2.) the Spec- 
ial Services Program. 

The director of Special Services, 
Mr. Gregory Clary, has been here for 
three years. He was schooled at 
Marshall University in West Virginia 
and was an assistant director of the 
Upward Bound program at Penn 
State prior to coming to Clarion. 

The Special Services program 
worics in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity's Division of Academic Support 



Services, under the direction of Dr. 
Francine McNairy. 

TTie program is federally funded by 
the U.S. Department of Education, 
and attention is focused mainly on 
freshman and sophomore students, 
although help is available to any stu- 
dent, regardless of what year they 
are in. TTie Special Services offer a 
variety of helpful programs, includ- 
ing career planning, tutoring, course 
selection and registration, financial 
aid counseling, and personal 
counseling. The center also may 
refer a student to other programs on 
campus such as the writing center on 
the reading/study skills workshops. 

If a student feels he/she can benefit 
from these services, they can contact 



the Haskell House for more 
information or make an appointment 
to see a counselor. In some instances, 
students are referred to the program 
through their professors. 

Another service provided is for 
student's with physical handicaps. 
Tlie staff works closely with these 
students by arranging for readers, 
tutors, transportation, residence hall 
considerations, and access to special 
adaptive equipment and tapes. 

Mr. Clary summed up the goals of 
the Student Services program by 
saying: "Our purpose is to work with 
students in a positive way both 
academically and sociaUy. We try 
and make the students feel that their 
being here at Qarion matters, be- 
cause to us, it does." 



RED 



STALLION 

Site of the 

BIGGEST 
ALF PARTY 

ALL WEEKEND LONG 

No Cover!! 

D.J. Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 
NOW OPEN EVERY FRL AT 1 : 00 P.M. 

Open Noon on Sat. for Homecoming 



College of Business and the College of 
Communications and Computer In- 
formation Science. Dr. Paul Kim, 
chairman of the Marketing 
Department, estimates 500 students 
enroll in "Principles of Marketing" 
each year. 

Marketing is the process by which 
an organization discovers and adapts 
to the needs and desires of consum- 
ers, according to Kim. It is crucial to 
the success of any modem organiza- 
tion whether it is non-profit or profit 
oriented. "Rie department prepares 
students for careers in research, a- 
nalysis, planning, implementation, 
and management. 

The emphasis of the program is not 
on deep specialzation but rather on 
the development of analytical ability, 
the ability to communicate ideas, and 
adaptability to technological change. 

"Educating people for marketing 
careers is the basic philosophy of our 
department," Kim says "They will 
be ready to get professional training 
in future marketing management 
positions." 

Students are presented with op- 
portunities to role play events they 
may encounter once they graduate. 
They "play" computer simulation 
games, perform mock interviews, 
and practice salesmanship. The stu- 
dent Chapter of the American 
Marketing Association lists 150 
members. The AMA stresses the 
significance of professional conduct 



and social responsibility. 

"The students need the academic 
skills, concepts, techniques, and 
methods," Grunenwald continues. 
"But they also have to practice how 
to use them." 

The department ranked 82nd in 
number of graduates in the country 
in 1982. That, plus a good placement 
record, indicate a solid department 
and keep the students coming. 

"There are many career opportun- 
ities open to marketing students," 
says Kim. "They may work in mar- 
keting management, field 
management, purchasing, 
advertising, and non-profit organiza- 
tions. TTiere are a number of our 
graduates working in major US cor- 
porations such as Xerox and Merrill 
Lynch. Others pursue their graduate 
study at major universities." 

With a large student enrollment, 
some would say that faculty would 
not have time to directly attend to 
every student's needs. But that's not 
true, according to Grunenwald. 

"Student orientation is the main 
thing that separates our department 
from other marketing departments," 
says Grunenwald. "they know they 
can come in any time whether they 
want to talk or if they need a letter of 
recommendation. And they know 
they'll get it. After all, the kids pay 
the bill and deserve the personal 
service. If you do this, you'll be suc- 
cessful." 



ALLEGHENY WOMEN'S CENTER 

an out patient medical clinic offering 
Abortion— asleep or awake 

• Morning After Treatment 
• Birth Control 

• Related Services 

PHONE 412/362-2920 



[Allegheny 
Women s 



Medical Center East Building 
Penthouse Right (8th floor) 
211 North Whitfield Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206 



TURN US ON. . . 





MARC SHERMAN 

DJMW9a.ni.-l2p.m. 




MARGOT CALLAHAN 

UJTR»a.m.-12p.m. 

TOPS 

1. John Waite, Missing You 

2. Tlie Cars, Drive 

3. Cyndi Lauper, She Bop 

4. Stevie Wonder, / Just Called 

To Say I Love You 

5. Scandal, The Warrior 



KEVIN BROWNE 

DJW.9p.m.-Ia.m. 
K12p.m.-3p.ni^ 




90 CABLE FM 



8-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 11.1984 



Buildings on campus have real personality 



By Michele LaTour 
Features Editor 



The names of buildings on campus 
are important so that one knows 
where their home, classes or meals 
are. But what about the people 
behind the names? Their faces and 
personalities are unknown to many. 

People travel in and out of the 
campus buildings and never stop to 
think about where the name came 
from and why each building holds 
that particular name. 

Almost every building on campus 
is named after a faculty or staff 
member. Some exceptions are Car- 
rier and Founder's. 

Many of the names of the buildings 
are people who have devoted 20 
years or more to Clarion. They are: 
John Ballentine, Charles F. Becker, 
Margaret A. Boyd, Frank M. Camp- 
bell, Rena M. Carlson, Paul G. 
Chandler, William R. Egbert, 
Lorena Given, Marie Marwick, Ber- 
tha V. Nair, Donald D. Peirce, Hazel 
Sandford, Dana S. Still, Waldo S. 
Tippin, J.W.F. Wilkinson. Members 
over 30 years of dedication were: 
John Ballentine, Frank M. Camp- 



bell, Rena M. Carlson, Bertha V. 
Nair, Donald D. Peirce, Hazel Sand- 
ford, Waldo S. Tippin and J.W.F. 
Wilkinson. 

Each personality behind the build- 
ing is just as important as the build- 
ing itself. An introduction to each 
personality may shine some light 
and new respect for each of the 
buildings on the Clarion campus. 

Ballentine Hall is named after 
John Ballentine ( 1848-1934), a teach- 
er at Clarion for 37 years. He was 
also an acting principal at two 
separate times. Ballentine taught 
Ancient Languages and Historical 
Sciences. He retired in 1920. 

Ballentine Hall was completed in 
1951 containing accommodations for 
115 men. 

Becht Hall is named after George 
J. Becht (1865-1925), Principal from 
1904 through 1912. During his term, 
enrollment rose in 1911-1912 by 65 
percent. Becht left Clarion to be- 
come Secretary of the State Board of 
Education in 1912. 

Becht Hall, originally Navarre 
Hall, was erected in 1908. 

Becker Hall is named after Char- 
les F. Becker (1878-1972), a teacher 



for 24 years at Clarion. Becker 
taught Professional Education and 
was for many years director of the 
Office of Student Teaching and 
Placement. Becker is also noted as 
the founder of Ellwood City 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Marwick-Boyd, completed in 1%9, 
is actually named for two women, 
Margaret A. Boyd and Marie Mar- 
wick. Both women arrived at Clar- 
ion in 1929 and left in 1959. They 
shared a room together as residents 
of Becht Hall. 




CHARLES F. BECKER 



BERTHA V. NAIR 



I 



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Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 



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ANABEL L RALSTON 

Boyd was a teacher for composi- 
tion, literature and speech courses. 
She was also the forensics advisor, 
faculty sponsor of Panhellenic Coun- 
cil, and the advisor of Alpha Psi 
Omega dramatic fraternity. 

Marwick taught advanced speech 
courses. She was a sponsor of the 
College Players and director of all 
dramatic presentations. 



Campbell Hall was named after 
Frank M. Campbell (1911-1972). 
Campbell held many titles and jobs 
while at Clarion such as: assistant 
dean of men, head resident of Eg- 
bert Hall, member of music and so- 
cial studies department, supervisor 
of student teachers, instructor of 
French and Spanish courses and 
also, for a decade, director of Alum- 
ni Office and Editor of Alumni Asso- 
ciation Publication. Printed in the 
Clarion Call for March 3, 1972: 

If Frank Campbell gets as much 
fullness and enjoyment out of his af- 
terlife as he did out of his first, he 
will be a happy man indeed. We will 
miss him. 

Carlson Library is named after 
Rena M. Carlson. She was born in 
1898 and is still alive. Carlson was 
educated at Carnegie Library School 
of Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
Carlson left Clarion in 1963 after 34 
years of dedication to the school. 

Carrier Administration, one of the 
buildings on campus not named 
after a faculty or staff member is 
named after the Carrier family. The 
Carrier name came from Hiran and 
Nathan Carrier Jr., who were two of 
15 citizens on the board of trustees. 
They were generous contributers to 
the school. The amount is thought to 
be around $10,000. 

Chandler Dining Hall is named 
after Paul G. Chandler. He was at 
Clarion for 23 years and was 
President. Chandler was construct- 
ed in 1963. 

Davis Hall is named after Aaron J. 
Davis, who was the principal from 
1887-1902. He also taught Pedagog- 
ies, Mental and Moral Sciences, His- 
tory of Education and the Science 
and Art of Teaching. Davis was 
erected in 1936. 

Egbert Hall is named after Wil- 
liam R. Egbert, who put forth 24 
years of service to Clarion. Egbert 
was erected in 1938 and was original- 
ly a men's hall. 

Founders Hall the renamed "Old 
Science Hall", was built in 1894. The 
name was changed because Donald 
D. Peirce was named the science 
center. The rename is in the honor of 
the institution's founding fathers. 

Founders originally contained 
nine recitation rooms, science labor- 
atory, principal's office, dormitory 
rooms, organizational rooms, and 
eventually a book room and store. 

Given Hall is named after Lorena 
Given. Given gave 26 years of ser- 
see Buildings, Page 10 



$2.00 OFF 

All 1985 Calendars 

Priced $5.00 and up 

Expires October 20, 1984 



InJ^Tana-Shear 



Top stylists Rita, Cathy, Jessie, Pam, Debbie, 
Darlyne, Kathy, Lori and Mary would like to welcome 
returning friends and alumni. 
We wish everyone a safe and enjoy- 
able Autumn Leaf Festival Week. 



Tana-Shear 

_/«£ ComjiUtE j3iE.autLj c:t>aLon 

800 Center 226-8951 




tSCW INC 







THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984—9 



Little things make a difference 



Gregory Clary, director of Special Services, poses in front of the Haskell 
House, home of Upward Bound. Photo by Allison Boss 



With an enrollment twice the nat- 
ional norm. Clarion University's 
Marketing Department feels it is 
important to maintain personal 
attention to the needs of students. 

"Students are our business," says 
Dr. Joseph Grunenwald, a professor 
of marketing. "We take the time to sit 
and listen to them. We talk about 
things students want to do or what 
they need to know. These little things 
make the difference in a successful 
department." 

The Marketing Department enrolls 
approximately 350 students or more 
than 20 percent of the enrollment in 
the College of Business Administra- 
tion, which also includes the 
Administrative Science, Accounting, 
Economics and Finance depart- 
ments. 

The Marketing Department faculty 
stress the importance of making 
themselves available to students who 
need personal attention. The faculty, 
who maintain close contact with 
developments in the marketing 
world, have an average age of less 
than 40. Another important ingred- 
ient in the successful marketing mix 
has been the stability of the faculty 
since the department evolved from 
the Administrative Science Depart- 
ment in 1979. 

Three full professors, two assistant 
professors, and two instructors guide 
the 350 majors, but the department 
also serves other majors in the 



Haskell House works positively 



The Haskell House, located on 
Wood Street next to the Alumni 
House, is a very important part of our 
campus. 

The Haskell House serves two im- 
portant functions: 1.) Has an Upward 
Bound program, which is found in 
many high schools, and 2.) the Spec- 
ial Services Program. 

The director of Special Services, 
Mr. Gregory Clary, has been here for 
three years. He was schooled at 
Marshall University in West Virginia 
and was an assistant director of the 
Upward Bound program at Penn 
State prior to coming to Clarion. 

The Special Services program 
works in conjunction with the Univer- 
sity's Division of Academic Support 



Services, under the direction of Dr. 
Francine McNairy. 

The program is federally funded by 
the U.S. Department of Education, 
and attention is focused mainly on 
freshman and sophomore students, 
although help is available to any stu- 
dent, regardless of what year they 
are in. TTie Special Services offer a 
variety of helpful programs, includ- 
ing career planning, tutoring, course 
selection and registration, financial 
aid counseling, and personal 
counseling. The center also may 
refer a student to other programs on 
campus such as the writing center on 
the reading/study skills workshops. 

If a student feels he/she can benefit 
from these services, they can contact 



the Haskell House for more 
information or make an appointment 
to see a counselor. In some instances, 
students are referred to the program 
through their professors. 

Another service provided is for 
student's with physical handicaps. 
The staff works closely with these 
students by arranging for readers, 
tutors, transportation, residence hall 
considerations, and access to special 
adaptive equipment and tapes. 

Mr. Clary summed up the goals of 
the Student Services program by 
saying: "Our purpose is to work with 
students in a positive way both 
academically and socially. We try 
and make the students feel that their 
being here at Clarion matters, be- 
cause to us, it does." 



RED 
STALLION 

Site of the 

BIGGEST 
ALF PARTY 

ALL WEEKEND LONG 

No Cover!! 

D.J. Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 
NOW OPEN EVERY FRL AT 1 :00 P.M. 

Open Noon on Sat. for Homecoming 



College of Business and the College of 
Communications and Computer In- 
formation Science. Dr. Paul Kim, 
chairman of the Marketing 
Department, estimates 500 students 
enroll in "Principles of Marketing" 
each year. 

Marketing is the process by which 
an organization discovers and adapts 
to the needs and desires of consum- 
ers, according to Kim. It is crucial to 
the success of any modern organiza- 
tion whether it is non-profit or profit 
oriented. The department prepares 
students for careers in research, a- 
nalysis, planning, implementation, 
and management. 

The emphasis of the program is not 
on deep specialzation but rather on 
the development of analytical ability, 
the ability to communicate ideas, and 
adaptability to technological change. 

"Educating people for marketing 
careers is the basic philosophy of our 
department," Kim says "They will 
be ready to get professional training 
in future marketing management 
positions." 

Students are presented with op- 
portunities to role play events they 
may encounter once they graduate. 
They "play" computer simulation 
games, f)erform mock interviews, 
and practice salesmanship. The stu- 
dent Chapter of the American 
Marketing Association lists 150 
members. The AM A stresses the 
significance of professional conduct 



and social responsibility. 

"The students need the academic 
skills, concepts, techniques, and 
methods," Grunenwald continues. 
"But they also have to practice how 
to use them." 

The department ranked 82nd in 
number of graduates in the country 
in 1982. That, plus a good placement 
record, indicate a solid department 
and keep the students coming. 

"There are many career opportun- 
ities open to marketing students," 
says Kim. "They may work in mar- 
keting management, field 
management, purchasing, 
advertising, and non profit organiza- 
tions. There are a number of our 
graduates working in major US cor- 
porations such as Xerox and Merrill 
Lynch. Others pursue their graduate 
study at major universities." 

With a large student enrollment, 
some would say that faculty would 
not have time to directly attend to 
every student's needs. But that's not 
true, according to Grunenwald. 

"Student orientation is the main 
thing that separates our department 
from other marketing departments," 
says Grunenwald. 'they know they 
can come in any time whether they 
want to talk or if they need a letter of 
recommendation. And they know 
they'll get it. After all, the kids pay 
the bill and deserve the personal 
service. If you do this, you'll be suc- 
cessful." 



ALLEGHENY WOMEN'S CENTER 

an out patient medical clinic offering 
• Abortion — asleep or awake 

• Morning After Treatment 
• Birth Control 

• Related Services 

PHONE 412/362-2920 



[AUegheny 
Women s 
Center___ 



Medical Center East Building 
Penthouse Right (8th floor) 
211 North Whitfield Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206 



TURN US ON. . . 





MARC SHERMAN 

I)J .M\V!»a.m.-12pin- 




MARGOT CALLAHAN 

D.) TH!la.m.-12p.in. 

TOPS 

1. John Waite, Missing You 

2. The Cars. Drive 

3. Cyndi Lauper, She Bop 

4. Stevie Wonder. / Just Called 

To Say I Love You 

5. Scandal, The Warrior 



KEVIN BROWNE 

DJ W. !)p.m.-la.m. 
K I2p.m.-:tp.m. 



/^^ca 




'"$. 



640 AM 



90 CABLE FM 



10— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 

Buildings on campus 



(Continued from Page 8) 




FRANK M.CAMPBELL 

vice as a drawing, geography and 
history teacher to Clarion. Given 
Hall was completed in 1960 as a resi- 
dence hall for 250. 

Keeling Health Services Center is 
named after Dr. Edward J. Keeling, 



who was a college physician for 
almost 20 years. Keeling came to 
Clarion in 1931. He died in 1969 and 
the Keeling Health Services Center 
was erected in 1971. 

Harvey Hall was completed in 
1931 . The building was once the gym- 
nasium and was changed to Harvey 
Hall Student Union in 1968. 

McEntire Maintenance is named 
after Bernard M. McEntire, the 
maintenance superintendent for 40 
years. It was erected in 1970. 

Nair Hall is named after Bertha V. 
Nair (1889-1968) and was erected in 
1971 as a residence hall with a 450- 
person capacity. 

Nair was in the English faculty 
and she stayed at Clarion for 38 
years. She taught Freshman Com- 
position I and H, Literature I and H, 
Philology, Recent Trends in the 
Teaching of English and Advanced 
Composition. 

Nair was also a sponsor for a 
sorority and the press club. She was 
the advisor of TTie Clarion Call. 

Peirce Science Center is named 
after Donald D. Peirce who was the 



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Chairman of the Department of Phy- 
sical Sciences. Peirce was at Clarion 
for 36 years. 

Ralston Hall is named after 
Anabel L. Ralston (1880-1960), who 
was the Dean of Women from 1924- 
1930. Ralston was the assistant li- 
brarian before she took the position 
of dean. 

Ralston Hall was erected in 1963 as 
a residence hall for women. 

Riemer Student Center is named 
for G.C.L. Riemer. Riemer was the 
first Clarion alumnus to earn a doc- 
torate degree. 



Fewer students pay four 
year tuition lump 



Review... 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11,1984—11 



^Continued from Page 1) 



Pre-pay tuition plans are faltering 
this fall, as fewer students opt to pay 
for four years of college in one lump 
sum. 

Some administrators blame the 
drop on outside lenders who are hes- 
itant to provide financing. 



explains. "If they choose, they can 
offer a lower-than-market interest 
rate." 

With the prime inter^t rate at 
about 13 percent, Claus says, schools 
with their own funding sources can 
offer loans at 10 or 11 percent to at- 



Pre-pay plans are designed to help tract pre-pay students, 
families avoid the annual lO-to-14 
percent tuition increases of recent 
years by letting them pay all four 
years of education costs in one pay- 
ment at current tuition rates. 

But banks aren't enthused about 



Riemer (pronounced Reemer) is , ^ i, .* 
responsible for the change to the se- the plans, says John Hansen, Mar- 
„*«« „,.„*^ „* r-io-j^^ TJ!«»«ar quette University director of fi- 
nance. 



Indeed, the most popular feature 
of the ambitious "Penn Plan" is pre- 
pay tuition, offered at 10 percent in- 
terest. 

The plan, effective this fall, drew 
291 students, of which 284 chose uni- 
versity financing. 

"Financing is handled by the Penn 
Plan," explains Bill Schilling, stu- 
dent financial aid director. "But a 
bank is the lender of record." 

"At this point, we feel it's work- 
ing," Schilling says, "but I don't 
know if it's influencing anyone's 
decision to come here." 

Washington University's experi- 
ment in pre-pay tuition seems to 
support Claus's Uieory. 

liie university boasts one of the 
oldest and largest pre-pay plans in 
the country, averaging about 100 
new participants yearly since 1977. 

Participants may secure their own 
funds or borrow directly from the 
university, says John Biggs, vice 
chancelor for administration and fi- 
nance. 

Interest on a university loan is 
currently 11 percent, he adds, a rate 
tied directly to tuition and fixed 
yearly. 

"We're very happy with pre-pay," 
Biggs declares. "In fact, it's an 
enormous success. Parents and stu- 
dents love it and we love it." 

Even schools with less successful 
pre-pay plans hope to continue offer- 
ing the option. 

"As far as I know, we'll keep the 
program another year at least," 
says Santa Clara's Manriquez. 

"We'll keep our program in ef- 
fect," agrees Marquette's Hansen. 
"But we won't be promoting it." 

NEWS 
TIP? 

themselves to Clarion. '=» "^ "=*'*'^ " ^'"^ '' ''' "'" '"""^"^' "" 311 i»wC/U 



mester system at Clarion. Riemer 
Student Center was completed in 
1971. 

Sandford Art Gallery is named af- 
ter Hazel Sandford (1894-1979), who 
was for 28 years head of the Art 
Department. 

Some of Sandford's work is on per- 
manent display in the gallery. One of 
her permanent pieces is "Gloucester 
Still Ufe". 

Stevens Hall was originally a girls 
dormitory that was rechristened a 
boys dorm. Stevens was built in 1929. 

Still Hall is probably the only 
known personality on campus that is 
behind one of the building's names. 
Still Hall is named after Dana S. Still 
who recently retired in 1983. Still 
began at Clarion in 1948. 

Inside Still Hall is the Lewis Com- 
puter Center. The computer center 
is named after George R. Lewis, Di- 
rector of Computer Center. 

Tippin Gymnasium and Natator- 
ium is named after Waldo S. Tippin, 
who was a football coach. Tippin 
coached the 1952 undefeated season 
and went on to win the Lion's Bowl. 

Tippin Gymnasium was complet- 
ed m 1965. 

Wilkinson Hall is named after 
J.W.F. Wilkinson (1865-1957), who 
was Dean of Instruction and acting 
principal in 1926 and again in 1928. 
Wilkinson was also the chairman of 
tahe Mathematics Department. He 
is also noted for drawing the plans 
for Becht Hall. 

Each building has a personality 
behind it that makes it very import- 
ant and each individual whose name 
appears on the front of the building 
(kmated a very important part of 



Marquette's plan has attracted 
just 10 students since 1982. 

"We were hoping for more," Han- 
sen admits. "But it's hard to find 
banks who will cover four years of 
tuition. This puts a real crimp in the 
plan for us." 

The university's largely out-of- 
state population has difficulty secur- 
ing financing, Hansen explains, and 
Marquette has no connections with 
nationwide banks to provide uni- 
versity-backed loans. 

Other colleges are puzzled by the 
decline of pre-pay students. 

"There's no real reason why the 
number of pre-pay students is 
decreasing," insists Mary 
Manriques, manager of student 
accounts at the University of Santa 
Clara. "But this year only about nine 
students signed up. Usually, we sign 
about 15." 

Like Marquette, Santa Clara's 
plan depends on outside financing 
from local and national lenders, she 
says. 

The pre-pay decline is a mystery 
to Duke University administrators 
as well. Participation there dropped 
to 12 from last year's 24. 

Last week, university Treasurer 
Steve Harward said he didn't know 
why the program was declining. 

But schools offering college-back- 
ed financing usually fare better than 
those which leave it up to students 
and their families to secure their 
own loans, claims Frank Claus, the 
University of Pennsylvania's treas- 
urer. 

"It's an attraction when the school 
is at least a party to the funding," he 




MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SELF DEFENSE 
AND KARATE CLASSES 

Beginning on Wednesday, Oct. 17 from 

7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. 

at the 

ROSS MEIVIORIAL AUDITORIUIVI 

(Below the Clarion Library) 

Taught by Dr. C. Darrel Sheraw 

Registered Black Belt, 1st Dan 
Issliinryu (Oklnawan) Karate 

• First Class Free: No charge if you decide not to register for October. 

•Special Student Fee: Recruit another student to register with you and pay only $15.00 per 
month as long as he/she continues in the course. 

•Visiting staff of Six other Black Belts 

*Earn a Green, Brown, Black Belt: Accomplish something you'll always be proud of. 

'Faculty and staff children invited for children's "Karate Kid" classes Wednesday, Oct. 17, 
7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. 









■///y///////y///////////////////////y///y////yvy///////^////.'//^//////y.'yyyy'^^^^ 



wandering aimlessly. 

Irma Levy, as Maggie, obviouly 
possess^ the talent to play the 
complex characto* and is {^ysically 
perfect fw the role, but she and 
Copeland have made some intrinsic 
mistakes in her interpretation of the 
"Cat." Maggie's flights of fancy and 
eternal optimism have been 
mistako) for idealism - her assertive- 
ness for treachery. Maggie 
possesses no illusions about herself. 
She knows what she wants and will 
claw all the way to get them, but she 
is brutally h(mest, vibrantly alive, de- 
cidedly female. Ratho* than play her 
as the strong-minded realist. Levy 
comes across as a fading movie 
queen full of eccentricities and pecul- 
iar idiosyncracies akin to the Blanche 
DuBois character of "A Streetcar 
Named Desire." 

George Jaber, as Brick, suffers a 
similar fate. Brick is the idealist. 
He's the one who refuses to live in a 
less than perfect world. But Jaber's 
Brick is an enigma, glaring and 



hissing as if insane when emotional, 
boring instead of bored when 
emotionally detach«l. Again, the 
talent seems ^ to be there, but 
Copeland hasn't tapped it. 

Where Copeland succeeds as a 
director in the seamless blocking 
which refreshingly demonstrates 
that theatre doesn't have to be 
"stagey," and in directing himself in 
the dominant role of Big Daddy. 

Though Big Daddy is crude, garish, 
and vulgar, Copeland realizes it is his 
honesty, vitality, and ruggedness 
which lets him transcend these evils. 
Nothing is overdone in Copeland's 
performance. As it is with many of 
Williams' characters, Big Daddy 
would be easy to parody and 
trivialize, but Copeland is 
remarkable on target and his second 
act discussion with Brick remains the 
highlight of the play. 

Barb Griffin, as Mde, is incredibly 
natural and completely unselfcon- 
scious on the stage, a quality usually 
reserved for the professional theatre. 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, OCT. II 

BREAKFAST: Hard Cooked Eggs, Bacon Slices, Hot Oatmeal, Scrambled Eggs, Caramel Buns, 
Fried Potatoes, Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, Grilled Sausage Links, Bagels w/Cream Cheese. 
LUNCH: Homemade Beef Barley Soup, Split Pea Soup, Cheese Steak Hoagie, Open-Face Reuben 
Grilled, Potato Chips, Green Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef Barley Soup, ^lit Pea Soup, Veal Cutlet Parmesan, Buttered Fried 
Fish, Lima Beans, Poppy Seed Noodles, Cabbage. 
FRIDAY. OCT. 12 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Fried Eggs, Cream of Wheat, English Muffins, Fried Potatoes, 
Stewed Prunes, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, Date Nut Bread. 

LUNCH: Homemade Clam Bisque, French Onion Soup, Foot Long Hot Dog on Roll w/Onions and 
Relish, Chili Con Came, Doritos, Sauerkraut. 

DINNER: Homemade Clam Bisque, French Onion Soup, Fried Seafood Platter, (Fish Sticks, 
Breaded Qams and Shrimp), Dark Beef Stew, Hot Cinnamon Apple Slices, Boiled Potatoes 
w/Parsley Butter, Carrots. 
SATURDAY. OCT. 13 

BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Bacon, Spiced Coffee Cake, Waffles w/Hot Syrup, 
Farina, Fried Potatoes. 

LUNCH : Beef Vegetable Soup, French Onion Soup, Hot Roast Beef Sandwich, Golden Brown Wing 
Dings, later Gems, Asparagus. 

DINNER: Beef Vegetable Soup, French Onion Soup, Baked Smoked Ham, Salisbury Steak, Corn, 
Delmonico Potatoes, Cauliflower. 
SUNDAY, OCT. 14 

BRUNCH: Chilled Grapefruit Half, Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Fresh Banana, Knockwurst & Sauer- 
kraut, Home Fried Potatoes, English Muffin, Diced Peaches, Apple Fritters w/Hot Syrup, Grilled 
Sausage Cake, Blueberry Danish. 

DINNER : Greek Lemon Soup, French Onion Soup, Chicken Cacciatore, Baked Ham Loaf, Peas & 
Mushrooms, Mashed Potatoes & Gravy, Wax Beans. 
MONDAY, OCT. 15 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Farina, Bagels, Fried Potatoes, Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, 
Grilled Taylor Pork Roll, Cinnamon Roll. 

LUNCH: Homemade Minestrone, Potato Soup, Hoagie, Baked Tuna Noodle Casserole, Potato 
CSiips, Carrots. 

DINNER: Homemade Minestrone, Potato Soup, Roast Choice of Top Round au Jus, Shrimp New- 
burg over Rice, Vegetables, Potatoes, Creamed Onions. 
TUESDAY, OCT. 16 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Orange, Fried Eggs, Cinnamon Rolls, Apple Coffee Cake, Fried Potatoes, 
Chilled Fruit Cocktail, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, Hot Oatmeal. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Corn Soup, Vegetable Soup, Grilled Hamburger on a Roll with 
Sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce, Fried Fish Sandwich, Shoestring Potatoes, Com. 
DINNER: Homemade Chicken Corn Soup, Vegetable Soup, Roast Leg of Veal w/Dressing, Baked 
Lasagna, Italian Beans, Mashed Potatoes, Beets. 
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 17 

BREAKFAST: Owese (knelette, Bacon Slices, Fried Potatoes, Bluebory Sweet Roll, Apple Frit- 
ters, Fried Country Scrapple, Bagels. 

LUNCH: Philadelphia Pepperpot Soup, Tomato Soup, Ham Barbecue, Toasted Cheese Sandwich, 
Com Curls, Cauliflower. 

DINNER: Philadelphia Pepperpot Soup, Tomato Soup, Grilled Pork Chop, Braised Steak and 
Peppers, Hot Cinnamon Applesauce, Buttered Rice, Sauteed Cabbage w/Bacon. 



_^ 



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Matching Griffin in effectiveness 
are Ron Hartley and Randy Rocco, 
who manage to put depth into their 
semmingly one-dimensional roles of 
Gooper and Doctor Baugh, respec- 
tively. 

Sybil Wein as Big Mama, though 
delivering an uneven performance, 
demonstrates the character's 
shrewdness and courage perfectly 
when she finally faces the true nature 
of Big Daddy's illness. 

Peter Ojomo and Doris B. Hazzard, 
as the servants, are unfortunately on 
the stage much too little. Hopefully 
we'U see more of them in the future. 

The character of Reverend To(Aer 
is one of Williams' scathing portraits 
of petty vicioieness in the guise of 
humility, but David Knapp has 
turned him into a simplistic buffoon, 
missing the point completely. 

What happens in the play is not 
something that would normally take 
place in the course of one summw 
evening. The playwright abstracts 
his setting (not his characters!) so 
that time and space merge into a 




Cast members Barb Griffin, Sybil Wein, David Knapp, Randy Rocco and Ron 
Hartley in a scene from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." P/7ofo by Renee RosenstepI 

fixed unit. Designer Garry Copcian an aesthetic, yet unobtrusive light- 
seems to understand this fact per- ing design, 
fectly in his beautifully crafted set. By failing to realize the identifiable 
underlying the lack of sexual privacy human qualities of the, on the sur- 
and the preoccupation with sex, face, caustic characters, Copeland 



power, and money of the characters 
by placing the bed and living 
quarters of (Brick and Maggie) 
within walls which are tokenly func- 
tional as decoration. Todd Wheeler 
emphasizes the contrast between 
the cool of the moon (Brick) and the 
heat of the bedroom (Maggie) with 



has alienated his audience from 
the story. Perhaps if he had turned 
the director's chair over to a more 
objectively deft hand, "Cat on a Hot 
Tin Roof" would have hit its mark 
more directly. As it is, "Cat'' 
remains standing on a roof that 
never gets past luke warm. 



The Eagle's Den 
Intelligence Test 




1. What is a TORPIT? 

2. What are WOOD AS? 



ANSWERS: 

0S2$ ^luo joj 5iuijp umipaui b pun sauj ipu^jj 

q^iM J8gjnq8S99qD uooeq aiqnop jno si iBioads s^i^aaM siq:^ puB 

poqv ixiB8Ja ^m sjaq^O q^IMM sja^jnq aiqiiop aq; 8JB svaOOM 

UBQ s^aiSBg 8q; ^tb ispads 9uiu8A8 s,5f99M siq; si }] pue 

UMOX ui BZZld IB9H ^lUQ 9t[I SI HdHOX V 



12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 

In troducing 



By Shaun Ryan 



Doctor Ngo Dinh Tu, an active 
political science professor here at 
Qarion University, is a very inter- 
esting man to speak with. Although 
he is humble and reluctant to talk 
about himself, his views and activi- 
ties show him to be a man of depth 
and insight. 

Dr. Tu says he likes doing re- 
search. In November, he will 
(Mresent his paper on "The Presi- 
dent, Congress, and Foreign Policy" 
at the Duquesne History Forum. On 
November 15, he will travel to Bos- 
ton to present his paper on "Viet- 
nam" to the North East Pohtical 
Science Association. Then on Nov. 
20, he will be at Pittsburgh Univer- 
sity to lead a panel discussion on 
"The War Powers of the President" 
in conjunction with the PBS series 



"The Constitution: That Delicate 
Balance", under the auspices of the 
Pennsylvania Humanities Council. 

Dr. Tu came to Clarion in 1966. 
Before that, he was a diplomat with 
the government of SouUi Vietnam. 
He received his Ph.D. at Harvard 
University and was a visitor at Cam- 
bridge University in England. 

He is a popular speaker with honor 
societies and said that he likes 
"helping with honor students." He 
shows a real interest in high achiev- 
ing students and their potential. He 
said he also enjoys playing tennis. 

Next semester, he plans to teach a 
French language course with Dr. 
Gregg Lacy. This certainly illus- 
trates his versatility. 

What are Dr. Tu's ideas on the 1984 
presidential campaign? 

"I think that media has not been 
succ^sful in bringing out the is- 



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sues," he said. He stressed the 
importance of the debate between 
President Ronald Reagan and chal- 
lenger Walter Mondale. Dr. Tu felt 
that Mondale has raised issues, but 
of the president, he said, "Reagan 
projects hope, optimism and a sense 
of self confidence - which is good, but 
not strong enough." He went on to 
say that Reagan should present 
more of the issues. 

According to Dr. Tu, "If the 
Democrats don't have any success 
in the debates, it would be very dif- 
ficult to win - their only hope is the 
debates." 

When asked for his opinion of 
Geraldine Ferraro, he responded, "I 
think she's admirable in presenting 
viewpoints. Sh e's a good speaker. 
Whether she can lift the Democratic 
ticket up is another thing. I'm afraid 
that men in America may prefer 
Reagan." ^ 

He said that at this time, he felt 
that the campaign was "a good 
one." 




Dr. Ngo Dinh to be an active poiitical science professor at Clarion University. 

Photo by Mark Steele 



Novice forensic team speaks up 



By Michele LaTour 
Features Editor 



Clarion's Forwisics team partici- 
pated in the first tournament of the 
year. The tournament, "Novice" In- 
dividual Events Tournament, was 
held at Shippensburg University on 
October 6. 

The tournament, being for novice 



participants only, has no team 
award. 

There were 19 schools that attend- 
ed the tournament. 

Clarion novice speakers made a 
standing in the awards they receiv- 
ed. The rankings are: for the top 
20% of each category the Excellent 
Award; for the top 10% of each cate- 
gory the Superior Award, and the 



Classifieds 



Tlie Word of Life Pentecostal Fellow- 
ship group meets Friday at 6 p.m. 
in the Campbell Hall basement. 

Is it true you can buy jeeps for $44 
through the U.S. Government? 
get the facts today! Call (312) 
742-1142 Ext. 3701. 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,553/ 
year. Now hiring. Your area. Call 
805-687-6000 Ext. R-6334. 

FOR SALE: Records by varous art- 
ists mid thru late 70's in mint con- 
dition. Also a Sharp RT 100, $50, 



and a Sony TC-127, $40 cassette 
deck. Call Kevin at 226-3163. 

Slave days are here! Yard clean-up, 
wood splitting, storm windows 
cleaned, or any odd jobs!! $3.00 
per hour. Benefits Clarion Univer- 
sity Biology Club. Call for details 
226-2274. 

Rent a VCR and plan a party for 
only $24.95. Includes a free movie. 
VHS blank tapes $4.95 for ALF. 
Film rental club membership 
only $10. Clarion Video Center, 
226-5872, 11 S. 6th Ave. Mon.-Sat. 
12-8 p.m. and Sun. 12-5 p.m. 



third ranking style is the finalist 
placing. 

In the cat^ory of Prose, Eric 
White received the Excellent 
Award. The Duo team of John La- 
shua/Patty Miller also received the 
Excellent Award. 

In the category of Impromptu, 
Lisa Linton received the Superior 
Award. 

Finalists for the tournament from 
Qarion were: Informative, fourth 
place, Miller. A Duo fourth place 
was given to the two teams of Debbie 
Bartel/White and Lashua/Linton. 
Third place in the Duo category 
went to Miller/White. Lashua took 
first place in the category of Per- 
suasion. In the After Dinner cate- 
gory White and Miller both received 
fourth place. Bartels received se- 
cond place in the category and Lin- 
ton received first place. 

The Forensics team will compete 
again on Oct. ^21 at Clarion. 



People who start smoking at an 
early age tend to become heavy 
smokers (more than a pack a day) 
and find it harder to break the 
habit, says the American Cancer 
Society. 



Qamm tt mm ttmn Ottm^ut i m «.i>i»i fWf 

Jostens is the Official Awards Supplier of the 1984 Olympic Games 




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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984-13 



Ths Cars' HeartlMat City album it 
rank«d No. 5 on chart*. 

Photo by Mark Steele 

Cars in top five 



fly Tim Slaper 

Tlie Cars In Transition 
The rock group THE CARS seem to 
be in a musically transitional state, 
as portrayed by their latest offering. 
Heartbeat City, which holds the No. 
5 slot on the top 100 album chart. 

As the title of the album implies. 
The Cars, with Ric Ocasek (vocals, 
guitar), Benn Orr (vocals, bass), 
Elliot Easton (guitar), Greg Hawkes 
(keyboards), and David Robinson 
(drums), are breaking away from 
their late 1970's Los Angles new wave 
roots, moving towards a mainstream 
type of rock that appeals to a wider 
audience. 

Heartbeat City is a mixture of new 
wave tempo with some slower rock 
beats, displaying a large use of syn- 
thesized sound with electric guitars 
and offbeat lyrics. 

Out of the ten songs on the album, 
the tracks "Stranger Eyes," "I Re- 
fuse," Why Can't I Have You", and 
"It's Not the Night" hold the tradi- 
tional CARS upbeat, new wave 
theme, and are a consistant follow- 
up to their album. Shake It Up. 

The newer sound of THE CARS; 
However, lies in such pop-rock tunes 
as "You Might Think," "Drive," 
"Hello Again," "Magic," and the 
title track "Heartbeat aty." These 
cuts show a marked change in their 
style, but still integrate well with the 
rest of the album. 

A major factor in this evolution 
seems to have been time. Heartbeat 
aty is the first album from THE 
CARS since Shake It Up was released 
in 1961, and three years was enough 
time to observe the changing trends 
in music and furtherly develop their 
style into its present form. 

In general, it is interesting to 
observe a band make a transition in 
the source of a single album. In the 
case of THE CARS, their change has 
given them but another success. 



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Clarion grads scheduled for career day 



By Jennifer Cadek 



On Tuesday, Oct. 16, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., as part of Career Day, de- 
partment representatives will be available to discuss with CUP students the 
degree programs available here. In addition, brochures, check sheets and 
other information will be available to assist CUP students in exploring spe- 
cific majors. The location for this event is a tent to be erected between 
Tippin and Peirce (next to Parking Lot A) . In case of inclement weather, the 
displays and department representatives will be located in the Harvey Hall 
Multi-Purpose Room. 

Guest speakers, many of whom are CUP alumni, representing a wide 
range of majors and career fields, will conduct panel discussions to present 
career options for specific majors. For students about to enter the job 
market, these sessions will also provide information regarding job oppor- 
tunities. Below is a schedule listing names and professions of speakers, 

locations, and times. 

Career Day 1984 is funded by the Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Foundation, and sponsored by Career Placement Services and the Coun- 
seling and Career Planning Center. All students are encouraged to attend 
Career Day 1984! 

11 A.M. TO NOON Panel 1 - Peirce, Room 327 

Doug Kepler - Aquatic Biologist, The EADS Group, General Engineering Di- 
vision. 
Lynn Langer - Mining Specialist, PA Department of Environmental Re- 

sources . 

Leon G. Shingledecker - Doctor of Pediatric Medicine, Allegheny Pediatric 

Medical Associates 

Panel 2 Founders Conference Room, 2nd Floor 

Patricia K. Brady - Director of Admissions, Pennsylvania State University, 
New Kensington Campus . 

Joy Dunbar-Fueg - Industry/ Education Coordinator, Intermediate Unit 6. 
Cass M. Neely, Director, Upward Bound Program, Clarion University. 

Panel 3 Coffee House, Reimer 

Judy Brady - Vice President of Human Resources, Brookville Hospital. 

Joseph E. Griswold - Director of Public Works, City of Franklin 

Daniel B. Pagliari - Labor Relations Manager, Joy Manufacturing Company. 

Panel 4 Special Education Center, Room 5 

Richard H. Loeffert - Speech and Hearing Specialist, Polk Center. 
B. Dennis Shaw - Speech Pathologist/ Audiologist, Polk Center 

2:00 to 3:00 p.m Panel 5, Chapel Theatre 

R. Scott Keefer - Treasurer, Quaker State Oil Refining Corp. 
David C. Kennaday, CPA - Personnel Partner, Carbis Walker & Associates 
Diane K. Schrecengost - Manager, Health Care Specialty Dept., Price Water- 
house 

Panel 6 Founders, Room 3 

Pamela J. Huber - Education vSupervisor, Adelphoi Village. 
Mariann Luksik - Executive Director, Crawford Legal Aid Services. 
Donald McCarl - Program Director, Stairways, Inc. 
Rose Schreckengost - Clinic Manager, Family Planning Services. 

Panel ^ Becker Hall, Room 143 

Sharon Barth - Writer/Producer, KDKA Creative Services Department. 
Rose M. Kronenwetter - Business Unit Communications Specialist, Westing- 
house- Water Reactor Division. 

Panel 8 Stevens, Room 212 

Robin B. Gates - Supervisor of Curriculum & Instruction, Clarion Manor lU 
Six. 




Stop in and check out 
our luncK specials during 

AUTUMN LEAF 

HOURS: Sun.-Thurs. 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 a.m. 
Fri.-Sat. 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. 

*Remember on Tuesday to 

check out our 

NEW GIANT MEATBALL OR 

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PHONE : 

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Deborah A. King - Guidance Counselor, Upward Bound Program, Clarion 

University. 

Sandra L. Shellgren -Teacher, 2nd Grade, Oil City Area Schools. 

3:30 to 4:30 p.m Panel 9 - Becker Hall, Room 123 

Sandra L. Chitester - Senior Programmer, Quaker State Oil Refining Corp. 
Ken Kocis - Systems Coordinator, Mellon Bank. 

Michael Kronenwetter - Intermediate Systems Analyst, Blue Cross of West- 
ern Pennsylvania 

Panel 10 Still Hall. Room 104 

Barbara L. Burtell - Assistant Director, Cash Management & Investments, 

Pennsylvania State Treasury. 

Lynn E. Lineman - Assistant Manager, First Seneca Bank. 

Sheila Peoples - Credit Analyst, Liberty Mutual Insurance Company. 

Panel 11 Carlson, Room 252 

Betsy A. Fanning, Senior Information Specialist, Westinghouse Nuclear 

Fuel Division 

Ruth Williams, Head Technical Librarian, Michael Baker, Jr., Inc. 

Panel 12 Still Hall, Room 106 

Kimberly M. Claassen - Sales Representative, CBS College Publishing. 
Daniel DelBianco - Assistant Account Executive, Ketchum Advertising. 
Joy L. Lignelli - Region Employment Manager, Business Systems Group, 
Xerox Corporation. 

Listed below are Clarion majors and the panel discussions which will be 
of special interest to students in that major. The numbers next to each 
major refers to the panel discussions on the schedule. Undecided majors are 
also encouraged to attend these sessions. 

Accountancy - 5, 10; Biology - 1, 3, 8; Chemistry - 1, 3, 8; Communication 
2, 7; Computer Science - 9, 11; Earth Science - 1; Economics - 3, 5, 10, 12; El- 
ementary Education - 6, 8; Engineering - 1; English - 2, 6, 7, 8, 12; Finance - 
5-10; Geography - 1 ; Habilitative Sciences - 6, 8; History - 6, 8; 

Industrial Relations - 3; Library Science - 11; Management - 3, 10; Mar- 
keting - 12; Mathematics - 5, 8, 9, 10; Philosophy - 6; Pre-Law - 6; Pre-Medi- 
cine - 3; Psychology - 3, 6; Secondary Education - 6, 8; Special Education - 6, 
8; Speech Communication - 2, 7, 12; Speech Pathology and Audiology - 4; and 
Sociology - 6. 



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WED.: BEAT THE CLOCK 

FRI.: 25^ ALL DRAFTS 5-7 P.M. 

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• Cheapest six-packs in town 

The staff and management of the University Inn 
wish everyone an enjoyable Autumn Leaf Festival 

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340 MAIN STREET 
CLARION, PA. 

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14— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11,1984 



Lady Spikers are awesome 



By Tiki Kahle 



On Tuesday evening the Lady 
Eagles hosted Gannon University 
and the University of Pitt at Johns- 
town in a home tri-match. The Lady 
Eagles defeated Gannon in two 
games, 15-3, 15-7, and also defeated 
U.P.J, in two games, 15-4, 15-12. 

This past weekend the Lady Ea- 
gles traveled to Youngstown State 
for a tournament of Division I and II 
schools. They opened with a loss to 
Walsh College, 3-15, 3-15. Also in the 
tournament the Lady Eagles defeat- 



ed California State, 15-3, 15-9, 
Gannon University 15-12, 15-11, 
Carlo College 15-5, 15-3, and Ashland 
College 15-3, 14-16, 15-11 in the first 
round. 

In the second round they went up 
against Gannon University once 
again and won 15-12, 15-11. Next they 
played Carlow College and again de- 
feated them with the scores of 15-2, 
15-2. They then advanced to the 
semi-finals and lost to Ashland Col- 
lege with the scores of 9-15, 15-6, and 
4-15. This ended their tourney play 
with a record of six wins and two 
losses. 



Overall percentages for the tour- 
nament were serving 95%, setting 
95%, hitting 85%, receiving 80%, and 
they attempted 529 spikes. 

Two of the Lady Eagles were 
elected by the tourney coaches to the 
All-Toumey team. They were Senior 
Ellen Borowy as All-Toumey Hitter, 
and Sophomore Maureen Huber as 
an all-Tourney defensive player. 

The next home match for the Lady 
Eagles will be Wednesday, Oct. 17 at 
7 p.m. against Edinboro University 
of Pennsylvania. Come and support 
your home team! 



McFarland's/Skoal Bandits 



Lady Eagles play in weekend tourney 



The Clarion University Women's 
Softball team competed in a weekend 
tournament at Lock Haven, October 
6ti\ and 7th. Other teams competing 
were California, Duquense, East 
Stroudsburg, Onendaga College 
(New York), and the host team Lock 
Hav«i. 

Clarion took three games of the five 



they played, lost one and tied one. 
TTie Lady Eagles played three games 
on Saturday and two on Sunday, llie 
first game was against East 
Stroudsburg, which the Ladies tied 
at 4. Clarion was behind 3-1 going in- 
to the bottom of the sixth, but came 
back to tie the game. Offensively, 
the Lady Eagles had a double from 



1^ 







PIZZA HUT 

ROUTE 2 
SHIPPENVILLE, PA. 

226-5020 



Ginger Welder and a triple from De- 
nise I>oban. 

The second game was against Du- 
quense and the ladies won it by a 
score of 5-0. The game was an easy 
win and it was never close. Fresh- 
man pitcher Dana Rupert got 
the win for Clarion, while Lynn Baz- 
zoli had a double, llie Lady Eagles 
lost the third game to the host Lock 
Haven by the score of 5-3. Lock Ha- 
ven scored all their runs in the third 
inning on one hit and four errors. 
Qarion beat them offensively, the 
Lady Eagles had seven hits and LH 
only had four. Clarion won the fourth 
game against California by a score (rf 
6-1. Clarion scored in the first inning 
and just kept rolling. Lynn Bazzoli, 
Denise Doban, and Ginger Welder 
eadi had triples which contributed to 
a team batting average of .357 (10 for 
28) . TTie fifth game was also taken by 
the Golden Eagles. The Ladies 
played the team from Onendaga 
(New York) and beat them by a score 
of 6-5. The game was tied going into 
the bottom of the 7th as Doban reach- 
ed first on an error, when she stole 
second the catchers throw got past 
the shortstop and into left center field 
and Doban scored the winning run. 
Qarion held Onendaga to only three 
hits. The Lady Eagles hit 10 for 27 
with an average of .370. 



W^ 



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at Texas 
at Stanford 
at Boston (Allege 
at Brigham Young 
at Nebraska 
at Baylor 
at Ohio State 
at Alabama 
at Pittsburgh 
at Clarion 
at St. Louis 
at New England 
at Philadelphia 
at Miami 
at New Orleans 
at Atlanta 
at Cleveland 
at Kansas City 
at £)etroit 
at Washington 
at L.A. Raiders 
at San Francisco 
TIE BREAKER 
Green Bay at Denver 

__Predict winner and final score 



.Oklahoma 

.Washington 

_Temple 

.Wyoming 

.Missouri 

.Southern Methodist 

.Illinois 

_J*enn State 

_S. Carolina 

_IUP 

_Chicago 

_Cincinatti 

_Indianapolis 

_Houston 



JL. A. Rams 



JM. Y. Giants 



.N. Y. Jets 
_San Diego 
_Tampa Bay 
JDallas 



.Minnesota 
J»ittsburgh 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984-15 



This week's winner was Bud RiDenonr of Wilkinson Hall 

CONTEST RULES 

1 ) All entries must be received in the office of the Oarion Call on the Friday following publicaUon 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently enrolled at aarioa University »r be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimUies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant picking the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involving the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be Tmal. 



NAME 



ADDRESS_ 



( ; 



PHONE NUMBER 



Golden Eagles fall to Rockets 




By Mike Kondracki 

Slippery Rock chalked up 196 yards 
rushing behind running back Charles 
Sanders to defeat the Golden Eagles 
28-3 before a Homecoming crowd at 
Slippery Rock last Saturday after- 
noon. 

The Golden Eagles were plagued 
by mistakes throughout the game, 
and the game was much closer than 
the final score indicates. The Golden 
Eagles were playing without the ser- 
vices of linebacker Bob Jarosinski, 
and receiver Terry McFetridge from 
the start of the game, and to add to 
the injuries starting quarterback Pat 
Carbol was injured on the second of- 
fensive series for the Golden Eagles. 
Second string quarterback Kevin 
Hanlon was forced to enter the game, 
and he would continue to play the rest 
of the game, as Carbol could not re- 
turn. 

Clairon took the opening half 
kickoff and began play at their own 21 
yard line. After two incomplete pass- 
es by Pat Carbol, Elton Brown 
advanced the ball to the 29. The drive 
stalled there, however, as the play 
was not good enough for a 1st down 
and the Eagles were forced to punt. 
Phil Bujakowski's punt was returned 
to the Slippery Rock 48 yard line. 
From there Slippery Rock took over 
on their 1st possession. 

Charles Sanders carried two conse- 
cutive times for a gain of 7, and a 
gain of 4. Vn.e Rock's drive stalled 
here as quarterback Bill Corrente's 
next two passing attempts were both 
incomplete. Jeff Williams punt sailed 
out of the endzone and the Golden Ea- 
gles took over 1st and 10 at their own 
20 yard line. 

This series would prove costly to 
the Golden Eagles as starting quart- 
erback Pat Carbol would be injured 
on a 4th and goal play. Brown began 
the Clarion march with a 5-yard gain 
around right end. Pat Carbol then 
hit 3(Am Marshall with a pass for a 
gain of another 5 yards. Elton Brown 
carried for a gain of 9, Marshall 
carried for 3, and Brown carried a- 
gain for another 7 yards to advance 
the ball to the Golden Eagle 49-yard 
line. From there Pat Carbol com- 
pleted a 46-yard pass to Bob Green to 
the SUppery Rock 5-yard line. John 
Marshall carried for 3 more, and 
Brown carried for 1 to the 1-yard line. 
From there the Eagles were faced 
with a 3rd and one and Pat Carbol 
fumbled the snap two consecutive 
times. On the second fumble Carbol 
was sacked by Ed Roninson and in- 
jured on the play as well. Carbol was 
forced to leave, and did not return the 
rest of the afternoon. The sack ended 
the Gk)lden Eagle drive, and Slippery 
Rock took over on their own 10-yard 
line. 

Sanders then carried the ball 3 



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straight times to the Rock 19, but it 
wasn't enough for a 1st down and ther 
were forced to punt. WUliam's punt 
was taken by Mike Kuzilla and re- 
turned to the Golden Eagle 43. 

Clarion took over 1st and 10 with 
Kevin Hanlon in at quarterback. 
Hanlon's first aerial attempt was 
intercepted by linebacker Dave 
Linton at the Rock 47-yard line. 

Running back Mark Freshwater 
advanced the ball into Clarion terri- 
tory to the 49. Bill Corrente on a 
quarterback keeper gained 3, and 
Sanders carried for 5 more. Wade 
Acker carried the ball to the Clarion 
37, and Corrente hooked up with 
Acker on the next play for a 37-yard 
touchdown pass. Mike Hudak's extra 
point was good, and Slippery Rock 
had the early lead 7-0. 

Elton Brown returned the kickoff to 
the 19-yard line and Clarion began 
there 1st and 10. Brown carried two 
consecutive times to the 25, and Bob 
Green gained 4 yards on a flanker 
reverse. John Marshall carried up 
the middle for 6-yards, and Brown 
carried for 1 more. Clarion had the 
ball on their own 36 when the first 
quarter ended. 

On the first play of the 2nd quarter 
Kevin Hanlon completed a 10-yard 
pass to Marshall to the Clarion 46. 
Geoff Alexander then carried 3 



straight times to the Slippery Rock 
37, and Marshall carried twice to the 
28. From there Elton Brown carried 3 
times to the 16, but on the third carry 
he coughed up the football and 
George Yarzab recovered for 



Phil Bujakowski's punt was 
returned to the Slippery Rock 35 at 
the start of the 4th quarter, and the 
Rock took over 1st and 10. Sanders 
carried 3 straight times, and was 
dropped for a loss of 3 on the third 



Slippery Rock at their own 30-yard carry, so the Rock was forced to punt 



line. 

Sanders carried 4 consecutive 
times to the 47, and Corrente was 
sacked on the next play by Ken Ed- 
wards. Sanders carried again for 8 
yards, but it wasn't good enough for a 
1st down and the Rock was forced to 
punt. 

On the next series of downs the 
teams exchanged punts, and after a 
Qarion punt. Slippery Rock took over 
on the Clarion 46. Sander gained two 
yards on a running play up the 
middle, and on the next play Sanders 
caught a Corrente pass for a gain of 
11 yards to the Clarion 33. Tlie drive 
stalled on the next play as a Corrente 
passing attempt was intercepted by 
Sam Barbush at the Clarion 24 yard 
line. 

After two carries by Brown, Kevin 
Hanlon completed a 38-yard pass to 
Bob Green to the Slippery Rock 22- 
yard line. Eric Fairbanks was then 
called on for a 39-yard field goal with 
just :05 seconds left in the half. The 
kick was good and the half ended with 
the score Slippery Rock 7, Clarion 3. 



from their own 41. Williams' punt 
rolled dead on the Clarion 11-yard 
line, and thats where the Eagles took 
over on downs. 

Elton Brown carried for a gain of 4, 
and Hanlon completed a pass to Bill 
Frohlich to the 23-yard line. Brown 
then carried to the 34 on a draw play. 
Brown's number was called on the 
next play as well, but he fumbled the 
football and the Rock recovered on 
the Clarion 32. 

Slippery Rock wasted Uttle time in 
capitalizing on the Clarion miscue, 
and after Sanders carried two con- 
secutive times to the 27, Corrente's 
passing attempt was tipped into the 
arms of receiver Rich Cleveland, and 
the Rock advanced their lead to 14-3. 

Following the Slippery Rock 
kickoff, the Golden Eagles had 
possession of the ball on their own 28- 
yard line. Hanlon then completed two 
straight passes, one to Bob Green for 
17 yards, and one to Scott Ickes for 13 
yards. Elton Brown then advanced 
the ball from the Rock 42 to the 37 on 
a running play off right tackle. Bob 




No. 14, Doug Emminger runs into a 
few problems against the Rockets. 

Photo by Chris Zawrotnk 
Green was then interfered with on 
the next Hanlon pass by Todd 
Durand. The penalty gave the Golden 
Eagles a 1st and 10 at the Slippery 
Rock 22-yard line. Hanlon's next 
passing attempt was incomplete, and 
Slippery Rock would score one 
more time before they afternoon was 
over. After the kickoff Clarion had 
the ball on their own 47-vard Ime. The 
see Eagles Fall, Page 16 




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3 MILES FROM CLARION 

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Fri.: FisK Dinner 

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Men.: Quarter Draft 

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STUDENTS: 

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Fri., Oct. 12: Quarter Draft & Fish Dinner 

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Sun., Oct. 14: Sunday Dinner Specials 



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16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, Pa, Thursday, Oct. 11, 1984 



Senior spotlight Youn g team battles Rock 

■ ^^ - — r~" — r : — ^^ ter the match. Donent Kim 




ELTON BROWN 

Photo by Rich Herman 



By Michelle Michael 



Associated Press first team All- 
American, senior Elton Brown, is 
back in the spotlight for Clarion Uni- 
versity's football team with more 
record-breaking in this 1984 season. 

Brown, a 5'9", 185 pound tailback, 
is a healthy letterman who has re- 
turned to the Clarion team to help 
defend their PSAC Championship 
title. 

A record-holding, talented Brown 



has done it again, breaking Bill 
Wise's most rushing touchdowns 
( 19) t his season, bringing his total to 
20 rushing TD's. 

A new career rushing record is 
within the grasps of Brown, since he 
has added 282 yards this season (as 
of the California University game) 
making his new career total 2,463 
yards. Brown needs only 315 yards in 
the next six games to break Gary 
Frantz's career record (2,778). 

Brown had a record-breaking 
junior year when he became the first 
Clarion tailback to rush for over 
1,000 yards. During the 1983 season 
he ran for 1,214 yards on 231 carries, 
scoring 11 touchdowns. 

For these outstanding accomp- 
lishments, Brown was recognized by 
being placed on special teams other 
than Associated Presses All-Ameri- 
can first team. The ECAC Division 
II All-East, and the PSAC named 
Brown to their first team as a run- 
ning back. 

Brown was also named ABC-TV 
(Chevrolet Player of the Game vs. 
Slippery Rock in 1982. 

Brown, who has professional po- 
tential, can run a 4.4 second 40 yard 
sprint, and if he has a healthy 1984 
season, like the last one, Brown will 
make his marks in the Clarion rec- 
ord book and give himself an oppor- 
tunity in professional football. 



By Elaine Beach 

The Clarion women's tennis team 
started off slow earlier in last week's 
matches when they traveled to Slip- 
pery Rock, but came back with a win 
against their host Westminster on 
Thursday. 

Slippery Rock defeated the Golden 
Eagles on Monday, 8-1. Coach Nor- 
bert Baschnagel's spirits were not 
dampened by the loss. "The girls 
played good, but just not good 
enough," said Coach Baschnagel af- 



ter the match. 

The team's growing talent and en- 
thusiastic approach delivered a vic- 
tory against Westminster 5-4. Con- 
sidering they won without their 
starters including Lisa Thompson 
who is out with a knee injury caused 
in the recent tournament, the girls 
demonstrated a tremendous show- 
ing. Suzi Fritz defeated Heather 
Swank, who is the NIA All-Ameri- 
can, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4. Golden Eaglette of 
the Week, Kim Demaio played some 
of her b^t tennis crushing her op- 



ponent Kim Evan 6-2, 6-0. The dou- 
bles team of Kim Demaio and Dawn 
Funya stomped Sue Steppel and 
Debbie Potter 6-2, 6-2. 

A proud Coach Baschnagel was 
"pleased considering we were short- 
handed." The netters' overall record 
is 3-7. "The Golden Eagles are ma- 
turing slowly and continuing to im- 
prove," said Coach Baschnagel. 

The girls are competing in the 
Autumn Leaf Festival tennis tour- 
nament on Oct. 12-14 and the PSAC 
Women's State Championship on the 
19 and 20. 



Borough police make assault arrest; investigate a second report 



Harriers split Gannon tri-meet 



By David Pound 



The men's cross country team 
traveled to Gannon University Sat- 
urday in a tri-meet against Gannon 
and Slippery Rock. Clarion defeated 
Gannon 27-31, but lost to Slippery 
Rock 15-47. 

Slippery Rock featured a strong 
and well-balanced team. Dan 
McCarthy ran a record five mile 
course with a time of 26: 31, while the 
rockets also placed runners in the 
4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th positions. 

Scott DeLaney paced the Golden 
Eagles, finishing third with a time of 
27:26. Following DeLaney for 
Qarion was senior co-captain Bob 



Smith, 8th; Jim Siyder, 9th; Greg 
Garstecki, 10th; Doug McConnelU, 
nth, and Pelligrino Cicarello, 12th. 

Dave Burger placed second for 
Gannon clocking in at 26:42. Scott 
DeLaney finished third for Clarion 
followed by Bob Smith, Jim Snyder, 
Greg Garstecki, Doug McConnell, 

EaQleS fall. . . (continued from Page 15) 



and Pelligrino Cicarello, as they de- 
feated Gannon 27-31. 

On Saturday, Clarion hosts Grove 
City and Mercyhurst at Memorial 
Stadium. The event will start at 
10:30 a.m., and will also feature an 
alumni race for former Clarion 
Cross Country runners. 



Golden Eagles inserted freshman 
quarterback Doug Emminger into 
the lineup on this series. Emminger's 
first pass to Ickes fell incomplete, 
and his seccmd attempt was inter- 
cepted by Terry Wallace and the 
Rockets had the ball on their own 41. 
Williams' punt was taken at the 29- 



yard line of Clarion by Jfike Kuzilla, 
and that is where Clarion took over 
on downs. Once again Doug 
Emminger was in at the quarterback 
spot, but this time his pass was inter- 
cepted by Terry Wallace and 
returned for the final touchdown of 
the game for the Rock. 




HAVE A GREAT 

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when ordering. 

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Cheese, tomato extra and 

tax extra where applicable. 



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By Mike DiLeo/Susan Ohler 

Qarion Borough Police arrested 
George N. Trifanoff Friday, Oct. 5, 
(HI an assault charge which occurred 
in Wood Street's Presbyterian 
Church parking lot on Sunday, Sept. 
15. 

Trifannoff, a 20-year-old white 



Clarion University student and resi- Justice, Alta La Verne Hamilton and 

dent of RD 3 Qarion, was charged placed in the Qarion County jM-ison 

with attempted rape, unlawful re- pending payment of a $25,000 bail, 
straint, indecent assault, simple as- 



sault, and reckless endangerment, 
in connection with an assault on an 
unidentified female CUP student. 

He was brought before District 



According to one borough officer, 
though there have been several as- 
saults, "There have been no 
reported rapes in Clarion County 
this year." 



Borough Police are investigating a 
reported assault of a female Clarion 
student on Oct. 7 at 1 a.m. The as- 
sault, not sexual in nature, happened 
on Wood Street at Deitz Place. 

The victim said that while walking 
on Wood Street she was accosted by 
two men. One of the men, a black 



male, assaulted her with a knife 
inflicting minor injuries to her ab- 
domen. According to the victim, the 
other individual, a white male, tore 
her clothing to which she responded 
by kicking him in the groin. Tlie 
victim then fled on foot. She did not 
seek medical attention and reported 
the incident a day later. 




Vol. 56 No. 6 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



QloJOMU UiUjWAA% of PwU^^^hxU^Ulu 




SSHE Board of Governors 
adopts new allocation plan 



By Jennifer Wilson 



A ma^r change in the plan that 
allocates funds to universities in the 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE) was adopted in May by the 
SSHE Board of Governors. 

Previously, the formula used to 
determine the distribution allocation 
was based upon a "per student" ba- 
sis, without regard to certain pro- 
gram costs. The new formula analy- 
zes costs in three major categories 
and develoi^ a percentage entitle- 
ment for each university. The per- 
centage is appUed against the SSHE 
appropriation received from the 
General Assembly. The three major 
categories are: (1) instruction re- 
search and public services; (2) aca- 
demic support, student services and 
institutional support, and (3) physi- 
cal plant. 

The instruction category receives 
the largest weight with 48.4 percent. 
Differences in costs among the var- 



ious academic disciplines and stu- 
dent levels within those disciplines 
are recognized in the instruction 
category. The formula recognizes 
that teaching an upper division stu- 
dait (i.e., a junior or senior level 
student) in computer science is 
more costly than teaching English to 
a lower division student. 

Within the second major category 
of academic support, student ser- 
vices and institutional support, cost 
is linked to the number of full-time 
equivalent students at each school. 
This category, assigned a weight of 
37.5 percent, is sensitive to the num- 
ber of students served by the uni- 
versity. 

The last major category, physical 
plant, is assigned a weight of 14.1 
percent. It is concerned with each 
imiversity's maintenance. 

The development of an allocation 
formula was among the first major 
undertakings by the State System of 
Higher Education. 




Kimberiy Clarke, the 1984 Homecoming Queen, receives her crown from 
Cindy Jubach, 1983 queen. Chris Stugan, with escort Tony Pitrone, was a 
member of court vying for the crown. 

photo by Chuck LIzza, Photography Editor 




An old Rolls-Royce turns heads as It glides down Main Street Sunday afternoon. More autorama photos and ALF 
highlights on pages 8 and 9. photo by Rachel Porringer 

Chancellor explains state system- 
says student press Is important 



By Karen E. Hale 
Editor-in-Chief 



On Wednesday, Oct. 10, a press 
conference was held for members of 
the student newspapers of the 14 
state universities to meet with 
James McCormick, Chancellor, and 
staff members of the Pennsylvania 
State System of Higher Education 
(SSHE). In attendance were Karen 
Hale, editor, Mr. Art Barlow, advi- 
, sor, and Michael Downing, news edi- 
tor of llie Clarion Call. Seven of the 
14 student newspapers were 
represented at the conference. 

McCormick addressed the aud- 
ience by briefly outlining the sys- 
tem, according to Act 188, which es- 
tablished the system by a vote from 
the General Assembly of the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. McCor- 
mick said it was a new system, one 
not without its problems, and that he 
was pleased with the tremendous 
support from the campuses and the 
Harrisburg offices in the first year. 

He said Act 188 is a shared govern- 
ment approach for education, re- 
quiring the work of many people, but 
that the aim is not to build up bur- 
eaucracies in a central office. 

McCormick declared his personal 
goal to "advance this system and be 
successful advocates of the people. . 



by developing the human resources 
it has." 

Also on hand for the conference 
was Kerry Moy«r, Director of Re- 
search; Wayne Richardson, Chief 
Counsel; Wayne Failor, Interim 
Vice-Chancellor of Finance and Ad- 
ministration, and Sam Craig, 
Executive Deputy to the Chancellor. 

Moyer explained his roles in creat- 
ing new programs responsive to 
changes in education, in strategic 
development statements with which 
"we decide where we want to go" 
with the system, in pooling the re- 
sources of the universities, and in 
working with campus presidents and 
academic officers to provide aca- 
demic policy. 

Failor said his office is responsible 
for directing system policies, for the 
physical and fiscal support of the 
system and that "we exist to help 
students get the best education pos- 
sible." 

Specifically, his control is over 



cash management, determining 
financing for university buildings, 
management for building mainten- 
ance and construction, and budget 
requests. 

Failor explained that he sees most 
every piece of business for the 
system "because most everything 
has a dollar sign on it. " 

McCormick added comments 
about tuition legislation. "Our job is 
to go to the general assembly with 
workable proposals. We requested 
no tuition increases, but financial 
support slipped from 60 percent to 54 
percent which created the $45 per 
semester increase in June for Sep- 
tember. 

However, McCormick remains op- 
timistic, "There's always a tug be^ 
tween what we ask for and what we 
get, and there is criticism and dis- 
agreement with how to spend what 
we're given, but I believe there is 
great support for this system in the 

(See Conference, page 2) 



ON THE INSIDE 

Campaign '84 3 Classifieds 13 

Electionnews 5 Only at Clarion 14 

Dorm overcrowding 8 Tennis tournament ...■» 19 

ALF highlights 9-11 Football 20 



2— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 




mwm]'iw 



Another Autumn Leaf Festival has burst into beauty and. . .fluttered 
away. 

On a postcard to friends far away, one could write, "The weather 
was great. A good time was had by all," but that just wouldn't do this 
year's festival justice at all. 

The throngs of people who descended upon our tiny town were 
enough to set off the excitement. The jubilation was fueled by all the 
delicious food stands beckoning all passersby with wonderful smells. 

The parade had almost a magical sparkle to it as the autumn sun 
warmed those young and old alike under its spell, and as celebrities from 
near and far shared shiny smiles. 

Friends, parted by graduation and miles, were reunited, as others 
not in attendance were fondly remembered. 

Shopkeepers, innkeepers, craft vendors and parking lot owners all 
tallied their tills as never before, reaping the benefits of shoppers, bar- 
gain hunters and souvenir collectors swelling their markets. 

For those folks lucky enough to take part in ALP '84, and for those 
who weren't, within this issue we have tried to capture all that made this 
year's festival special. 

The faces and places of Clarion, highlighted for the week-long 
event, have been preserved in a photo essay at the center of the paper. 

Many folks were involved in the collection of the essay, but they 
would've had nothing if it weren't for all those people who put together 
this year's show, the planning for which began the day after last year's 
festival. 

Well, to all those involved, in any small way, in making nature's 
autumn art so beautiful in Clarion last week - cheers, it was spectacular! 

Karen E. Hale 
Editor-in-Chief 



tWMVMAVMAfAVM^JA^MJMMMVJJM^^^^^^ 



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mht Park . . . 

Coming soon to this page 

U^aZE to talzz a ±HoLl iktougfi 



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(ilhe Clarion Call 

\Jy Room 1 Harvey Hall 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Features Editor MICHELE UTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK. 

Pfiotography Editor CHUCK LIZ2A 



Ad Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Business Manager PHIL DONATELLI 

. Circulation Manager OENISE SHEEKY 

Advisor ART BARLOW 

Consulting Editor THERESA WAIOA 

The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads. Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Per Agate Line $ .34 



Mail Subscription Rates: 

Per Semester $5 

Per Academic Year <8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 



Opportunity available to experience Europe 



By Mike Saraka 



For those folks wondering what it 
wou Id be like to live in a European 
country, an opportunity is available 
for local students to spend four 
weeks this summer in France, Scot- 
land, or London, as part of an inter- 
national friendship and cultural ex- 
change. 

Students going to France, or 
Scotland, will spend four weeks 
living with a French or Scottish host 
family. These students will be able 
to experience their culture as part of 
a local family and not as a tourist. 

For students wishing to live in 
France, there is a one-semester high 
school study program also avail- 
able. Students applying for the 



French programs must meet the fol- 
lowing requirements: two years of 
French with a letter of recommen- 
dation from the teacher, and they 
must be 15 to 18 years old. No langu- 
age is required for the program in 
Scotland. 

The friendship and cultural ex- 
change is a joint effort between the 
United States and these countries. 
Students are selected for their 
interest in living in a new and differ- 
ent culture, their level of maturity, 
and their ability to make new friends 
and adapt to new situations, atti- 
tudes and/or values. 

The four-week London program is 
open to students ages 15-21 and has 
no language requirement. Students 
will spend the summer exploring 



Conference. . . . (continued from page 1) 



assembly; we are accepted and re- 
spected officials." 

McCormick emphasized through- 
out the conference that the system is 
an advocate of high quality, low cost 
education. 

Of the student press, McCormick 
said his personal role is to "be sup- 
portive, always available, but never 
interf erring." 

"You are the prime source of com- 
munication between the system and 
the students, which is very import- 
ant," added McCormick. 

Richardson, attorney for the 
chancellor, board of governors and 
presidents, fielded the question 
about the student press by saying, 
"For a free society, a free press is a 
king pin and an academy flourishes 
on freedom of expression." 

As for reporting on administrative 
and campus activities (particularly 
negative ones), Richardson said, 
"We can't muzzle student newspa- 
pers." 

He strongly suggested the press 
always be extremely responsible in 
reporting potentially troublesome is- 
sues and take preventive measures 
by getting two reliable sources and 
all the facts you can. 

A final segment to the conference 
was a discussion with Conrad Jones, 
director of Equal Educational Op- 
portunity, about minority recruit- 
ment. 

Jones said increased enrollment of 



black students, retention of black 
students, recruitment and employ- 
ment of black instructors, and the 
enhancement of Cheyney are his tar- 
geted tasks for the system. 

He explained that 39.4 percent 
total increase of black student 
enrollment was the goal for 1983. 
Jones said he is not satisfied with re- 
cruitment because seven of 13 uni- 
versities failed to meet their goals 
for fall 1983 and he expects many de- 
ficiencies for 1984. 

Jones believes the system's re- 
cruitment efforts have been hurt by 
Perm State, "who discovered some- 
where out there are black students 
who aren't athletes." 

"They (PSU) can meet many or 



London, getting to know its people, 
and meeting other students from the 
United States, England, and other 
countries. 

They will stay at the International 
House in London which has many 
activities to participate in. The 
Queen Mother of England is the 
patron of International House. 

Students participating in any of 
these three programs should be good 
representatives of their school, their 
community and most of all their 
country. They are considered 
goodwill and friendship ambassa- 
dors of the United States. 

Anyone interested in applying 
should contact Bendall International 
at 11650 River Moss Road, Cleve- 
land, Ohio 44136. Or phone (216) 238- 
3711. 



all of a student's financial needs and 
in some cases provide immediate 
acceptance, and we (SSHE) can't do 
that," said Jones. 

"Some schools (in the system) 
have bad reputations and the mes- 
sage has gone back home. This is 
years of damage not easily remed- 
ied," said Jones, "and there are no 
generic solutions because the institu- 
tions are different, but we're going 
to keep at it." 

And as Jones and the other staff 
members are concerned about the 
integrity of the system, so is 
McCormick, who stated, "This is 
your state system. . .we do every- 
thing we can to make improve- 
ments." 



Bookstore trivia winners listed 



The Book Center has announced 
its Trivia Contest winners through 
October 11, 1984. The following peo- 
ple will qualify for the QUIZ OFF to 
be held in Reimer Center sometime 
early in December: 

Thomas Lofquist, Kristopher 
Eshghy, Sue Rhea John Claus, Lynn 
Hawley, Butchie Marinelli, Daniel 
Slaughter, Bruce Jones. 

The winner of the QUIZ OFF will 
receive one semester's worth of free 
books. Look for the trivia qu^tion 
each day from 11-2 in the Bookstore 
window facing Wood Street. The 
contest will continue through Nov. 



30, 1984. Daily prizes will be given 
for correct answers. Daily wiimers 
will also qualify for the QUIZ OFF. 




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THE CU^RiON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984—3 



By Michael J. Downing 



Walter Mondale promises to make 
changes if he is elected Presidrat. 
He and Ronald Reagan have views 
that are at extremely opposite poles 
regarding the future of the United 
States. They hold differing views on 
such subjects as abortion, taxes, 
social security and education. How- 
ever, to develop programs and make 
changes, Mondale must sell these 
issues to Congress. 

If Mondale is elected will he be 
able to implement his prc^rams? 
The Carter-Mraidale administration 
was probably the most stagnant ad- 
ministration in modem political his- 
tory. Granted, Mondale was vice- 
presidrat and less responsible for 
the passage of bills than Cartor was, 
but it still is a reflection of the job 
they did while in office. 



Ronald Reagan was put into office 
in 1^0. Within two years he had 
more bills through Congress than 
any previous president. He made 
promises that, when implemented, 
had varying effects upon us as a na- 
tion. But the important point here 
was that he got them through the 
legislature. Such are the advantages 
of being an actor. Reagan has 
charisma, he is convincing and he is 
able to sell his administration's 
ideas to Congress. 

Once again the candidates exhibit 
their opposing political and personal 
toidencies. The choice between the 
two is a very difficult one. It seems 
to be one extreme or the other. 
Again I stress the need that exists 
for student involvement and diverse 
knowledge. 

Make yourselves concerned, after 
all, your life is in their hands. 



Nation's public school system 
to experien ce future revision 

Bv Karen A Bauer the NEA attended the association's ers should be hired. To 



By Karen A. Bauer 

The National Education Associa- 
tion (NEA) ha^ declared that they 
will work toward revising the 
nation's public school system. They 
feel the first step to accomplishing 
this is to replace President Reagan 
with presidential candidate Walter 
Mondale as President of the United 
States. 

NEA President Mary Hatwood Fu- 
trell is optimistic about the NEA's 
plans. "This restructuring for 
tomorrow must start today. . .that's 
why we're urging community and 
educational leaders to join us now in 
creating a specific plan for restruct- 
uring the schools — a plan that will 
spell out how students should be 
taught, what technologies will be 
needed, and how schools should be 
staffed." 

Approximately 7,000 delegates to 



Governor passes legislation 
to reclaim strip mine lands 



Gov. Dick Thomburgh this week 
announced that he has signed into 
l^w Senate Bill 1309, which amends 
the Surface Mining Conservation 
and Reclamation Act to encourage 
remining and reclamation of more 
than 100,000 acres of scarred and 
abandoned strip mine lands in the 
Conunonwealth. 

Calling it "both an environm«ital 
and energy tM-eakthrough," Thom- 
burgh said the act is an imporatnt 
step in the Commonwealth's efforts 
to reform state and federal laws and 
regulations that presently discour- 
age full development of coal resour- 
ces and maximum reclamation (rf 
abandoned areas. 

Thomburgh stressed the new 
law's potaitial impact on improving 
rivers and streams in the Common- 
wealth. "Acid mine drainage and 
siltation from abandoned mine 
lands, the main source of water pol- 



lution in Pennsylvania, affects more 
than 2,500 miles of our surface wa- 
ters. This law could help upgrade as 
much as a fifth, or 500 miles, of those 
polluted waterways," he said. 

"With federal concurrence, this 
law will provide an incentive for coal 
(^rators to use modem techniques 
to retrieve the 300 millions tons of 
coal left in the ground as a result of 
inefficient mining practices in the 
past," said Thorabiugh. "As they do 
so," he added, "lands left environ- 
mentally scarred by more than a 
century of mining will be reclaimed 
at no cost to the taxpayers, and our 
limited federal and state funds can 
be devoted to restoring those aban- 
doned mine lands that lack any coal 
reserves," Thomburgh said. 

The amendments to the Surface 
Mining Conservation and Reclam- 
ation Act would permit mining of 
abandoned mine lands as long as 



operators do not create additional 
pollution. Where water quality de- 
teriorates as the result of the new 
mining operation, the operator 
would be required to treat the water. 

The mining industry has been re- 
luctant to mine these areas under 
existing laws, because operators 
have been deemed r^ponsible for 
cleaning up all pollution, past and 
present. 

Under the new amendments, op- 
erators are required to attempt to 
repair past environmental damages, 
but total success is not mandatory. 

"This law removes at least the 
state regulatory impediments to 
merging our twin goals of remining 
and reclamation," Thomburgh said. 

"We now will be seeking the fed- 
eral legislation necessary to remove 
similar barriers impoi^ at that 
level," he added. 



Minorities are eligible for 
communication scfiolarships 



In conjunction with Higher Edu- 
cation WeeklOct. 13-20), the CoUege 
and University Public Relations As- 
sociation of Pennsylvania 
(CUPRAP) has announced its third 
annual Minorities in Communica- 
tions Scholarship Program. 

Two $500 scholarships will be 
awarded in mid-December to minor- 
ity students majoring in a communi- 
cations field such as journalism, 
broadcasting, English, speech, pub- 
lic relations, mass communications, 
^c. 

"The scholarship program sedcs 
to draw the attention of promising 
minority students to college and uni- 
versity public relations as a poten- 
tial career field," said Roger Wil- 
liams, acting director of public 
information at Penn State Univer- 
sity and chairman of the scholarship 
committee. 

"Since many public relations pro- 
fessionals have a degree in com- 
munications, we're looking for 
talented minority students who are 
majoring in an appropriate field." 

Applicants for a 1984-85 Minmities 
in Communications Scholarship 
must have successfully completed 



their freshman or first year at an 
accredited college or university — 
two-year or four-year, public or pri- 
vate — in Pennsylvania . 

They must also be enrolled as a 
full-time degree-seeking undergrad- 
uate in a communications major. 

The scholarship will be awarded 
on the basis of both merit and fi- 
nancial need. Interested students 



are required to submit an applica- 
tion, a transcript, and a reconunen- 
dation from a faculty member by 
Dec. 3, 1984. 

To get an ai^lication, students 
should contact the office of public 
relations at their institution or write 
to: Minorities in Communications 
Scholarship, CUPRAP, 800 North 
Third St., Harrisburg, PA 17102. 



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the NEA attended the association's 
annual meeting. In attendance was 
Walter Mondale who promised to 
"lead a renaissance" in education if 
elected as President. Also at the 
convention, NEA Executive Dr- 
rector, Don Cameron, called on 
NEA's 1.7 million members to 
support Mondale in the Presidential 
elections in November. The dele- 
gates also approved of the American 
Defense Education Act and a federal 
statute guaranteeing collective bar- 
gaining rights for public school and 
college employees. 

The NEA established a task force 
last year to report on educational 
facilities and educational reform. 
They developed some recommen- 
dations that have formed the basis of 
the NEA's official poUcy. Some of 
these include the idea that schools 
should serve all persons from the 
ages of four to adult, that students 
should master' their subjects, as 
exposed to merely receiving a pass- 
ing grade and only the finest teach- 



ers should be hired. To guarantee a 
"competent teacher in every class- 
room," they suggest all schools en- 
act "a rigorous personnel evaluation 
system for practicing teachers and 
set the "minimum salary of teach- 
ers at $24,000 a year to make teach- 
ing competitive with other 
professions that require comparable 
training and responsibilities." 

The NEA has also developed some 
programs to further improve and 
strengthen the educational system. 
They plan "to launch a teacher edu- 
cation program on child abuse and a 
teacher information program in- 
tended to help locate missing chil- 
dren." They intend to improve the 
quality of instructional software 
with the help of the Control Data 
Corporation, an intemational com- 
puter and financial services firm. 
The NEA will also spend $1.5 million 
on a network television advertising 
campaign conceming teacher's con- 
tributions to excellence in education 
to be aired this fall. 



Small Business Center 
hosts DuBois conference 



The Small Business Development 
Center (SBDC) of Clarion Univer- 
sity will host a conference titled 
"Tax and Legal Aspects of Small 
Businesses" Wednesday, Oct. 24, at 
the Sheraton Motor Inn of DuBois. 

The purpose of the conference is to 
assist small business persons as well 
as persons thinking of starting a 
small business in planning for tax 
compliance as well as informing 
them of the legal implications of 
each business structure. 

John Eichlin, Attomey at Law; 
Jeffrey Eicher, Attomey at Law, 
CPA, and Mary McKissick, CPA will 
be the featured speakers. 

The conference is scheduled to 
begin at 9 a.m. with a conference 
registration/check-in and continue 



through '2: 15 p.m., with closing re- 
marks by Dr. Woodrow W. Yeaney, 
director of the SBDC. A $20 regis- 
tration fee includes coffee and dough- 
nuts, lunch at the Sheraton and a 
packet of informative brochures. 

To register for the conference, 
registration fee checks should be 
made payable to Clarion University 
Foundation and mailed to the Col- 
lege of Continuing Education, 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania, 
Qarion, PA 16214. Further infor- 
mation or a brochure for this con- 
ference may be obtained by contact- 
ing the SBDC at 814-226-2060 or visit- 
ing the DuBois Chamber of Com- 
merce Offices at 71 Beaver Drive, 
DuBois, PA 16214. 



CURION 

40 S. SIXTH AVENUE 




226-7970 

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4-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA. Thursday, Oct. 1B, 1984 

Biology Club travels 
south to Virginia 



By Lisa Capello 



On Oct. 25-28, the Biology Club will 
be traveling to Virginia to visit As- 
sateague National Seaport. During 
this time the students will tour sev- 
eral museums, nature programs, 
ecological areas, a marine science 
center, and NASA's Wallop Island 
Station. 

Any student interested in the Bio- 
logical Sciences is welcome to join 
the club. The club's activities in- 
clude one meeting per month, work- 
ing on the Rutherford ski/nature 
trail, and one major and minor trip 
per semester. Another activity in- 
cludes the guest speaker program. 



In the past, speakers have discussed 
such topics as falconry, Ichtyology 
(the study of fish) and African ani- 
mals. During the program the ani- 
mals are presented in the room. If 
not, a film or slide show about the 
subject is viewed. Afterwards, re- 
freshments are offered and addition- 
al questions by students are ans- 
wered by the program speaker. 

Anyone interested in joining the 
Biology Club is to contact Dr. Dalby 
or go to room 242 in the Peirce 
Science Center. The next meeting 
will be held on the first Monday in 
November and future notices about 
the meeting will be posted. Every- 
one is welcome. 



Software engineering 
institute pianned iocaliy 



By Jim Pablo 



Gov. Dick Thornburgh and 
members of the Pennsylvania Con- 
gressional delegation joined forces 
in support of winning a $103 million 
contract to establish a new Software 
Engineering Institute (SEI) in 
Western Pennsylvania. 

"Establishing this innovative lab- 
oratory can be important not only 
for the economic benefits and jobs it 
would provide for our working men 
and women, but also because it 
would further enhance our growing 
reputation as a state receptive to 
advanced-technology enterprises , ' ' 
Thornburgh said. 

"However, a facility of this type, 
which holds the potential to spin-off 
other firms and industries, will not 
be realized without a concerted ef- 
fort at both the state and federal 
level. To support this effort, I am 
offering the assistance of my ad- 
ministration to acquire state financ- 
ing for the project." 

Carnegie-Mellon University 
(CMU) is one of several institutes 
competing for the Department of 
Defense contract, which will 
improve computer reliability for the 
federal agency. CMU is widely rec- 
ognized for its expertise in com- 
puters and is considered as a na- 



tional resource for software en- 
gineering. 

The SEI would develop software 
standards and procedures and help 
spread software technology to the 
Department of Defense services, 
agencies, and industrial contract- 
ors. SEI would also lead the mili- 
tary's efforts in improving software 
production and developing more re- 
liable computer systems. 

In addition to helping finance a 
permanent facility Thornburgh 
said a joint research and develop- 
ment funding would be available un- 
der the state's Ben, Franklin Part- 
nership program. The Western 
Pennsylvania Advanced Technology 
Center was established under this 
program. Because of the importance 
of the project to Pennsylvania six of 
the Ben Franklin Partnership uni- 
versities, as well as the Business 
Council of Pennsylvania, are sup- 
porting the project. 

Plans for the facility to be built is 
late 1984 by the Department of De- 
fense. A full complement of 250 
computer scientists, technicians and 
support staff is expected to be work- 
ing at the institute within five years. 
If CMU is selected as the SEI site, 
temporary facilities in Pittsburgh 
would start a staff of 80, while CMU 
could begin building a new facility. 




The Dance Extension performs Tuesday, Oct. 23 at 8:15 p.m. In Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. Here they are pictured in 
a scene from their performance. Ali students are invited to attend. 

Clarion hosts Collegiate Choral 
Festival later this month 



The Pennsylvania Collegiate 
Choral Association will hold its an- 
nual Permsylvania Collegiate Choral 
Festival at Clarion University Oct. 
25, 26, and 27. 

Approximately 169 students and 
their choral directors representing 
22 colleges and universities through- 
out Pennsylvania, including Clarion 
University, will be attending the 
three-day festival. The Clarion Uni- 
versity choir will host the prestig- 
ious state event for the first time in 
its history. 

Culmination of the festival will be 
a Festival Concert to be presented 
Saturday, Oct. 27, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium. Tickets, 
which will be available at the door, 
are $2.50 for adults, $1 for children, 
and free admission for Clarion Uni- 
versity students with a valid I.D. 
card. 



"These students will have a very 
busy and intense rehearsal sched- 
ule," says Milutin Lazich, director of 
choirs at Clarion University. "For 
the three days they will be involved 
in singing through a selected pro- 
gram of outstanding choral music 
under the direction and leadership of 
an outstanding choral conductor." 

Dr. Robert Page, assistant con- 
ductor and director of choruses of 
the Cleveland Orchestra and music 
director of the Mendelssohn Choir of 
Pittsburgh, will serve as guest con- 
ductor of the festival. Page is re- 
garded as one of the most distin- 
guished choral conductors in the 



country. 

"While most of the preparations 
for the festival are moving well on 
schedule, one problem still re- 
mains," says Lazich. "Namely, the 
problem of housing so many stu- 
dents. Many families from the Clar- 
ion community have already shown 
their generosity by their willingness 
to house these students. However, 
there are still a number (A students 
who need to be housed. Anyone will- 
ing and able to help is kindly re- 
quested to contact myself at the 
Clarion University Music Depart- 
ment at 226-2384 or 226-2287 or in 
room 230 of the Marwick-Boyd Fine 
Arts building." 



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The Autumn Leaf Fostivai was a success once again this year. Here a father 
and son enjoy the warm sunshine and the excitement of the ALF Parade. 



Wachob criticizes military budget 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984—5 



By Mike DiLeo 



"Die U.S. Senate passed a bill creat- 
ing a wilderness area in the Allegh- 
eny National Forest, thus ending six 
years of work by U.S. Rep. William 
F. Clinger., Jr., (R- Pa) to create 
Pennsylvania's first wilderness area. 

"It's a great feeling," said Clinger 
upon hearing of the Senate action. 
"This issue has been ongoing for 
eleven years and I have worked on it 



for the past six. It seems like it's been 
forever." 

The bill, which has already passed 
the House, goes back to the House for 
approval of some minor changes be- 
fore going to the President for his 
signature. 

Tlie Pennsyvania Wilderness Act 
designates nearly 10,000 acres of the 
forest to be protected as wilderness, 
and another 23,000 acres would 
become a National Recreation Area. 



The wilderness bill was introduced 
in the House by Clinger back in 
March and received the support of 
the entire Pennsylvania congression- 
al delegation. 

Clinger said the bill would give the 
U.S. Forest Service a mandate to 
manage the vast resources of the 
Allegheny National Forest "so that 
millions of Americans and their 
children can look forward to years of 
enjoying the beauty of the forest." 



dinger's efforts on wilderness 
bill prove to be effective 




i; 



tm^ 




BILL CLiNGER 



Clarion Call file photo 



State Representative Bill Wachob, 
a Democrat from Elk and Clearfield 
counties, criticized the latest mil- 
itary budget proposal introduced to 
Congress by Defense Secretary 
Caspar Weinberger. 

Wachob said the military budget 
reductions proposed to Congress 
would be obtained almost entirely by 
delaying scheduled purchases of 
conventional weapons. Major strate- 
gic weapons such as the MX missile 
and the B-1 bomber would be left 
intact. Also untouched by budget 
cuts would be funding for a research 
program on space-based antimissile 
weapons. 

Wachob, a candidate for Congress 
in the 23rd District, has campaigned 
against both the MX and the B-1. He 
believes that U.S. strategic interests 
around the world are better protect- 
ed by conventional weapons. 

Rep. Wachob said that a top-heavy 
nuclear arsenal would contribute to 
international instability and could 
lead to the United States seriously 
considering 'first use' of nuclear 
weapons. To support his views, 
Wachob added, "When our nuclear 
weapons become our only option, 
that is not much of an option." 

If elected to Congress, Repre- 
sentative Wachob said he would 
support production of high technol- 
ogy that would make use of nuclear 
weapons "unnecessary and avoid- 
able." 




y 



BiLL WACHOB 



Clarion Call file photo 



Dr. Callay's book review 
to air on Channel 5 



Dr. Brigitte Callay, associate pro- 
fessor and chairperson of the De- 
partment of Modern Languages and 
Cultures at Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, will review the book 
The World Challenge by Jean- 
Jacques Servan-Schreiber, on TV 
channel 5 on Thursday, at 10:30 
a.m., Friday at 6:30 p.m., and 
Monday at 5:30 p.m. 

Servan-Schreiber's book considers 
the oil politics of OPEC, the African 
raw materials challenge, and the 
Japanese conquest of the world mar- 
ket through the computer revolution, 
challenges to which the industrial- 
ized nations must respond for their 
own survival. 

This series of book reviews is un- 
der the auspices of Carlson Library. 
Nancy McCullogh, a student, is in 
charge of production of these book 



reviews. 

Dr. Callay, a native of Belgium, 
has advanced degrees from univer- 
sities in Belgium and the United 
States and has taught in Belgium 
and the United States. 



Be sure to catch the 
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Balka receives English award • We Grant Your Requests 



By Susan Ohler 



Leigh Backa, a junior majoring in 
English here at Clarion, recently re- 
ceived the Eastern Association of 
Pennsylvania State Universities 
(EAPSU) Award. The award is 
given to the outstanding English 
major at each of the 14 state uni- 
versities. 

After being selected by the faculty 
to receive the award, Leigh traveled 
to Shawnee on the Delaware, Penn- 
sylvania to EAPSU Teacher's Con- 
ference on Sept. 21 and 22 to accept 
her honor. At the conference, Leigh 
met other dedicated English majors 
\^ch, acc(N*ding to her, ". . .brought 
different meaning to Uie major. It 
gave it (the major) a new impor- 
tance." 

At the conference, lecture were 
given on writing programs and lit- 
erary topics. Dr. Dennis, from the 
CUP English Department, present- 
ed a paper concerning the western 
"The Searchers" titled "Searching 
the 'Searchers'." 



Leigh feels that there is a good 
English program at Clarion and it is 
comparable to other state universi- 
ties. 



Presently, Leigh wants to obtain 
her Master's degree in English and 
some day work in a publishing com- 
pany. 



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lA/CCe \Nou\(i like to 
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THANKS to Eccles 
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6-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 18, 1984 



National student voter drives successful 



By Susie Goldberg and David Gaede 

Over 400 students poured through 
voter registration lines at Boston 
College on Oct. 1, joining thousands 
of others on campuses across the 
country that held mass registration 
drives in observance of National Stu- 
dent Registration Day. 

Statewide, Massachusetts colleges 
registered nearly 3,500 students dur- 
ing the one-day event, reports Jim 
Kessler with the Massachusetts 
Public Interest Research Group (M- 
PIRG), one of several student or- 
ganizations sponsoring national 
drives to register students. 

There were similar efforts at cam- 
puses nationwide last week as or- 
ganizers capped what they're 
calling "the most ambitious stiKlent 
voter registration drive in history." 

It was mounted, moreover, in the 
midst of a presidential campaign 
that has failed to excite much 
campus interest. 

In New Jersey, the four Rutgers 






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campuses alone netted nearly 2,500 
new student registrants. 

At the University of Oregon, 
where the governor proclaimed Oct. 
1 state student registration day as 
well, over 2,500 joined voter lists. 

Students at 6)sumnes River Col- 
lege in California held a Micliael 
Jackson lip-syncing contest to entice 
their classmates to sign up at on- 
campus registration booths. 

At Temple University in Phila- 
delphia, student organizers even 
passed out voter registration forms 
in classes. 

"The student vote is very import- 
ant, and the big push is on now for 
students to get out and vote," says 
Greg Moore, president of the U.S. 
Student Association (USSA), 
another sponsor of the 1984 student 
vote effort. 

"Right now there are 12 million 
college students," he notes. "In 1982 
only 48 percent of students were reg- 
istered and only 24 percent turned 
out to vote. We're trying to double 
those figures." 

By election day, Moore hopes the 
national student vote campaign will 
have over six million students reg- 
ist«^ and ready to go to the polls. 

Since last spring USSA, the coali- 
tion of campus-based Public Interest 
Research Groups (PIRGs), the 
College Democrats, and the Young 
Republicans have all been conduct- 
ing ambitious drives to get students 
registered and to the voting booth. 

All in all, over 750 campuses have 
held student voter registration ac- 
tivities over the last several months. 



sources report. National organizers 
are working directly with over 1,000 
campuses to plan additional events 
before the election, they add. 

"This is definitely the most am- 
bitious student voter registration 
project in history," boasts Kirk 
Weinert, publications director for M- 
PIRG, which is coordinating the 
combined student vote movement. 

Confusing and often antagonistic 
local election laws have hindered 
registration efforts on some cam- 
puses, and logistical problems some 
times have muddled organizers' 
abilities to coordinate the vote drive 
on a national level. 

Nevertheless, more students prob- 
ably are registered now than for any 
other election, Weinert speculates. 

TTie effects, he adds, could be 
"revolutionary." 

But while thousands of new stu- 
dents are registered, getting them to 
the polls remains a challenge in a 
presidential race that isn't exactly 



exciting student voters. 

While Presidrat Reagan has man- 
aged to evoke some passionate 
campus support and gain leads in 
polls of student presidential prefer- 
ences, the fiery support attracted by 
the earlier candidacies of Jesse 
Jackson and Gary Hart is absent, 
observers concede. 

At predominantly-black Xavier 
College in New Orleans, for in- 
stance, student excitement has 
dropped "to a definite degree" since 
Jackson visited last spring and led 
busloads of students to register. 

Jackson performed similar feats 
last fall at Tuskegee Institute and 
Mercer University. Just last week, 
he made oithusiastically-welcomed 
registration stops at several 
Maryland campuses. 

But such visits are rare these 
days, so student vote organizers say 
they appeal more to students' sense 
of civic duty than to impassi(Hied 



suiHport for the candidates to get stu- 
dents to the polls. 

Students will vote on issues, not 
people, M-PIRG's Weinert says. 

Consequently, "the next big push 
is to educate the voters on the issues 
and why it's important for them to 
get out and vote." 

To pique students' interest, vote 
organizers are planning a "Show- 
down '84" debate on many campuses 
following the second television de- 
bate between Reagan and Mondale 
on Oct. 21, Weinert says. 

Students will assemble to watch 
the debate, and afterward will 
conduct their own local debates in- 
volving students, politicians, com- 
munity leaders, faculty and admin- 
istrators. 

"Student turnout has been pretty 
low in the past," Weinert observes. 
"So to make sure they get out to vote 
we'll be conducting phone cam- 
paigns, dorm sweeps and leafletting. 



Reagan Increases number of 
foreign youth exchanges 



What is it? rector of the United States Informa- 

A decision by Presidait Reagan, tion AgMicy (USIA) as his personal 



announced on May 24, 1982, to in- 
crease the number of youth ex- 
changes (ages 15-19) between the 
United States and the following 
countries: Canada, Federal Repub- 
lic of Germany, France, Italy, Uni- 
ted Kingdom, and Japan. President 
Reagan named Charles Z. Wick, Di- 




representative for the Initiative 
\^ich will begin to expand to addi- 
tional countries in 1984. 
Why is it important? 

The Initiative, which comes at a 
time when int^Tiational ^ucation 
involving American youth is de- 
clining, reflects the belief of the U.S. 
that exchanges of young people are 
perhaps the best-long range means 
to ensure close relations and mutual 
understanding among the "succes- 
sor generations." 
How will it work? 

The Initiative is a cooperative un- 
dertaking between the U.S. Govern- 
ment and the private sector. 

USIA is providing grants to Amer- 
ican not-for-profit exchange organ- 
izations which have a demonstrated 
track record of experience and pom- 
petence in selecting host families for 
foreign visitors and young people for 
overseas programs. These funds en- 



Help bring the world together 
Host an exchange student 

As part of International %uth Exchange, a Presidential 
Initiative for peace, your family welcomes a teenager from 
another country into your home and into your way of life. 

\blunteer host families from all segments of American 
society are being selected. If youd like to be one of them, 
send for more information. 

Help bring the world together, one friendship at a time- 




YOUTH EXCHANG; 




tt«tc: VrK'TH KXCHANGE 
Pueblo. Colorado HI009 



A messafje fnHn The Advertising Council and The International Youth Kxchange 



nance the capability of those organ- 
izations to administer more youth 
exchanges. Programs range in 
length from four weeks to one year 
and include business internships, 
programs for young workers, 
summer cultural programs, in addi- 
tion to year-long academic pro- 
grams. 

Private sectCH* cooperation, in the 
form of financial and oth^ volun- 
tary support (such as American host 
families for the foreign students), is 
crucial to the success of the Initia- 
tive. A President's Council, made up 
of top corporate executives across 
the country under the chairmanship 
of Coy Eklimd, Chief Executive Of- 
ficer of the Eiquitable Life Assur- 
ance Society, has been formed to en- 
courage such private sector support. 
How can citizens participate? 

Families inter^ted in hosting a 
foreign student, and students inter- 
ested in exchange programs should 
write to: Youth Exchange, Pueblo, 
Colorado 81009. 



SPECIAL DIAMONDS 




FANCY CUT DIAMONDS OFTEN COST MORE 

THAN ROUND ONES. ITS SAD BUT TRUE. THESE ARE 

BEAUTIFUL EXCEPTIONS AND EXCEPTIONALLY 

BEAUTIFUL. VISIT US NOW. WE HAVE A 

CONSIGNMENT OF SPECIAL DIAMONDS 

AT VERY SPECIAL PRICES. 



.90 CT. $1 490 1 .25 CT. $2,480 .36 CT. $795 

JAMES JEWELERS 

DOWNTOWN CLARION 

USE OUR LAY-AWAY 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18. 1984-7 



Dominick Labino (right) points out and txplalns a plec« of his work to Mrs. 
Bond. His wori( was on dispiay aii during ALF wMk. photo by Bill Alberter 




This old Ford and many likt It vieie uii ciit^piay Sunday on Main Strest as 
the Autumn Leaf Festival came to a close. This old hand-crank engine cer- 
tainly is a reminder of days gone by. 

photo by Chuck LIzza, Photography Editor 



DITZ'S 

(Next to Post Office) 



DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING EARLY 

WITH 

DITZ'S LAYAWAY PLAN 



Hart to join Wachob's campaign 



Former Presidential Candidate, 
Senator Gary Hart, will be in Elk 
Ck)unty in two weeks to campaign for 
Representative Bill Wachob. Rep. 
Wachob (pronounced WAH-cub), a 
candidate for U.S. Congress in the 
23rd District, said this week that 
Senator Hart was scheduled to ar- 
rive in Elk County on the afternoon 
of Oct. 22. 

Senator Hart, elected U.S. Senator 
from Colorado in 1974 and re-elected 
In 1980, was the runner up in the 
Democratic Presidential race this 



year. He is campaigning for selected 
candidates across the country in this 
final month before election day. 
Rep. Wachob said, "Senator Hart 
fought an aggressive, forward look- 
ing campaign for his bid for the 
Presidency this year, and I am 
pleased that he has chosen to lend 
his support in my bid for Congress." 
Wachob continued, "During the 
campaign, and as a member of the 
Senate Armed Services and Budget 
Committees. Senator Hart de- 
veloped a reputation as an innova- 



tor. He has been an active proponent 
of a leaner, more combat-ready 
military, and has put forth new ap- 
proaches to balancing the federal 
budget." 

Senator Hart will attend a cocktail 
reception at the Royal Motel at 6 
p.m. on Oct. 22, and will proceed to a 
dinner at Aiello's Cafe, beginning at 
7 p.m. Both events are open to the 
public; tickets may be obtained 
from the Wachob for Congress '84 
Campaign in Johnsonburg or by call- 
ing 814-%5-2342 or 814-238-4144. 



Mondale turns to students for votes 



Heartened by what supporters 
term "exceptional" and "very 
receptive" student audiences at sev- 
eral recent campus appearances, 
the Mondale campaign is trying to 
woo the elusive student vote with a 
renewed vigor, campaign organiz- 
ers report. 

The new strategy, however, aims 
at a sector of the population that 
rarely votes, and that seems to be 
swinging toward President Ronald 
Reagan, observers point out. 

Moreover, the head of the nation- 
wide College Democrats group 
thinks much of the campaign's new 
student focus is "hogwash," adding 
the Mondale troops in reality are not 
doing anything different from what 
they've been doing for months. 

Nevertheless, "Mondale is def- 
initely interested in getting our mes- 
sage to (college students)," says 
Gary Brickman, national youth 
coordinator for the Mondale/Fer- 
raro campaign. 

"Mondale has been speaking on 
quite a few college campuses, and 
he's really been getting a lot better 
response than earlier on in the cam- 
paign," Brickman claims. 

As a result, he says, "we're start- 
ing to focus on the campus vote and 
get-out-the-vote programs . " , 

The strategy change, Brickman 
says, came after Mondale's Septem- 
ber speech at the University of 
Southern California, which was 
punctuated by repeated heckles and 
jeers from Reagan supporters. 

But the hecklers only provoked 
Mondale into making one of his best 
speeches, Brickman says, injecting 
some excitement and controversy 
into the appearance. 



National press coverage of the 
event also helped boost Mondale's 
campus image, particularly after 
several of the hecklers admitted 
they were part of an organized effort 
to interrupt the speech, Brickman 
adds. 

Although an Oct. 5 New York 
Times Poll shows President Reagan 
h eavily favored among college-aged 
voters, Mondale supporters say the 
use speech gave new life to his 
campus campaign. 

The following week Mondale got 
another unexpected lift during a 
well-received speech at George 
Washington University in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

"When he went to George Wash- 
ington and got such an outstanding 
reception," Brickman says, "it 
really helped pick up" Mondale's in- 
terest in the student vote. 

As a result of the USC and George 
Washington speeches, "Mondale's 
campus campaign is a little more 
visible now, and we're picking up 
(the campus campaign) as we get 
closer to the election." 

Among other things, Mondale will 
squeeze more campus appearances 
into his schedule in the weeks before 
the election, and send other Demo- 
cratic leaders to campaign for him. 

Mondale headquarters recently 
released press releases for National 
Student Voter Registration Day, as- 
serting "students will vote in signi- 
ficant numbers to put an end to Rea- 
gan's underestimate of your gen- 
eration. 

"Your generation will decide this 
race," one of Mondale's prepared 
statements said. "For Ronald Rea- 



gan to think that you don't care 
about your own futures — care about 
cuts in loans for education and most 
of all about nuclear wr»r — is sheer 
arrogance." 

Former presidential candidates 
Gary Hart, (George McGovern, Jesse 
Jackson, and Alan Cranston — who 
themselves garnered sizable 
campus followings during their 
campaigns — will be speaking on 
Mondale's behalf at a number of 
schools, Brickman says, although he 
couldn't list any specific campuses. 

Jackson and Hart already have 
begun courting the student vote for 
Mondale at a number of recent 
campus visits, however. 

"Young people are really be- 
ginning to look at the issues," says 
Bill Morton, president of the College 
Democrats in Washington, D.C. 

"And Mondale's speech at George 
Washington was a turning point for 
his campus campaign," he adds. 

But Morton says the talk of a great 
new drive to get the college vote is 
"absolute hogwash," a ploy to get 
more media attention. 

Mondale's campus vote move- 
ment has been in full swing for 
months, Morton says, relying on 
voter registration efforts, speeches 
by Hart and Jackson, and campus 
appearances by Mondale's son and 
daughter at such schools as the State 
University of New York at Albany, 
Cal-Santa Barbara and Texas. 

Vice Presidential candidate Ger- 
aldine Ferraro, too, has campaigned 
at Memphis State, Vanderbilt and 
Akron, among others. 




The Red Stallion 

Friday's T.G.I. F. Party 
Starts at 1 p.m. 



4 for 1 Drafts 

3for 1 7oz. 

2 for 1 Cocktails 



^° 



^Y 



& 



^nN- 



2S'- 



cv 



c^ 



■<^ 



c 



s>- 



^t 



.>' 



Q> 



8— THE CLARION CALL, CI«rlon, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



Dorm overcrowding becoming a problem 



For the price of a regular, on- 
campus dorm room, John Carroll 
University (JCU) senior Norm 
Kotoch and 65 other students live in 
a luxury hotel off-campus, where 
they enjoy private washrooms, 
cable television, refrigerators, maid 
service, and swimming pool 
privileges. 

"Everyone's acting really well be- 
cause they don't want to spoil this 
situation," Kotoch says. "It's really 
working out great." 

Not for everyone. For JCU itself, 
putting up Kotoch and the others is 
costing a "substantial" amount of 
money, says James Lavin, JCU 
Dean of Student Life. 

But JCU had no other place to 
house the new students it attracted 
this fall, thanks to an unexpected six 
percent enrollment increase. 

In part because they've been suc- 
cessful in recruiting new students 
and in part because more students 
are opting to live on-campus this 
fall, many schools are suffering 

Positions 
Available 

By Daren Ayers 

Positions are available on the fol- 
lowing campus committees: 
Committee on Courses of Program 
and Study, Student Affairs Com- 
mittee, Student Publications, Stu- 
dent Activities Subcommittee, each 
needing at least two students. Ap- 
plication deadlines are Monday, Oct. 
22 and are available in the Student 
Senate office in 232 Egbert. Any 
questions, call Cori Toomey at 226- 
4829. 



GYN 
CHECKUPS 



dorm room shortages, reports Jim 
Grimm, president of College and 
University Housing Officers 
International (CUHOI) 

And while a lucky few studaits are 
living it up at luxury hotels, on most 
room-short campuses students must 
endure long waits, overcrowding, 
temporary housing in lounges and 
storage rooms, and sometimes no 
housing at all. 

At least 600 Iowa State students, 
for example, started the year 
without a place to live, and local and 
state agencies are still trying to 
shelter them. 

But a shortage of off-campus as 
well as on-campus housing is 
making a bad situation worse, offi- 
cials report. 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 
officials have turned down some 4000 
housing requests because of over- 
crowding there, says Lawrence 
HaUe, associate housing director. 

Over 500 University of California- 
Davis freshmen similarly were 
denied housing this fall. 

Other schools — South Florida, 
Illinois, Southern Cal, and Bates Col- 
lege in Maine among them — are 



coping with unexpected overflows 
by stuffing three and often four stu- 
dents in dorm rooms designed for 
single or double occupancy. 

At the University of Nebraska, for 
instance, where there are 5160 
spaces available for more than 5270 
students, officials are placing three 
students to a room. "We won't tum 
any student away because of 
housing shortages," says Housing 
Director Doug Zatechka. 

Zatechka claims tripling-iq;) stu- 
dents "has no effect on a student's 
GPA or the socialization process," 
especially compared to the alterna- 
tive of turning students out in the 
cold. 

"Turning a student away, espec- 
ially at state schools, is a crime," he 
says. "For a student, a triple room is 
better than no room . ' ' 

None of it, however, was supposed 
to happen. 

Many campus housing officials 
counseled that the terrible dorm 
overcrowding of the late 70's and 
early BO's was temporary, and that 
building new dorms to meet student 
demand for rooms was unwise be- 
cause enrollment nationwide was 



due to drop precipitously soon. 

Many schools, in fact, closed 
dorms over the last few years in 
anticipation of the enrollment 
decline. 

But enrollments, of course, 
haven't dropped. 

And more and more students are 
finding that "it's too expensive to 
live off-campus and being on 
campus is much more convenient," 
says CUHIO's Grimm. 

Students also are being drawn 
onto campus as colleges remodel 
and upgrade their dorms, says Ne- 
braska's Zatechka. 

"Dorms are a very safe place as 
far as fires and crime go," he adds. 
Some schools are even adding new 
furniture, unlimited food privileges, 
and computer facilities to entice new 
students. 

On the other hand, Berkeley is re- 
moving computers and video games 
from its dorm lobbies to make room 
for an unexpected glut of new stu- 
dents there. 

"Housing is definitely a problem," 
laments Harry Legrand, Berkeley's 
housing chief. "We tell studaits to 
look around early but many think it 




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Magician Ang«io lielay demonstrates one of his daring tricks for Clarion students during Autumn Leaf Week. 

■ ^ photo by Renee Rosensteel 



SUCCESS, SUCCESS, SUCCESS 



cab's is the hottest thing 
on campus and it happens 
every Saturday night from 
9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. So don't 
sit home or go anywhere else. 

COME DANCING at the 

EAGLE'S DEN 

This week's sponsor is 

CAMPUS MINISTRY 






Library Hours 

Additional study hall hours have 
been added to the Carlson Library 
schedule this term. The library will 
be open on a study hall basis from 10 
p.m. to midnight Sunday through 
Thursday. The full schedule of hours 
is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m.- 
Midnight* 

Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Saturday: lla.m.-5p.m. 

Sunday: 2p.m.-Midnight* 

♦Study Hall Only 10 p.m.-Midnight 
(Service points closed) 



just won't happen to them." 

So far, he says, the university has 
added 750 new spaces to accommo- 
date this year's overflow, besides 
leasing two residence halls from 
other nearby schools. 

Berkeley students living in lobbies 
and game rooms must store their 
personal belongings in gym lockers 
two blocks away, and endure a five- 
minute walk to take showers on 
another part of campus. 

At Yale, a number of students, 
upset with long waits and overcrowd- 
ing, have asked for housing deposit 
refunds so they can get apartments 
off campus. Administrators, though, 
are refusing to refund money except 
in "very, very rare" cases in which 
students need the money to continue 
their educations. 

"ITie freshman class at Yale is 
huge, and up until the time you're a 
senior (the housing situation) is 
pretty pad," says one disgruntled 
student who wants her $520 housing 
dep(»it back. 

"For the exhorbitant tuition we 
pay to go to this school, they make 
little exceptions to the system," says 
the student, who prefers to remain 
anonymous. "It's a system that 
makes you feel like a number." 

But some schools actually have 
housing surpluses this fall. 

Because there's so much off- 
campus housing available th is year, 
over 700 Arizona State students did 
not claim their reserved dorm 
rooms this semester, leaving the 
typically-overcrowded residence 
halls with dozens of unfilled rooms. 

And Loyola College in New 
Orleans solved its housing dilemma 
by buying a new residence hall from 
a recently-closed college over the 
summer. 

Student aid 
left unclaimed 

Approximately $135 million dol- 
lars in available student aid grants 
and scholarships went unclaimed in 
1983 according to information re- 
leased by National Student Services 
of Milwaukee, Wis. 

And even more money in available 
studrat funds will go unused in the 
coming years, according to fore- 
casts given by National Student 
Services, a financial aid matching 
service. 

"Over 3 billion dollars in grants 
and scholarships will be available to 
college students for the 1984-85 
school year. We predict that millions 
of cbllars will not be applied for be- 
cause much of the money available 
to students is through private or- 
ganizations and foundations," said 
Thomas Hines, a spokesman for Na- 
tional Student Services. "The aver- 
age student relies mostly on Pell 
Grants and other types of federally 
funded financial aid and ignores 
private aid source because they are 
not aware of them or they don't 
know how to contact the source. 
TTiet's why we have started National 
Student Services. 

National Student Services is a pri- 
vate company that matches a stu- 
dent's individual characteristics 
with available financial aid for a 
nominal fee. 

Hines stated that the nominal fee 
charged by National Student 
Services is made up in the time it 
■ sav^ a student who may try to re- 
search financial aid foundations 
through the Ubrary or other refer- 
eace material. 



THE CLARION CALL. Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 - 9 



ALF Autorama offers something for everyone 



By Tim Slaper 



One of the final events, and most 
attended of the events of the Autumn 
Leaf Festival, was the Autorama 
(car show) that was held Sunday, 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

The 223-car event took avenues 
place between 5th and 8th of Clar- 
ion's Main Street. 

The cars were parked along each 
curb and down the middle of the 



street in order of production year. 
Starting at one end of the street and 
working your way along was like ex- 
periencing an automotive time-line. 

Among the numerous factory pro- 
duction entries were many antique 
automobiles ranging from simple 
Model T's to chrome-laden Buick 
sedans. 

There were several mid-20's road- 
sters from both Ford and Chevy, all 



Farmers an(j merchants 
return for 35 years. 



By Kathleen LeMunyon 



If anyone tried to go downtown on 
Friday afternoon, you know that it 
was next to impossible. The reason 
for the masses of people was that 
Friday was the annual Farmers and 
Merchants Day, a regular part of the 
Autumn Leaf Festival. 

While the Farmers and Merchants 
Day began as exactly what the name 
implies, in the past years there has 
been more of a trend toward crafts 
being the most featured items. 
There were dried flower arrange- 
ments, natural foods, silk flowers, 
stained glass, homemade jams and 
jellies, portrait artist, baby clothes, 
wooden rocking horses, and many 
other things. There was even an 
apiary, complete with bees, in case 
anyone wished to purchase some 
honey. 

Speaking with some of the mer- 
chants that were there that day, it 
became evident that everyone was 
having a good time. Ethel Walker of 
Bradford, Pennsylvania and Dan 
McCarl of Sligo both commented on 
the friendliness of the people, while 
Jim Crespar of Elwood City and 
Janice (Jourley of New Bethlehem 



simply said that they were having a 
"wonderful time". 

It is surprising the number of 
years that these merchants have 
been participating in Farmers and 
Merchants Day. The veteran of the 
group has been coming for the past 
five years, but for the vast majority 
it was the first time. Fortunately 
though, experience had no bearing 
on sales and all reported business 
was brisk. 

Paul Weaver, of the Clarion 
Chamber of Commerce, gave me 
some insight on the Chamber's part 
of the day. He stated that there were 
160 stands set up downtown. Each 
stand was sponsored by either an in- 
dividual, a group such as the VFW, 
or a business. Each stand had to pur- 
chase a permit which cost $25. The 
revenue from these fees goes toward 
the various programs that the 
Chamber sponsors. 

Weaver also stated the majority of 
merchants were from the area, but 
that there were a few people from 
Ohio and Pittsburgh. 

The Farmers and Merchants Day 
has been a part of ALF week since 
the beginning of the Festival 35 
years ago. 



Parade marches on Main 



An estimated 90,000 men, women 
and children attended the 31st 
Annaul Autumn Leaf Festival this 
past weekend. Main Street and ad- 
jacent streets swarmed with crowds 
of people at 12 noon on Saturday. The 
parade featured strolling clowns and 
Indians, floats, marching bands, 
celebrities, politicans, cyclists, rol- 
ler skaters and the 1984 Homecom- 
ing C!ourt. 

The parade assembled itself in the 
parking lots around Nair and Wil- 
inson and at 12:00 sharp with sirens 
blasting, began its way down Wood 
Street. It first turned off at Seventh 
Avenue, then onto Main Street and 
ended its route on First Avenue. The 
floats then continued down into the 
stadium to be shown during the foot- 
ball game. The judges' table was set 
up in front of the Courthouse where 
each group got 30 seconds to present 
its show to the judges of the parade. 

The Clarion Shriners' Trykes 
called the Zem-Zems were the lead- 
off for the parade. They were fol- 
lowed by the Grand Marshall of the 
parade and USFL quarterback, Jim 



Kelly, of the Houston Gamblers. 
Pittsburgh's KDKA news anchor- 
woman, Patti Burns, was one of the 
VIP's for the event. Some Pennsyl- 
vania politicians, including Senator 
and Mrs. Patrick Stapleton of the 
41st District and 21st District 
Senator Tim Schaeffer were seen in 
the parade route. Clarion University 
President, Dr. Thomas Bond and 
Mrs. Bond drove through the parade 
greeting the huge crowds of spec- 
tators, too. 

One of the most spectacular sights 
of the parade was the float display. 
The theme for this year's ALF was 
"Back to Basics". Best of Parade 
was awarded to the Theta Chi Fra- 
ternity and Sigma Sigma Sigma 
Sorority for their woodland scene 
float that displayed animals with 
moveable parts. Center Board also 
sponsored a competition between 
the 10 university floats. Again, first 
prize went to the Theta Chi's and Tri 
Sigs. They won $200 for their great 
efforts. Secod prize was awarded to 
the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity and 
(Continued on Page 15) 




" louin and Cpuntrii " 

CLEANERS 

829 Main St. 226-4781 
in the 800 Center 

• FORMAL RENTALS •SUEDE AND LEATHER 

• CLEANING BY THE POUND •ALTERATIONS 



^ 



looking as if they had just come off 
the production line. 

William Fellows of Shippenville, 
started up his Model T Express Wa- 
gon and sounded the horn for a group 
of people, who were all impressed 
with his restoration work. 

Also present were a few of Ford's 
popular early 30's roadsters, 
complete with open-air rumble 
seats. 

Moving along the street there 
were Cadillacs, Pontiacs and 
Chevys from the late 1940s and 1950s, 
with all of their chrome, rounded 
fenders and tail fins. It was quite 
amazing to see what point automo- 
biles had developed to. 

Speaking with Lewis Anderson, of 
New Castle, owner of a 1950 Stude- 



baker Commander, which he com- 
pletely restored, he stated, "I 
bought it for $100 and it took me five 
years to complete." When asked 
how he got all the parts for the car, 
he replied, "I joined the Studebaker 
Qub, and I got a good deal of my 
parts through them." 

Lewis drives his car to all the 
shows he participates in. He also 
allows people to sit inside of the 
Studebaker which is a rare treat for 
many. 

Near the end of the street were 
cars from the 1960's. Among some of 
the Fords, Chevys, Pontiacs and old 
sedans and convertibles. A few pro- 
duction varieties were a 1969 
Pontiac Trans Am, a 1969 Dodge 
(larger and a super-charged Stude- 



baker. 

There were many sights for the 
hot-rod enthusiast to see at the Auto- 
rama ranging from early 1930's to 
mid-l%0's with chrome wheels, big 
tires, souped-up engines, wild paint 
jobs and customized interiors. 

Trophies were given out at 4:00 
p.m. Some winners were: Kenneth 
Britton of Houtzdale, Pa., who won 
the "Oldest Car" award with his 1917 
Ford Model T; Gib Mahle of the 
Autorama and chairman resident of 
Clarion, won the "Best Car" award 
with his custom built 1960 Pontiac 
pick-up. 

Watching all the cars leave was 
quite a sight. You din't even have to 
be a car enthusiast to enjoy the 
show. 



Ten beds vying for first place 
race down IVIain Street 



A bed is a place used for sleeping 
and reclining. . . but racing? Defin- 
itely, at 10:30 a.m. down Main Street 
on Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 beds were 
vying for the first place trophy in the 
Autumn Leaf Festival's annual Bed 
Races. 

Three heats occurred with three 
teams in the first two heats and four 
teams in the last heat. 

The first heat consisted of the Hos- 
pital Hustlers, Business in Bed, and 
The Farmington Life Savers. The 
Hospital Hustlers' team was run by, 
of course, three doctors from the 
Clarion Osteopathic Community 
Hospital. Even though the doctors 
hustled they placed third. Business 
in Bed moved as quickly as possible 
but placed second. The Farmington 
Life Savers sponsored by the Farm- 
ington Ambulance Company rushed 
into first place. 

Competition was also alive in the 
second heat of the race. The teams 
were as follows: Wobbly Wheels, 
Parts Pushers, and Posturepedic 
Pushers. Wobbly Wheels, sponsored 
by WDI, wobbled into third place. 
Parts Pushers, sponsored by 
Weaver Auto Parts, rolled into 
second place. Posturepedic Pushers 
with the help of their own cheer- 
leader, Mattress Man, pushed them- 
selves right into the finals. 

The third heat took off with the 



Band-aid cruiser, Concrete Kids, 
McDonald's Mouskaters, and Cor- 
bett's Cutters. Band-aid Cruiser 
cruised into last place where the 
Corbett's Cutters cut themselves a 
spot in the finals. 

The finals, which consisted of the 
Farmington Life Savers, Posture- 
pedic Pushers, and Corbett's Cut- 
ters, started off with a bang. 

First place trophy was given to the 
Posturepedic Pushers. Corbett's 
Cutters walked away with second. 



Third place was presented to the 
Farmington Life Savers. 

The Best in Bed trophy was 
awarded to the Hospital Hustlers, 
who provided the most outlandish 
looking bed. 

The 10 teams maneuvered the 
beds down a straight throughway, 
dropped off the rider to wait for 
them to climb through a pipe, hur- 
ried to a tire "S" curve, held the 
rider till the tire walk, and rushed to 
the finish line. 



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10— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984—11 






f»w|L 

\ 1 / ^* 






1 £^ «trr" 





i; 






Photo essay, clockwise from 
top left: It begins with a few 
leaves; then a bright shiny 
wheel that can be seen and en- 
joyed miles away draws the 
people; the food is prepared 
for all to enjoy; the people lin- 
ed the streets in anticipation; 
and the parade began; the cel- 
ebrities shared smiles, (left); 
and the bands played; a queen 
was crowned; a football team 
anguished, (down); the cars 
were spit-shined; there were 
animals to enjoy; it was called 
"spectacular", and though a 
good time was had by all. . .to 
its end. 

Photos by the Clarion Call 
photography staff 



10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984-11 




Photo essay, clockwise from 
top left: It begins with a few 
leaves; then a bright shiny 
wheel that can be seen and en- 
joyed miles away draws the 
people; the food is prepared 
for all to enjoy; the people lin- 
ed the streets in anticipation; 
and the parade began; the cel- 
ebrities shared smiles, (left); 
and the bands played; a queen 
was crowned; a football team 
anguished, (down): the cars 
were spit-shined; there were 
animals to enjoy; it was called 
"spectacular", and though a 
good time was had by all. . .to 
its end. 

Photos by the Clarion Call 
photography staff 



12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



Intern demand exceeds students available 



Thanks to the economic recovery, 
the market for student interns 
seems to have reversed itself in the 
last few weeks. 

A number of campuses around the 
country report businesses are offer- 
ing more internships this fall, and 
that the campus cooperative edu- 
cation offices are having a hard time 
finding enough students to satisfy 
the demand. 

"Placement is up this semester 
due to the turnaround in the econ- 
omy," reports Keith Kirby, Co-op Ed 
Director for Wichita State Univer- 
sity. "For the first time, employers 
are calling us for students." 

"We still have more students than 
positions," he declares, "but it's get- 
ting better." Kirby hop^ to place 
650 students th is year, up from 520 a 
year ago. 

"We register about 2000 students 
yearly," adds Marilyn Perry of 
Brigham Young's co-op education 
office. "Sometimes there are more 
students than openings. But, while 
we still do some looking for posi- 
tions, more and more companies are 
coming to us with positions. And 
placements are definitely up." 

The economic upswing also is pro- 
viding an abundance of internships 
for North Texas State students, es- 
pecially in "high tech" industries, 
says NTS program director Diane 
Altenloh. 

"Jobs are booming in this area," 
she maintains. "And we're close 
enough to Dallas/Fort Worth that we 
can place our students there, too." 

And Illinois State University re- 
ports a growing number of employ- 
ers are recruiting students from co- 
operative education, then hiring 
them upon graduation. 

"It's not guaranteed," explains 
Bill Kirk, engineering supervisor at 



Monsanto's East St. Louis, II., plant, 
which takes on "two or three" en- 
gineering students a semester. "But 
we've hired quite a number of 
them." 

ISU's employer/student ratio 
"varies from day to day," says Dr. 
Marlyn Laurentz, head of the 
campus's program. "But we're 
maintaining a pretty solid balance." 

Not all colleges, of course, are do- 
ing as well in placing students 
through cooperative education pro- 
grams, which place students in ca- 
reer-related positions with com- 
panies and allow them to earn aca- 
demic credit, often while getting a 
salary. 

"In the last two semesters, the 
program has shown a decline," 
admits Lewis Hainlin of Drake Uni- 
versity in Des Moines. 

Hainlin attributes a lO-to-12 per- 
cent drop in the number of students 
it places to the loss of a federal 
grant. 

"There are lots of positions in in- 
surance, accounting, management 
and communications," he laments, 
"but it's hard to find positions for 
liberal and fine arts students." 

New state regulations, plus a drop 
in the number of paid positions, has 
cut student participation in Miami- 
Dade Community College's program 
by five percent this semester. 

"Florida mandates certain tests 
before students can enter their 
junior year," explains Dr. Roger 
Wadsworth, co-op ed director. "Stu- 
dents need to take more courses to 
pass the tests, so they don't want to 
pay for co-op ed credits. ' ' 

Still, the college generally has 
more students apply "than we can 
find meaningful jobs for," 
Wadsworth notes. "And even with 
all our extra recruiting this semes- 



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ter, we came out with a five percent 
drop." 

The relatively few programs 
lagging now, and those that dropped 
during the recent recession have in- 
spired the National Commission for 
Cooperative Education to attempt a 
campaign to improve them. 

The commission plans a multi- 
million dollar media blitz to rejuv- 
enate depressed programs and es- 
tablish new ones, reports Dr. John 
Dromgoole, the commission's re- 
search director. 

Dromgoole maintains co-op ed is 



growing, although the number of 
colleges with programs has leveled 
off last year at about 900 from a 1981 
high of 1,017. 

Inactive programs removed from 
the commission's list caused the de- 
crease, he claims. 

About 175,000 students participate 
in co-op ed yearly, he estimates. 

"The biggest problem is that 
about 80 percent of those students 
are enrolled in about 25 percent of 
the programs," he observes. 

The commission hopes the ad 
campaign will double the number of 
"legitimate" participants by 1989. 



While nationwide statistics for this 
year's co-op ed programs aren't out 
yet, a number of administrators 
believe the upswing already has 
begun. 

Wichita State's Kirby thanks an 
emergence from "the depths of eco- 
nomic chaos" and his five-year-old 
program's "maturity" for the boom 
in internships. 

Brigham Young's Perry notes her 
program has always fluctuated with 
the economy, and that a recent 
change in BYU's registration pro- 
cedures also kept some students 
away. 



Clarion drop-outs startle study 




By Darren B. Fouse 



Franclne McNalry, Dean of Academic Support Services and Assistant to the 
Academic Vice-President is responsible for the studies performed on stu- 
dent retention. photo by Blaine Miller 



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Fri-Sat. 9a.m.-10p.m. 



Francine McNairy, Dean of Aca- 
demic Support Services and Assist- 
ant to the Academic Vice-President, 
performed a research study on stu- 
dent retention to better understand 
why some Clarion students finish 
their education and why others drop 
out. A report called "Holding 
Power" is the result of the study, 
which was based on the 1982-83 aca- 
demic school year. The goal of the 
study is to be able to deal with po- 
tential drop-outs and reduce its 
occurrence. 

A number of surveys were sent out 
to both persisters and drop outs to 
discover various influences and at- 
titude differences towards Clarion 
University. Despite stereotypical 
beliefs, there were some interesting 
results. 

The attitudes towards the Uni- 
versity for both groups were posi- 
tive. In fact, in an overall outlook, 
drop outs were even more positive 
than the persisters. 

So who are those drop outs and 
why did they leave Clarion? 

Out of the number of drop outs, 49 
percent were freshmen. The ma- 
jority of all the drop outs were aca- 
demically sound. With 62 percent 
maintaining a Q.P.A. of 2.0 or better 
and 21 percent of those recording a 
3.0 or better. So contrary to popular 
belief, drop outs aren't always your 
irresponsible, non-caring students. 

The reasons for leaving Clarion 
vary among drop outs, but in almost 
all cases it was the accumulation of 
several factors. The top responses 
consisted of the lack of financial re- 
sources; Clarion was too far from 
home; Clarion wasn't for me and 
Clarion didn't offer a certain major. 
Other important factors were the 
ability to function as a student and 
the interaction with the administra- 
tion, faculty and staff. 

McNairy is presently working on a 
more recent report which will be 
available in a few months. 

These reports can be very bene- 
ficial in preventing some drop out 
situations from occurring, and can 
aid the University in coping with 
students' problems. For example, 
making the students more aware of 
special facilities like the writing 
center and other student aids, or ad- 
vising students on certain financial 
options. 

The national percentage of fresh- 
men drop outs is at 30 percent, 
where Clarion is only 23 percent. 

McNairy realizes that Clarion 
doesn't have the problem other in- 
stitutions do but in a concerned way, 
described drop outs as "the loss of a 
mind," and believes that if a student 
feels positive about Clarion and 
truly wants an education, they 
should have it. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1964-13 



Raising drinlcing age causes campus turmoil 



Alcohol is closely associated with 
college life and many students simply 
don't know how to spend their leisure 
time without drinking, says Charles 
Tucker, a University of South Florida 
sociologist. 

The rising drinking ages and 
tougher campus drinking rules 
nationwide are "sure to cause con- 
cern and turmoil on many 
campuses," adds Gerardo Gonzales, 
a University of Florida counselor and 
director of BACCHUS, a national 
group aimed at controlling student 
drinking. 

It's "a situation that administra- 
tors realistically canirat enforce," he 
asserts. 



If schools are going to make the 
new rules work, they need to provide 
alternative social activities, says 
Tucker. 

\Tithout help, studatits are left to 
entertain rumors of undercover cam- 
pus police infiltrating dorm and rush 
parties to catch underaged drinkers. 

That rumor was so widespread at 
Arizona State that ASU police two 
weeks ago had to issue a public denial 
to reassure students. 

And University of California-Berk- 
eley administrators last week chas- 
tised the student newspaper, the 
Daily Califomian, for running an 
article that told students how to get 
fake i.d.s. to obtain liquor despite the 



Classifieds 



For Sale: 1978 AMC Concord sedan, 
very good condition. $1650. Call 
764-3474 after 4 p.m. and ask for 

Ed. 

For Sale: '74 Kawasaki 250. Excel- 
lent condition. Must sacrifice, will 
consider trade for 35mm camera. 
Phone 2803. 

Rent a VCR and plan a party only 
$24.95. Includes a FREE movie. 
VHS-Blank tapes, $4.95 for ALF. 
Film Rental Club membership 
only $10. Qarion Video Center 
226-5872. 11 S. 6th Ave. Mon.-Sat. 
12: 00-8: 00 and Sun. 12:00-5:00. 

Help Wanted: Campus reps to run 
spring break vacation trip to Day- 
tona Beach. Earn free trip and 
money. Send resume to College 
Travel Unlimited. P.O. Box 6063, 
Station A., Daytona Beach, FL 
32022, include phone numbers 
please. 

Music Master can fulfill all of your 
musical needs. All occasions from 
parties to dances, just name it, 
and we'll play it. Various music 
and requests are backed by a pro- 
fessional sound system and a su- 



perior light show guaranteed to 
make any occasion special. Call 

226-3163 

Slave days are here! Yard clean-up, 
wood splitting, storm windows 
cleaned, or any odd jobs!! $3.00 
per hour. Benefits Clarion Univer- 
sity Biology Club. Call for de- 
taUs 226-2274, 

Is it true you can buy jeeps for $44 
through the U.S. Government? 
Get the facts today! Call (312) 
742-1142 Ext. 3701. 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,553/ 
yr. Now hiring. Your area. Call 
805-687-6000 Ext. R-6334. 

Gloria, You're the best little in the 
world. I love ya bunches! Sigma 
love and mine. Your big sis ! 

The World of Life Pentecostal Fel- 
lowship group meets Fridays at 6 
p.m. in the Campbell Hall base- 
ment. 

"You have heard that it was said, 
'You shall not commit adultry.' 
But I say to you that everyone who 
looks at a woman lustfully has al- 
ready committed adultery with 
her in his heart." Matthew 5:27-28. 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, OCT. 18 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Fried Eggs, Fried Potatoes, Biscuit, Chilled Grapefruit Sections, 
Hot Waffles w/Syrup, Cherry Danish. 

LUNCH : Cream of Barley Soup, Beef Broth, Hot Dog on Roll w/Chili Sauce on Side, Hot Meat Loaf 
Sandwich w/Gravy, Hash Brown Potatoes, Bailed Limas. 

DINNER: Cream of Barley Soup, Beef Broth, Fried Chicken, Stuffed Cabbage Rolls, Carrots, 
Mashed Potatoes, Brussel Sprouts. 
FRIDAY, OCT. 19 

BREAKFAST: Ham and Cheese Omelette, Bacon, Hot Sticky Buns, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, 
Grilled Ham, Raisin Muffin. 

LUNCH: New England Clam Chowder, Chicken Noodle Soup, Bacon, Lettuce and Tomato on 
Toast, Pizza, Potato Chips, Mixed Vegetables. 

DINNER: New England Clam Chowder, Chicken Noodle Soup, Baked Fillet Haddock, Grilled 
Chopped Sirloin Steak, Com, French Fries, Collard Greens. 
SATURDAY, OCT. 20 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Orange, Scrambled Eggs, Jelly Roll, Stewed Primes, Pancakes w/Hot Sy- 
rup, Banana Bread. 

LUNCH: Chicken Rice Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Sloppy Joe on Bun, Egg Salad Sandwich, O'Brien 
Potatoes, Cauliflower. 

DINNER: Chicken Rice Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Chicken Cutlet, Stuffed Shells, Cabbage, Fresh 
Potatoes w/Chive Butter, Squash. 
SUNDAY. OCT. 2> 

BRUNCH: Pink Grapefruit Half, Chilled Pineapple Pieces, Oiicken Ala King on Biscuit, Smoked 
Sausage Links, Fried Eggs, Bagel w/Cream Cheese, Fresh Banana, French Toast w/Syrup, 
Bacon, Home Fried Potatoes, Cinnamon Rolls. 

DINNER: Cappelletti Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Roast Leg of Lamb, Batter Fried Fish, Corn, 
Duchess Potatoes, Green Beans. 
MONDAY, OCT. 22 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Scrambled Eggs, Farina, Cinnamon Ross, Fried Potatoes, Chilled 
Citrus Sections, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, Coffee Crumb Cake. 

LUNCH: Chili Soup, Cream of PoUto Soup, lulian Steak Sandwich, Cheese Omelette, Tater-Tots, 
Hot Cinnamon Apple. 

DINNER: Chili Soup, Cream of PoUto Soup, Roast Pork w/Gravy, Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, 
Whipped Sweet Potatoes w/Marshmallows, Peas, Beets. 
TUESDAY, OCT. 23 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Smoked Bacon Slices, Cream of Rice, Peach Muffins, Fried Po- 
Utoes, Cherry Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, Sausage Patty, Caramel Rolls. 

LUNCH: Cream of Chicken Soup, Tomato Macaroni Soup, Pizza, Country Style Ham & Cabbage, 
Potato Dumplings, Beans. 

DINNER: Cream of Chicken Soup, Tomato Macaroni Soup, Roast Chicken Eighths, Beef Stew, 
Mashed Potatoes w/Gravy, Carrots, Okra. 
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 

BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana, Fried Eggs - Sunnyside or Over, Hot Oatmeal, English Muffin, 
Fried Potatoes, Chilled Pear Halves, Buttermilk Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Date Nut Bread. 
LUNCH : Homemade Beef Noodle Soup, Chicken Broth, Cheese Dog on Roll, w/Onions and Relish, 
Chicken Chow Mein w/Crisp Noodles, Doritos, Baked Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef Noodle Soup, Chicken Broth, Baked Pork Chop w/Stuffing Cap and 
Gravy. Swedish Meat Balls, Hot Cinnamon Apple Sauce, Buttered Rice. Asparagus. 



university's newly-adopted 
restrictions. 

On some campuses, new drinking 
rules are costing students their part- 
time jobs. 

At the University of Illinois- 
Champaign, local bar owners recent- 
ly predicted as many as 150 students 
could lose their part-time waiting and 
bartending jobs if the town govern- 
ment decides to require all liquor 
servers to be 21. 

Some observers even fear the new 
crackdown on student drinking could 
boomerang, forcing younger students 
to become "underground" drinkers. 

Left with no place to legally drink 
(XI campus, they warn under-aged 
students will do more off-campus 
drinking, more drinking and driving, 
and be less-inclined to drink respon- 
ably. 

"Most of the campus drinking pro- 
grams are community-wide 
programs that deal generally with all 



students," notes Howard Blane, 
professor of education and 
psychology at the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

"There's been precious little re- 
search done on such programs, and 
of the little that has been done the re- 
sults aren't very encouraging," he 
says. 

"Die nationwide trend to raise all 
ch-inking ages to 21 has "shifted the 
focus from alcohol education to 
policy enforcement," Gonzales 
complains. 

"We encourage alcohol education 
and responsible drinking, rather than 
blanket prohibitions," he says. 

But blanket prohibitions seem to be 
the trend these days. 

While 23 states had minimum 
drinking ages of 21 a year ago, this 
fall the total has climbed to 27, with a 
number of states still debating — or 
planning to debate — raising their 
drinking ages to 21. 



And with a new federal law which 
will withhold federal highway funds 
from states that haven't raised their 
drinking ages to 21 by 1966, coU^e 
students can expect further clamp- 
downs as the remaining 23 states with 
under-21 drinking ages rush to meet 
the deadline. 

"I imagine we'll see some prrtty 
hot legislative battles in the coming 
year," says Bob Bingaman, director 
of the State Student Association 
(SSA) in Washington, D.C., which 
has helped student governments 
nationwide lobby against drinking 
age hikes in their states. 

"I personally think (raising 
drinking ages to 21) is unfortunate," 
says Pitt's Blane. "If 18-year-olds are 
allowed to vote, fight in the military, 
and sign contracts, they should be al- 
lowed to drink. We're simply driving 
student drinkers undercover. 



Interview seminar captivates audience 



By Jennifer Cadek 



On Tuesday, Sept. 25, at 3:30 p.m. 
in Carter Auditorium, Mr. Thomas 
Michel spoke to a captivated aud- 
ience about interviewing skills. The 
seminar, sponsored by the Career 
Placement Services, was designed 
to help seniors present themselves in 
an effective and organized manner 
when meeting a prospective em- 
ployer. Michel, a professor in the 
Speech Communication and Theatre 
Etepartment, is beginning his second 
year at Clarion University. Michel 
finished his undergraduate work at 
the University of Minnesota, and 



went on to complete his graduate 
work at Bowling Green State Uni- 
versity. 

At the seminar, Michel empha- 
sized the importance of "selling 
yourself" in an interview. The first 
step in doing this, he says, is to be 
prepared. "Have a verbal and rental 
resume. After you finish telling your 
friends about your upcoming inter- 
view, have them test you on your 
speaking skills." He also suggested 
scripting out what you plan to say 
about your capabilities, so that you 
are better prepared to handle any 
questions the interviewer may ask. 

Ninety percent of all interviewers 



will introduce themselves, sit down, 
and ask you to "Tell me about your- 
self." Michel emphasizes that now is 
not the time to be shy. You will have 
to condense 22 years into approxi- 
mately four minutes He suggests 
speaking about your academic life, 
your work experience, and if appli- 
cable, your athletic life. 

"Why should 1 hire you?" is a 
second important question that you 
should be prepared for. Since there 
is a 50 percent chance of being 
caught exaggerating a QPA, or ex- 
panding job responsibilities, Michel 
recommends honesty. The employer 
(See Career, Page 14) 



t^'^^fFmitm <^^'^ ^i-m ii.#"'iiK*s' *■ ;r¥- -am^'^^iis ^^ -* 



^ 



'SI 



Qintted Campus cjUintst/ty 



CoiidlaUdi^ iniiiteg you to: 



• ''Sunday Night at the Parsonage" 

(Wesley Fellowship) 

Every Sunday, 7:30 p.m. at the home of 
Rev. and Mrs. Leroy Jones 
338 Wood St. (for rides call 226-6662) 

• CUP Fellowship 

Every Thursday, 8:30 p.m. at the home of 
Rev. and Mrs. Dan Michalak 
47 S. 7th Ave. (for rides call 226-5946) 

• New Association 

The 1 St and 3rd Wednesday of every month at 7:00 p.m. 
Reimer Coffee House 



t 



1i 

m. 

\ 



-a 



14 - THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 

One third females harassed 



Nearly one-third of all female college 
students are sexually harassed on 
campus — mostly by male faculty 
members — but few women 
complain because of embarrassing, 
drawn-out grievance procedures, a 
new book claims. 

The harassment, moreover, can 
cause emotional problems and make 
victims hostile toward men, says 
Linda Weiner, University of Cincin- 
nati vice provost for student affairs 
and Billie Wright Dzeich, a U.C. En- 
glish professor, authors of "The 
Lecherous Professor," a book on 
harassment on campus. 

"Students are frightened," Dzeich 
explains. "They let harassment go 
on. They endure it, anything but con- 
front it. 'I don't want him to get in 
trouble, I just want him to stop,' is a 
common reaction." 

Students often feel intimidated or 
powerless to stop the harassment, al- 
though institutions are required to 
have grievance procedures and pro- 
grams to support them, Dzeich points 
out. 

"Many of these programs are slow 
in coming," she states. "But if 
they're not adequate, students begin 
to protest." 

Few faculty members harass 
students, Dzeich stresses, but those 
who do are usually chronic repeaters. 

"A million-plus women are 
harassed each year, " she adds. "But 
it's a small number of faculty who do 
it." 

ITie authors found three common 
types of harassers. 

The "counselor-helper" preys on 
troubled students" needs for close 
relationships. The "power broker" 
bargains grades and recommen- 
dations tor sexual la vers, and th e 
'■intellectual seducer" draws per- 
sonal iniormation irom students in 
class. 

The authors" findings are con- 
sistent with those in other harrass- 
ment studies. 

TTie University of California at 
Berkeley determined in 1979 that 20 



percent of its female students 
received unwanted sexual attention 
from instructors. 

In a 1982 University of Washington 
study, 41 percent of campus women 
claimed they'd been sexually harass- 
ed. In 1983, nearly a fourth of Penn 
State's women students said they had 
been harassed. 

"Our policy on sexual harassment 
allows students three channels for 
complaints," reports Vicky Eide of 
Iowa State University's Affirmative 
Action office. "Informal complaints 
go through advisors or department 
chairs. Affirmative Action handles 
formal complaints, or students may 
go through an outside channel such 
as the Iowa Civil Rights 
Commission." 

But few women ever file charges, 
she adds. 

"They come in and discuss options, 
but never come back," Eide says. 
"At this time no cases are under in- 
vestigation." 

The Univeristy of California at 
Santa Barbara handles about 20 
sexual harassment complaints a year 
through its University Grievance Of- 
ficer (UGO) and a number of other 
contacts. 

"Only one formal grievance has 
)een filed since 1981,^^ says Dr. 
Harleen McAda, the current UGO. 

The low numbers of complaints are 
deceiving, Dzeich claims, and can 
make colleges complacent. 

"An institution can kid itself," she 
says. "But it may not be an environ- 
ment in which students are com- 
fortable complaining." 

Informal complaints are easier to 
make, Dziech adds, but these aren't 
formally recorded or thoroughly in- 
vestigated. 

A better method, she says, is to 
confront the harasser non-aggress- 
ively. If he continues, complain to a 
trusted advisor, department head or 
administratt 

"Keep ret. ids o*" events," she 
stresses. "Write hi. i a letter and 
keep a copy of it. Document 
everything." 



• • • 



• ••••••••# 



##•••••• 



• ••••' 






He 'II be at Football Games. He 'II be in 
downtown Clarion. He 'II be at the Children 's 
Hospital Drive, Parties, Wrestling Matches, 
ALL OVER CAMPUS. 




He'll be 
Everywhere! 



BUT WHO IS HE? 
FIND OUT.. .SOON! 



Texas A&M frat strikes oil 




90 CABLE FM 



• ••• 



"We're obviously very pleased," 
understates William Powell. 

He has reason to be. Powell's fra- 
ternity, the Texas A&M chapter of 
Sigma Chi just had its own oil well 
become a producer. 

An oil company proposed drilling 
some 150 yards from the fraternity 
house last school year, and a Hous- 
ton firm, INEXCO, eventually 
bought the drilling rights. UNEXCO 
struck oil in the well the first week of 



September. 

No one at INEXCO or Sigma Chi is 
certain how much the well will be 
worth, though it currently is produc- 
ing about 483 barrels of oil a day. At 
current prices, it could be worth a 
gross amount of $13,000 a day. 

Proceeds, of course, would be split 
among INEXCO, middlemen, Sigma 
Chi headquarters and the campus 
Sigma Chi Corporation, which owns 
the land on which the well was 



drilled. 

"It's not like we're instant mil- 
lionnaires," notes Anyd Beaky, the 
house's former treasurer. "We'll get 
royalties each month, but that will 
go toward building a new house." 

In the meantime, the oil strike and 
well have other uses for Sigma Chi 
members. 

"During rush it was a great topic 
of interest," Beaky reports. 'At 
night parties, we put lights all over it 
for fun." 



Penalties for rapists listed 



A rapist can get life in prison in 
Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Geor- 
gia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, 
Maryland, Massachusetts, Michi- 
gan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, 
North Carolina, Oklahoma, Pennsyl- 
vania, Tennessee, Utah, Virginia, 



Rh ode Island, and Washington, D.C. 
In Mississippi, rape is punishable by 
death. 

In Alaska and South Carolina, a 
rapist now can get 30 years. In Mon- 
tana and Nebraska it's 40 years. In 
Indiana and Wyoming it's 50 years, 



Test your T.V. trivia 



Another test your TV Trivia Quo- 
tient: 

6-7 correct, Amazing; 4-5, Outstand- 
ing; 2-3, Middling; 0^1, Disappoint- 
ing. 
Quiz 3 

Drama: Michael Conrad made 
these five words famous in his role 
as Sergeant Esterhaus on Hill Street 
Blues. 

Comedy: Name the school where 
Miss Brooks taught on Our Miss 
Brooks. 

Movies: This young beauty was a 
14-year-old pinball wizard in 1979's 
Tilt. 

News: Why did Tom Brokaw balk 






at the chance to anchor Today in 
1974? 

Sports: In a 1972 NFL playoff 
game, who caught what is known as 
the "immaculate reception"? 

Kids: On Lassie, this runaway 
orphan boy was found by the collie 
hero in 1957, and became a regular 
character. 

Other TV; This late-night host 
walked off his show in 1960 over the 
right to tell a joke. 

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in Minnesota it's 20 years and a fine 
of $35,000. In South Dakota it's 25 
years and a $25,000 fine. 

In many states the penalties are 
more severe under certain circum- 
stances. In Illinois the usual 4-to-15- 
year sentence is upgraded to 6-to-30 
years if the victim is younger than 13 
or older than 60. 

In Tennessee the sentence is in- 
creased by five years if the attack 
results in pregnancy, venereal dis- 
ease or a mental breakdown. 

In Louisiana the penalties may be 
more severe if the victim was drunk, 
retarded or tricked into thinking he 
or she had gotten married the night 
before. 

In California each prior felony 
conviction can increase a rape sen- 
tence by five to 10 years. By T\moth.y 
Harper, Associated Press. 

Career 

Continued from page 13 

will appreciate the fact that you 
would be a trustworthy employee. 
Michel suggests ways of setting 
yourself apart from others: "If, for 
example, you attended school and 
also had a part-time job, it shows 
that you possess ambition and or- 
ganizational skills that are unique to 
a typical 21-year-old." He explains 
that modesty is not an attractive 
quality here. 

"What are your strengths and 
weaknesses?" is often the next ques- 
tion asked. Michel feels that the best 
way to handle this is to "save some 
of your strengths for your weak- 
nesses." Stating that you are a dedi- 
cated worker but sometimes push 
others too hard is an excellent way 
of handling this question. 

Perhaps the most dreaded 
question that employers ask is 
"What is your QPA?" "This," 
Michel told a crowd of relieved 
faces," is often asked only because 
employers are concerned about a 
student's attitude. They are looking 
for improvement in QPA, not nec- 
essarily a 4.0." 

The follow-up to the interview is 
just as important as the actual meet- 
ing itself. "A note or phone call 
thanking the employer for the inter- 
view and asking when the decision 
will be made shows your commit- 
ment to the job," states Michel. 

For those interested in learning 
more about presenting themselves 
in public, Michel recommends 
taking the honors seminar in Inter- 
personal Communication, in the 
spring, or Business and Professional 
Speaking in the fall. Anyone inter- 
ested in signing up for Interpersonal 
Communication should see Mr. 
Michel in 143 Marwick-Boyd. 

NEWS TIP 
2380 



THE CLARION CALL, Thursday. Oct. 18, 1084 - 15 



Clarion mayortakes issue with campus/community relations 



By Michele LaTour 
Features Editor 



Over the years in the later 1960's 
and early 1970's, problems arose be- 
tween the university students and 
the Clarion Area residents. 

Fraternities began moving off 
campus and the noise continuously 
disturbed the surrounding residents. 
Since this problem continued to in- 
crease the Noise Ordinance was en- 
acted. 

Fraternities also caused consid- 
erable damage to the [H-operty in 
which they Uved. This caused the 
residents to feel uneasy about the 
vandalism that might occur on their 
own property, and also about the 



Parade... 



vandalism done in the town itself. 

There was not much help given by 
the University to stop the growing 
problem with the students and the 
town. Clarion's administration felt 
that the problem was not of their 
concern since it happened off the 
campus grounds. The Garion ad- 
ministration felt they had no author- 
ity with off-campus students. 

Although not all the problems 
were caused by the students of Clar- 
ion, they were usually the ones that 
received the blame. 

The bad feelings between the 
Clarion Area residoits towards the 
University began to change when 
the Clarion administration changed 



(Continued from Page 9) 



Alpha Sigma Kappa Fraternity for 
their, "Give a Hoot, Don't Polute," 
Woodsy the Owl float. They received 
$125 in prize money. The third place 
float was WCCB's and the Sig Eps 
"The Natural High" forest-Uke 
float. The group received $75. Each 
of the three winning floats' organiza- 
tions also received 40 complimentary 
packages of pomi» to use for future 
floats. 

There were six judged categories 
during the parade. The "AA" High 
School Band category was won by 
Elderton with second and third 
places being awarded to Dayton and 
Kittanning High Schools, respective- 
ly. The "AAA" High School Band 
competition was won by Apollo- 
Ridge; Carlynton received second 
place and Highlands Varsity Band 
captured the third place winning. 
Twenty-two bands were involved in 
this year's Autumn Leaf Festival 
Parade. The other categories were 
Majorette and Baton, Novelty, 
Junior Drum Corj^ and Colorguard. 
Eiach group who received one of 
first, second or third priz^ was 
awarded a trophy and a money 
prize. 

The Autumn Leaf Festival 
attracts people not only from sur- 
rounding areas, but more distant 
communities as well. Roger Miller 
of Sharon, PA brings his family 
every year to see the area's beauti- 
ful fall foliage and go camping while 
enjoying the ALF festivities. Mr. 
Miller said, "It's like a tradition 
with our family. We all look forward 
to the festival every year." 

Many Clarion students' parents 
drove quite a distance to attend 
Clarion's ALF. Mr. and Mrs. Lee 



Sesto came from Bellevue, PA to 
spend the day with their daughter, 
Lee ann, while Mr.iind Mrs. Michael 
Federoff traveled over 75 miles from 
Penn Hills, PA to see their dau^ter, 
Laurie, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Goth 
journeyed three hours from Silver 
Creek, NY to visit their children, 
Debbie and Ed. Last year the Goths 
came only to see their son play in the 
Homecoming football game, but 
enjoyed themselves so much that 
they decided this year to stay and 
see some of what Clarion had to offer 
over the exciting weekend. Debbie 
and Ed's older sister, Michele, and 
her boyfriend drove five hours from 
Rochester, NY to see the ALf's fes- 
tivities as well. 

The two hour parade came to a 
close with a double decker bus made 
for the Knight's Inns. Anyone who 
saw the parade would surely say 
how fun it was. People from miles 
around came to Clarion to join in the 
celebration of the 1%4 Autumn Leaf 
Festival. 




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DRINKING AND DRIVING 
CAN KlU A FRIENDSHIR 



and President Bond took office. Dur- 
ing the years of 1977 and 1978 the 
change took an upward swing. 

The Clarion Borough Council be- 
gan to get involved with the Clarion 
administration with the orientation 
program for the freshmen. The Qar- 
ion students also enhanced the 
change when the Greeks on campus 
began performing community pro- 
jects. 

Mayor Melvin Riffer stated that 
since President Bond's arrival the 
"quality of the student has dramati- 
cally changed." 

Students began changing their at- 
titudes about the town of Clarion and 
started getting involved and sup- 



porting the community. Mayor 
Riffer feels that this is needed. He 
stated that students, "can't leave 
the responsibility of a citizen at 
home when you come to college." 

The improving relationship can be 
attributed to the involvement of the 
students in the town. It is important 
though that all community projects 
are publicized so that everyone in 
the town is aware of the effort . 

Another way to enhance the rela- 
tionship is for the college parties to 
be kept under control The number of 
people at a party also has an impact 
on the problems that occur. Mayor 
Riffer said that it is not the small 
parties but the parties of over 100 



people that require the Clarion Po- 
lice to come and issue warnings or 
citations. Contrary to popular belief, 
it is not the Qarion residents who 
call the police, but fellow students or 
even the people who are having the 
party. 

Mayor Riffer feels there is a ser- 
ious drinking problem, but that it 
does not leave when the college stu- 
dents leave. He also feels the resi- 
dents of Clarion feel this way also. 

TTie attitudes of both the town and 
the university are continually chang- 
ing. When asked how he feels about 
the new relationship, Mayor Riffer 
stated, "Generally most pleased 
with the way things are going." 



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16 - THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



Student takes KXAS producer/editor job 



By Gino Benza 



Opportunity knocked, two Thurs- 
days ago, for Jeff Newpher, in the 
form of a job offer in Fort Worth, 
Texas. The offer was the result of an 
internship he'd had with station 
KXAS. 

According to Jeff, "The KX stands 
for kicks and the AS is whatever you 
want it to be." Newpher has ac- 
cepted the position of Producer/Edi- 
tor of the sports for the five, six, and 
10 o'clock news at KXAS channel 
five, which is an affiliate of NBC. 

His duties will include working 
with the video tapes of different 
sporting events, writing stories and 
re-writing stories that are distribut- 
ed to all NBC affiliates. 

He will also be editing video of the 
events. Newpher hopes to create a 
story that has the chance of being 
distributed to other NBC channels. 

The position Newpher will be as- 
suming is mid, not entry, level, and 
would probably take a person three 
to five years to work up to. 

As an intern, this summer, New- 
pher was responsible for taping base- 
ball games in addition to local sport- 
ing events. He feels his experience 



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that he gained working for Qarion 
University Broadcasting Channel 5, 
gave him an added feeling of ease 
around the equipment and pro- 
cedures at the station. 

Another responsibility of New- 
pher's was writing highlights to 
coincide with the video tapes. His 
supervisor considered his work to be 
on the level of professional writers in 
the field. 

As well as performing his daily 
duties, Newpher kept his ears open 
for other projects. One of these was 
to attend a press conference for the 
Texas Rangers' baseball team. At 
this conference, he was able to inter- 
view Odibie McDowell, Sid Akins, 
and Jeff Hunkle. 

One of the projects Newpher com- 
pleted this semester in Clarion, was 
a special on the retirement of the 
girls' gymnastics coach, Gayle 
Truitt-Bean. He used many of the 
techniques he used this summer in 
the special. 

Newpher's work, as an intern, was 
of enough quality to keep him in the 
mind of Scott Murray, the weekday 
anchorman and Sports Director at 
the station, who offered him the job. 

As a consequence to accepting the 
position, Newpher won't be able to 
complete this semester in Clarion. 
He will complete the necessary 20 
credits needed at a college in Texas, 
and will have the credits transferred 
back to Clarion so he will have a de- 
gree from Clarion University. 

Had it been impossible for him to 
earn his degree, Newpher would not 
have acc^ted the job. 

Newpher advises students to get 
involved, not in everything, just 
things that are valuable and inter- 
esting to you. Newpher's philosophy 
can be summed up as this, "The 



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harder you work the luckier you get, 
you make your own breaks . ' ' 

Another valuable piece of advice 
he offers is, to be proud of your own 
work. Pride in his own work is one of 
the characteristics of Newpher, 
which impressed his soon-to-be em- 
ployer. 

After a, shorter than most, but 
incredibly rewarding, college ca- 
reer, he feels he has many people to 
thank. 

First and foremost, Newpher 
thanks the people with whom he 
worked on many of the campus 
media organizations. The admini- 
stration, of the department, is also 
high on his list. 

Newpher would also like to offer 
some reassurance to the students 
who might be wondering about that 
real world out there that we keep 
hearing so much about, "The real 
world exists and sometimes it's only 
a phone call away." 

As a show of faith in the quality of 
the Clarion graduate, he extends the 
invitation for anyone to send a 
resume to him. He'll try to get the in- 
formation to the appropriate people. 

His address is: Jeff Newpher, 1206 
Brookfield Lane, Mansfield, Texas 
76063. 

Goodbye, Jeff, and good luck! 

NEWS TIP? 
2380 




Jeff Newpher, Clarion University student, receives job at KXAS in Texas. 

Photo by Chuck LIzza, photography editor 



Lady Spikers in PSAC's at Boro 



Clarion's women's volleyball 
team, coached by Sharon Daniels- 
Oleksak, enters its stretch-drive this 
week when it hosts Edinboro Univer- 
sity on Wednesday evening for a 7 
p.m. match at CUP's Tippin Gym- 
nasium. The Golden Eagles enter 
that match with an overall record of 
16-9 and a sixth ranking in the 
NCAA's Division II East Region. 
The Edinboro match signals the be- 
ginning of the final four matches of 
the year for Clarion prior to the 
PSAC-Western Division Playoffs 
which will be hosted at Edinboro be- 
ginning Friday, Nov. 2. 

"We have played some good vol- 
leyball at times this year as eviden- 
ced by our 16-9 record," echoed Dan- 



iels-Oleksak, "but I really believe 
we can be much better. The errors 
we are making are certainly cor- 
rectable ones and that's what we will 
be working hard on improving in the 
next week." 

The NCAA Division II East Rank- 
ing is as follows: 

I.James Madison 

2. St. Augustine's 

3. Slippery Rock 

4. Pembroke State 

5. UMBC 

6. CLARION UNIVERSITY 

The Golden Eagles are using a 
very balanced attack in 1984, with all 
nine team members contributing 
from time-to-time. Co-captains El- 
len Borowy (SR, Elyria, Ohio) and 



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Susie Seanor (JR, Jeannette, PA) 
are providing leadership. Borowy, a 
third-team CoSida Academic All- 
America in 1983, is second on the 
club in spike kills with 184 and is 
third with 73 sets. Seanor, 
meanwhile, is leading the Eagles in 
"kills" with 187, blocks (90) and ser- 
vice aces with 36. 

Also giving strong support up front 
are hitters Wendy Moeslein (SO- 
Pgh, Baldwin), Barb Buck (FR, Ba- 
den, PA) and Maureen Huber (SO, 
York, PA) Moeslein has 88 "kills" 
and 39 blocks. Buck 63 "kills" and 25 
blocks and Huber 88 "kills", 124 
"digs" and 49 blocks. 

Setters Karen Banks (SO, Pgh- 
Plum) and Janet Sobeck (SR, North 
Huntingdon, PA) are tops in their 
categories. Banks leads the Eagles 
with 841 "sets", plus has 16 service 
aces while Sobeck has contributed 
701 "sets" and 18 service aces. 

Also figuring in the action are Sue 
Anderton (SO, OU City, PA) and 
Joyce Kozusko (JR, Pgh-Plum). An- 
derton, an outside hitter, has 28 
"kills", 53 "sets", 15 blocks and 10 
service aces. 

Qarion closes its regular season 
hosting Edinboro Wednesday, at 
Mercyhurst to face the Lakers and 
California University this Saturday, 
hosts Allegheny College on Tuesday, 
Oct. 23 and is at the Edinboro Tour- 
nament on Oct. 26-27 before the 
PSAC-West Playoffs begin at Edin- 
boro on Nov. 2-3. All the Western Di- 
vision teams will participate in the 
PSAC-West Playoffs with two teams 
emerging with the right to play for 
the PSAC Title which will begin on 
Nov. 9-10 at a site yet to be deter- 
mined. The top two teams from the 
East will meet the top two from the 
West for the PSAC Title. 






Swim teams select 
captains for 1984-85 



THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984-17 



Clarion University's talented 
swimming teams, which have com- 
piled spectacular winning records 
over the last decade, have announc- 
ed the men's and women's team cap- 
tains for the 1984-85 season. 

Selected as captains of the men's 
team, which is coached by Bill Mil- 
ler, are Vic Ruberry (Somerset, 
Bermuda) and Tom Ramage (North 
Huntingdon, Pa.) Captains of the 
women's squad, under head coach 
Becky Leas, are Alisa Woicicki 
(Truckville, Pa.) and SueLynn 
Langdon (Pleasantville, N.Y.-Ral- 
eigh,N.C.). 

Miller enters his seventh year as 
the Gk)lden Eagles head coach after 
leading the 1984 team to a record 
third place finish at the NCAA Di- 
vision II National Championships 
and Clarion's 14th straight PSAC 
Title. Ruberry, a senior who spe- 
cializes in the 100-yard and 200-yard 
breaststroke, recently highlighted 
his swimming career by competing 
in the 1984 Olympic Games for his 
native Bermuda. At Clarion, Ruber- 
ry has won All-American honors 
seven times and set the team record 
for the 100 breaststroke at Division 
II Nationals last year with a time of 
56.70 seconds. A two-time All-Amer- 
ican last year, Vic also captured the 
PSAC Title in the 100 and 200 breast- 
stroke. Vic carries a double major in 
Biology and Psychology at CUP. 

Ramage, a senior who specializes 
in the 100-yard and 200-yard back- 
stroke, was fourth in the 100 and 
seventh in the 200 at the PSAC 
Championships last year. Formerly 
a swimmer for Miller at Norwin 
High School before Miller came to 
Clarion, Ramage is a BCIS (Bus- 
iness Computer Information 
System) major at Qarion. He was al- 
so coached by Dave Rider at Norwin. 

"I think we have two excellent 
captains," commented Miller. "We 
have a quality senior group this 
year, which really made selecting 
our captains a difficult job. They 
(Ruberry and Ramage) should be 
good leaders for us in the coming 
year," added Miller. 

Leas, who begins her sixth year at 
Clarion, has an unprecedented five 
straight Division II National Cliam- 
pionships under her belt in as many 
seasons. The (]k)lden Eagles also 
have won nine straight PSAC titles. 

Woicicki, a junior, has had an out- 
standing career earning two NCAA 
Division II National Titles and 
records as part of the 1983 400 free 
relay team and the 1984 200 free 
relay team. She has earned All- 
American status nine times in her 
career and swam to three individual 
AA honors last year by placing 
fourth in the 200 free, sixth in the 100 
butterfly and 12th in the 100 free. She 
also took five firsts, a second and a 
th ird place finish at the PSAC 
Championships last year. A C!ompu- 
ter Science major at Clarion, she is a 
product of Bishop Hoban High where 
she was coached by Susan Cav- 
anaugh. "She is a real asset to our 
team. Her tremendous fight and 
mental toughness are an inspiration 
to the rest of the team. I look for big 
things from her this season," com- 

Sports Tip 
2380 



mented coach Leas. Alisa is the 
daughter of Catherine Woicicki. 

Langdon, a junior originally from 
Pleasantville, N.Y., but now 
residing in Raleigh, N.C., has also 
made a significant contribution to 
the Golden Eagles her last two 
years. Specializing in the 100 and 200 
backstroke, she also helps Clarion in 
the 200 and 400 I.M. and the 100 but- 
terfly. As a freshman she earned All- 
America honors three times by plac- 
ing fifth in the 200 backstroke, sev- 
enth in the 100 backstroke and tenth 
in the 50 backstroke. In 1984 she 
placed sixth in the 200 back. Com- 
peting in her specialties, coach Leas 
is also looking for Langdon to con- 
tribute in the 200 and 400 medley re- 
lays. "She is one of the finest swim- 
mers to come through our pro- 
gram," commented Leas. "She is an 
excellent team person and is willing 
to work hard to reach her goals. I 
look for SueLynn to blossom into her 
own as a top backstroker in 1985," 
added the Eagles coach. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Howard 
Langdon and is a Communications 
major at Clarion. 




l^^ 



Number 12 Bob Green can't find the handle on this pass against lUP. See page 20 for all the action. 

Photo by Eric Hill 

SAD BUT TRUE 

Here we are at one of the 
finest universities in the U.S. (sup- 
posedly consisting of weli-roundecJ 
individuals). Yet, some of the stu- 
dents are not responsible enough 
to seek maximum quality while minimizing their 
cost. Yes, some students and even faculty care so 
little about their money that can be seen going 
downtown to eat skinny, little burgers. NOW, WE 
ASK YOU, don't they love good food at low prices 
with good service? 

We agree the majority of the students and 
faculty do. To those thousands we serve, we sin- 
cerely believe you ail have the potential to be suc- 
cessful. Because you recognize "VALUE" and you 
recognize us. 

We are 

The Eagles Den 

Riemer Center, Clarion University of Pa. 

226-2406 

Open Weekdays 7:30 a.m.-Il :00 p.m. 



18 - THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



Women's tennis team to 
compete in PSAC playoffs 



By Elaine Beach 



The Clarion University women's 
tennis team will compete in the 
PSAC Women's State Championship 
this weekend in Hershey, Pa., Oct. 
19 and 20th. 

Finishing the season with a record 
of 4-8 does not inhibit the team's 



hopes of having a successful show- 
ing,*because the record is not a true 
indication of the girls' talents. Coach 
Norbert Baschnagel is aware that 
the Golden Eagles are not 
considered a favorite contender in 
the States, but they are still deter- 
mined to overcome these tribula- 
tions and give 200 percent. 



Last year in the tournament the 
Golden Eagles finished 11th and the 
goal this year is to improve that 
standing. Coach Baschnagel states 
the team plans on "preparing well 
and doing the best we can," and 
most of all, "represent Clarion to the 
fullest of our ability." 



ALF golf tourney "good time" 



The Autumn Leaf Festival Men's 
Amateur Golf Tournament, held at 
Mayfield on Oct. 7, turned out a six- 
team tie at five under par 67. 

TTie first place team of Brian Jor- 
dan, Keith Pemrick, Dave Galey 
and Rolf Johnson won the sudden 
death playoff with a birdie in the No. 
12 hole. 

The five other teams were deter- 



mined by a scorecard playoff. Th ey 
include: 

Second Place: George Frasher, 
Larry Kifer, Curt Aldrich, and Bill 
Laird; Third Place: Vancheri, 
McMurdy, Levy, and CappozzoUi; 
Fourth Place: Bob Mun^y, Alan 
Wein, Bob Bums, and Lanny Fields; 
Fifth Place: Jim Channels, Joe 



Agostinelli, George Abemethy, and 
Herm Fitschen; Sixth Place: Jeff 
Lenar, Al Solle, Ray Shingledecker, 
and Bill Eckert. 

Twenty eight teams participated 
in the tournament. Mayfield 
manager Tom Ritts reported, "We 
had a full field and everyone had a 
good time. 




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Harvey Hall, CUP 
226-2380 




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Notice: Only ONE Entry Per Contestant 



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CONTEST RULES 

1) All entries must be received in the office of tlie aarion Call on tlie Friday following publication 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently enrolled at Clarion University «r be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimilies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant picking the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involving the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be final 

NAME 



ADDRESS. 



PHONE NUMBER. 



Hackers wrap up season 



By Jeff Harvey 



The Clarion University golf squad 
wrapped up its exhibition season by 
taking first place in the Pennsylva- 
nia State Athletic Conference Fall 
Tournament at Lock Haven, Oct. 9. 

Eight universities competed in the 
tournament and finished in this 
order: Clarion, Slippery Rock, East 
Stroudsburg, Millers ville, West 
Chester, Blo(Hnsburg, Lock Haven, 
and^ppensburg. 

Bill Sarsfield received medalist 
honors for the tourney by shooting a 
73 for the Golden Eagles. Placing 
behind Sarsfield at Lock Haven 
were: Don Dimoff, 75; Mike Czap, 
75; Bruce Chase, 75; Jim Alcibiade, 
80; Barry Chase, 81, and Pete Leene, 
83. 

Five players earned medalist 
honors for Clarion during the fall 
exhibition season. Winning top 
awards were: Don Dimoff, Mike 
Czap, Bruce Chase, Bill Sarsfield, 
and Jim Alcibiade. 

Clarion head coach Frank Lignelli 



was pleased with the overall per- 
formance of his team during the ex- 
hibition season. Lignelli feels the 
Golden Elagles have a good shot at 
capturing the PSAC West title in the 
spring season, with only lUP and 
possibly Slippery Rock standing in 
their way. 

The Golden Eagle golf team will 
open up its regular season in the 
Naval Academy Invitational Tour- 
nament April 4 and 5. The remainder 
of the schedule will include: April 12 
and 13, Wooster College Invita- 
tional; April 16, Slippery Rock Invi- 
tational; April 20 and 21, Penn State 
Invitational, and April 23, Indiana 
Invitational. PSAC and NCAA Divi- 
sion II championships will follow 
regular season play. 

Joe Boros, who golfed for Clarion 
University under Frank Lignelli last 
year, recently captured first place in 
a Mid-Atlantic Golf Tour tourna- 
ment at Fayettville, N.C. Boros, who 
plays out of Pinecrest Country Club, 
won the $3,500 first prize as the 
result of a 69-71-140 p«-formance and 
a sudden death playoff victory. 





THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 - 19 



ALF tennis tournament "huge success" 



By Shelly Eckenroth 



From left to right: Byron Rabb, Keith Rabb, Lynnt Fye, Suzie Fritz and 
Steve Fritz. Photo by Eric Hill 



The Autumn Leaf Festival brings 
many thoughts to mind, such as the 
parade, the homecoming football 
game, and food. But there has been a 
new addition to the Autumn Leaf fes- 
tivities this year. The annual 
Autumn Leaf Tennis Tournament, 
initiated by Coach Norbert Basch- 
nagel, took place at Campbell tennis 
courts from Oct. 12-14. 

The tournament was open to both 
college students and the community. 
Baschnagel expected 50 partici- 
pants, however an overwhelming 120 
people showed up for the towna- 
ment. 



Harriers host Grove City and Mercytiurst 



By David Pound 



The men's cross country team 
hosted Grove City and Mercyhurst 
on Saturday at Memorial Stadium. 
The Golden Eagles defeated Grove 
City 22-38, and shut out Mercyhurst 
15-45. 



Garion set the pace early by lead- 
ing the pack and kept the pace all 
through the race. 

Senior co-captain Scott DeLaney 
finished first with a time of 26:13. 
Placing third overall and second for 
Clarion was Jim Snyder at 26:31. 
Doug McConnell placed fifth at 




Number 15 Pat Carbol passed for 209 yards but lUP still prevailed. 

Photo by Chuck Llzza, photography editor 




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26:42. Bob Smith was sixth and Greg 
Garstecki seventh. Following Gar- 
stecki for Clarion was Pelligrino, 
Ciccarello, Chris Kern, and Mark 
Marawski. 

Clarion placed in the 1, 3, 5, 6, 7 
positions in their 22-38 defeat of 
Grove City, and took the first five 
positions against Mercyhurst. There 
were 29 runners competing in the 
event. 

Coach Bill English was very pleas- 
ed with the outcome of the meet, and 
stressed that Jim Snyder ran his 
best race of the year and is getting 
stronger with each meet. Senior, co- 
captain Bob Smith, nursing a 
possible stress fracture, still fin- 
ished fourth for Clarion. Chris Kern 
who placed sixth for Clarion, has 
been placing consistently all year 
for the Golden Eagles. 

The team ran well as a group, and 
accomplished what Coach English 
has emphasized all season, running 
grouped together. 

This Saturday, Clarion travels to 
Mansfield where Mansfield, Slip- 
pery Rock, Lock Haven, and Clarion 
will be competing. Coach English 
said this will be the biggest test of 
the season for the Golden Eagles. He 
stated their main goal is to stay 
grouped together, and keep the pace 
of the strong and powerful runners 
of Slippery Rock. 



The different events of play in- 
cluded men's and women's singles, 
men's and women's doubles, and 
mixed doubles. After the five- 
member committee, including 
Baschnagel and other tennis author- 
ities seated their choice of the four 
top players, the rest were picked 
randomly. 

Normally a tennis match is played 
best two out of three, however due to 
the number of participants, the 
matches were determined by 10 
game pro-set. 

Dr. Bill Ross opened the tourna- 
ment by throwing in the first tennis 
ball. Trophies were awarded to the 
first and second place winners and 
all participants received Autumn 
Leaf Mugs. 

The final results for the events 
were as follows: Keith Rabb, men's 
singles; Susie Fritz, women's sin- 
gles; Rabb and Rabb, men's dou- 
bles; Fritz and Fye, women's dou- 
bles and Fritz and Fritz, mixed dou- 



bles. 

A highlight of the tournament 
came when Byron Rabb met his son, 
Keith Rabb for the men's singles 
title. Byron Rabb, who has compet- 
ed against such well-known compet- 
itors as Stan Smith fell to his son 6- 
4, 6-4, for the first time in his tennis 
career. 

Coach Baschnagel said, "The 
tournament was a huge success, we 
had an overwhelming turnout and 
the weather was great. The players 
were all good and I'm already looko- 
ing forward to next year's tourna- 
ment." 



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20 - THE CLARION CALL, Thursday, Oct. 18, 1984 



Big Indians rout Eagles, 56-16 



By Mike Kondracki 

Indiana University of Pennsyl- 
vania rolled up 432 total offensive 
yards to defeat the Golden Eagles 
56-16 before a Homecoming crowd at 
Clarion Memorial Stadium. 

Quarterback Bob Kiel completed 
nine passes out of 14 attempts for 189 
yards, and running back Jim Cal- 
houn gained 115 yards rushing to 
lead the Indiana offense. Pat Carbol 
was eight out of 24 for 209 yards 
passing for the Golden Eagles. 

Indiana was given excellent field 
position throughout the day by out- 
standing special teams play, par- 
ticularly the play of Kelvin Lewis. 
Lewis returned eight Clarion punts 
for 138 yards, and was largely re- 
sponsible for Indiana's strong de- 
fensive play as well, as he had two in- 
terception returns totaling 88 yards. 

Bob Green led in total yards re- 
ceiving as he had seven catches for 
197 yards and the two Clarion touch- 
downs. Phil Bujakowski was another 
bright spot for the Golden E^agles, as 
he punted 11 times for an average of 
45.9 yards. Eric Fairbanks added a 
field goal for the Golden Eagles to 
round out the Clarion scoring. 

Indiana looked impressive from 
their opening drive as they took the 
opening kickoff, and began their 
first possession at their own 20 yard 
line. After two running plays lUP 
was faced with a third down and six 
situation, and running back Jim Cal- 
houn got them the first down and 
much more, as he took the ball on a 
sweep play and advanced it to the 
Clarion 43. From there Kiel kept it 
himself on an option play to the 36, 
and Calhoun carried for two more on 
the next play. A penalty against 
Clarion on the next play, and a run 
by Dave Seidel moved the ball to the 
Qarion 20. Kiel then advanced the 



ball to the 12-yard line, but the lUP 
threat was halted as Lorenzo Burrus 
picked off a Bob Kiel pass on a third 
and 10 play. 

Clarion took over on their own six- 
yard-line, but three plays later they 
were forced to punt. Bujakowski's 
punt was returned to the Qarion 40- 
yard-line by Kelvin Lewis. 

Calhoun and Seidel combined on 
the first five running plays on this 
drive to advance the ball to the 
Clarion 10-yard line. From there 
Seidel carried again for a gain of one 
yard, and Calhoun carried on the 
next play off an option pitch from 
Kiel for a nine-yard touchdown run. 
Ron Dominick added the extra point, 
and lUP led 7-0. 

There was no return on the follow- 
ing kickoff and Clarion took over on 
their own 20-yard-line. Once again it 
was three plays and punt for the 
Golden Eagles, and lUP took over on 
the Qarion 49 after Lewis' 22-yard 
return of the punt. 

Kiel completed a pass to Gregg 
Brenner good for 42 yards to the 
Qarion seven-yard-line, and lUP 
had a first down and goal to go from 
there. On the next play John Hughes 
dropped Dave Seidel for a loss of two 
yards back to the nine-yard-line. 
Kiel then completed a nine-yard 
touchdown pass to tight end Bill 
Thompson, and Dominick added the 
extra point with 1:17 left in the first 
quarter. 

There was no further scoring in 
the first quarter, and the score re- 
mained lUP 14, Clarion 0. 

John Rice intercepted a halfback 
option pass by Jim Calhoun at the 
start of the second quarter, and re- 
turned it to the Clarion 30-yard line. 
Pat Carbol then completed a 12 yard 
pass to Scott Ickes to the 42, and a 11- 
yard pass to Bob Green. The drive 



stalled here as Carbol's next attempt 
was intercepted by Paul Scruppi, 
who lateralled the ball to Kevin 
McCorkle who returned it to the 
Clarion 10 yard line. Three plays 
later Dave Seidel carried for a one- 
yard touchdown run. Dominick's 
kick advanced lUP's lead to 21-0. 

Indiana scored again with 9:34 left 
in the second quarter. Kelvin Lewis 
returned a Phil Bujakowski punt to 
the Clarion 25-yard line. Calhoun 
scored from here on the next play as 
he took the ball off the left side and 
scampered for a 25-yard touchdown 
run. The point-after attempt was 
good and lUP took a commanding 
28-0 lead. 

Clarion put their first points on the 
board on their next possession. Clar- 
ion began after the kickoff at their 
own 14 yard line. Carbol's pass was 
complete to Bob Green, but Green 
was dropped for a loss of five yards 
on the play. Clarion was faced with a 
second down at their own nine yard 
line. Carbol's next pass was com- 
plete to Green, but this time it was 
good for 91 yards and a Qarion touch- 
down. The pass Dlay tied the Qarion 
record set against lUP in 1982, when 
Kevin Hanlon completed a 91-yard 
pass to Terry McFetridge. Eric 
Fairbanks' extra point made the 
scoreIUP28,aarion7. 

Clarion added a field goal with 
2:20 left in the second quarter to 
bring the score to 28-10. The field 
goal was set up after a Qarion punt 
was fumbled by Kelvin Lewis. The 
fumble was recovered by John Mar- 
shall at the lUP 39. Carbol com- 
pleted a pass to Green, and Elton 
Brown carried to the 16-yard line, 
but this was as far as the Golden 
Eagles could get on this possession 
and Eric Fairbanks was called upon 
for a 33-yard field goal. The half 



ended with the score lUP 28, Qarion 
10. 

Indiana came out as impressive in 
the second half as they did in the 
first, and after the Golden Eagles 
punted away their first possession of 
the third quarter, lUP had the ball 
on the Qarion 43-yard line. Five 
plays later Kiel completed a 17-yard 
touchdown pass to Gregg Brenner, 
and lUP led 35-10 with 11:19 left in 
the third quarter. 

Clarion took over on their own 20 
following the kickoff. Brown carried 
for a gain of three yards, but on 
second down Carbol was sacked for 
a loss of nine. Carbol's third and 16 
pass play fell off the fingertips of Bill 
Frohlich, and the Golden Eagles 
were forced to punt. Lewis returned 
Phil Bujakowski's 52-yard punt to 
the Clarion 31 yard line. 

Calhoun was dropped for a loss of 
one on a first down play, but Kiel 
completed a screen pass to Seidel on 
the next play which was good for 32 
yards and another lUP touchdown. 
Dominick, who was perfect on the 
afternoon in extra points, added the 
point-after and lUP led 42-10 with 
8 : 48 left in the third quarter. 

Clarion struck quickly on their 
next possession, however. Brown re- 
turned the lUP kickoff to the Clarion 
20-yard line where the Golden 
Eagles took over first and 10. It took 
one play for the Golden Eagles to 
score as Carbol connected with 
Green on an 80-yard touchdown 
strike. Fairbanks' extra point 
attempt was wide right, and the 
score stood lUP 42, Qarion 16. This 
would be the final points the Golden 
Eagles would score in the game. 

The third quarts ended with a 
score 42-16. 

lUP was not finished for the after- 
noon, as they added two more touch- 



downs in the final 15-minutes of play. 
lUP was faced with a second and 10 
situation at the Clarion 26 at the 
start of the fourth quarter. Kiel com- 
pleted a pass to Thompson for a gain 
of 15 yards, but this drive stalled on 
the next play as running back John 
Robinson fumbled and Bob Jarosin- 
ski recovered for Clarion. 

The Golden Eagles took over on 
their own 13-yard line, and Ray San- 
chez carried on the firet play from 
scrimmage. Carbol was then forced 
to scramble on the next play on 
which he gained five yards. A 
penalty moved the ball back to the 
10-yard line and Clarion was faced 
with a second and 14 play. Carbol 
completed a pass to Bob Green for a 
gain of five to the 15-yard line. Car- 
bol's third down passing attempt 
was incomplete, and Clarion was 
forced to punt. 

Following the punt lUP had the 
ball on their own 43-yard Une first 
and 10. One play later Bob Kiel com- 
pleted a 57-yard touchdown pass to 
Brenner. Dominick added the extra 
point and lUP led 49-16 with 12:04 
left in the game. 

Indiana would score one more 
time in this game, and did so with 
1 : 22 left in the game. Kevin Hanlon's 
third down pass was intercepted by 
Bob Walker and returned 24 yards to 
the Clarion 12-yard line. Quarter- 
back Scott Rhodes then connected 
with Neil Ziegler on a fourth and 11 
play for a 13-yard touchdown. Dom- 
inick added his final extra point of 
the afternoon and lUP led 56-16. 
The final gun sounded and the score 
remained 56-16. 

The loss drops the Golden Eagles 
to 4-2 overall, and 2-2 in the PSAC 
West. TTie Golden Eagles travel to 
Ekiinboro this weekend to face the 
Fighting Scots in another PSAC 
West confrontation. 



Clarion's "Spectacular" Autumn Leaf Festival merits state award 





TM 



WklERES IklE BEEF?r 



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38 EIGHTH AVENUE 
CLARION, PA. 



HOURS: 

Sun.-Thurs. 10:30-Midnight 
Fri.-Sat. 10:30-3 a.m. 



Although the 31st Autumn Leaf 
Festival is just a memory in the 
minds of many residents and visi- 
tors, the Pennsylvania State Cham- 
ber of Commerce has elevated it to 
imortal status. 

"Autumn Art Spectacular," the 
31st Autunm Leaf F^tival has been 
selected by the State Chamber for 



recognition in a newly instituted pro- 
gram, oriented to community and 
Chamber coordinated efforts. 

The letter from the Local Cham- 
ber Standards Committee of the 
Pennsylvania Chamber of Com- 
merce extended its congratulations 
to ALF Chairman Paul Weaver and 



the Executive Director, "for attain- 
ing this degree of excellence." 

Programs were judged on baief its 
to Uie conununity, tourism and bene- 
fits to the Chamber of Commerce. 
Letters of support were included in 
the nomination packet representing 
the County Commissioners, Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, Clarion 



Borough, the Clarion Chamber of 
Commerce and the Tourism Promo- 
tion Agency. Individual letters from 
State Representative David Wright 
and 1984 Autumn Leaf Festival 
Qiairman Paul Weaver were also 
supplied. Support material such as 
news clippings. Calendar of Events, 
placemat samples and j^otographs 



augmented Clarion's presentation. 

The award will be presented at the 
68th Annual Meeting of the Pennsyl- 
vania Chamber of Commerce on Fri- 
day, Nov. 2 in Philadelphia. Autumn 
Leaf Festival Chairman Paul Wea- 
ver will be on hand to accept the 
recognition. 




Vol. 56, No. ff 7 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 



ClojUiMu UijmwJitf 0^ PejuiA-jj^wuiO/ 




Alpha Xi asks help to save a friend 



By Susan Fitigerald 



Last week Alpha Xi Delta Sorority 
was approached by one of their sis- 
ters, Tecie Maher, with a request for 
assistance from her family. The 
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta felt that 
they have an extremely worthwhile 
cause and would like to offer the 
same plea to Clarion students, fac- 
ulty, residents, and organizations. 
The following is a paraphrased story 
from the Ambler Gazette, Oct. 10, 
1984, explaining the dilemma of 
Sharon Mullen, Maher's first cousin, 
and her battle with cancer. 

Sharon Mullen, 27, of the Phila- 
delphia area will face the most im- 



portant experience of her life on 
Nov. 12. Sharon will travel to Seattle, 
Wash, to undergo an expensive bone 
marrow transplant which gives her 
the chance to live the normal, 
healthy life taken away from her 
about two years ago when doctors 
discovered she had malignant lym- 
irfioma or cancer of the lymph sys- 
tem. 

When Sharon, her mother and 
brother, Timothy, board the plane 
for Seattle, they hope to be armed 
with prayers from the people of 
Pennsylvania and about $30,000 in 
their pockets. 

The transplant procedure, which 



Man hospitalized 
after Riemer scuffle 



By Susan Ohler 



One man was hospitalized and an- 
other placed in the Clarion County 
jail after causing a disturbance at 
Riemer Student Center on Oct. 13. 

The two men entered Riemer dur- 
ing an activity by the black student 
union, of which they were not mem- 
bers. They then became abusive to 
the females at the activity and were 
escorted from the building. The sub- 
jects re-entered Riemer and began 
to physically assault the females 
present. The assaults were not 



sexual in nature. The people there 
subdued the two men and again took 
them outside, where they were ap- 
prehended by Public Safety. 

After Public Safety's arrival at the 
scene, one man was taken to Clarion 
County Hospital where he received 
four stitches and was kept for ob- 
servation for a possible concussion. 
He was later discharged. The other 
man was taken to the Clarion County 
jail and later released. 

Both men were arrested for public 
drunkenness, underage consump- 
tion and disorderly conduct. 



involves killing all Sharon's bone 
marrow and giving her a portion of 
Timothy's bone marrow which may 
grow within her body, costs about 
half a million dollars. 

The federal government sponsors 
cancer research and will pay about 
$350,000 of the cost. Medical in- 
surance will pay about 80 percent of 
the remaining $150,000. 

While the Fred Hutchinson Cancer 
Center in Seattle will not turn 
Sharon away if the remaining 
$30,000 is not paid up front, all the 
family's available funds will go to- 
ward financing living expenses 
vftdie the three stay on the West 
Coast.' Helene Mullen, Sharon's 
mother, said it will be a three or four 
week stay. 

Though there is a 30 percent 
chance that Sharon Mullen will die 
from the bone marrow transplant, 
the operation offers her a 30 percent 
or better chance for cure. 

"It is not a hard decision to go out 
there," said Siarwi. "If I were to 
continue as I am, I would be slowly 
dying. With the transplant, I have a 
chance of cure." 

Sharon leaves for Seattle on Nov. 
12 and in about four to six weeks the 
family should know if the transplant 
is successful. 

To raise money, the Mullen's have 
contacted some service groups and 
businesses. So far, the family has 
see Fund. . .page 2 




Vendors demonstrate the old fashioned way of making apple cider at the Marienville Oktoberfest. See story on page 8. 

photo by Chuck Lizza 



SSHE requests "no frills;" 
outlines fiscal needs 



The State System of Higher Edu- 
cation (SSHE) will advance an ap- 
propriation request of $266,009,938 
($266.0 million) for Fiscal Year 1985- 
86. The sum, a 6.38% increase over 
the 1984-85 operating appropriation, 
was recommended by the SSHE 
Board of Governors at the Oct. 16 
meeting. 

In a public statement. Chancellor 
James H. McCbrmick said that the 
immediate fiscal needs of the State 
System universities are two-prong- 
ed: General Educational Operation 
and Special Purpose. 

The support for (General Educa- 
tional Operation is a "no frills" re- 
quest for the State System of Higher 
Education. 

"This will be a 'status quo' appro- 
priation, if approved," said Dr. 
McCormick. "Other than required 
labor cost increases, the requested 
funding only anticipates inflationary 
rises for electricity, telephone, and 
other necessary operational costs." 

Additional resources for emer- 
gency-level repairs of neglected fac- 
ilities and replacement of classroom 
equipment are part of the Special 
Purpose category of the 1985-86 re- 
quest. So, too, are initiatives related 
to the State's economy and projects 
designed to enhance minority access 
to System universities. 

There are five major initiatives in 
the Special Purpose category: Criti- 
cal Capital Repairs, Instructional 
Equipment, Library Enhancement, 
Advanced Technology Curriculum 
Development, and Recruitment (of 
minority students and faculty) . 

A $9.9 million appropriation for 
Oitical Capital Repairs covers the 
elimination of problems which 
immediately impact the health and 
safety of the university community. 
It also addresses cost avoidance 
repairs which require immediate at- 
tention (i.e., roof repair and main- 
tenance of buildings and grounds) . 

Instructional Equipment needs 
call for state-of-the-art technology 
for daily study and research, as well 
as replacement of dated instruction- 
al ware. The appropriation request 
is $4.1 million. 

The restoration of libraries to 
their central roles on the university 
campuses is a system-wide need. Li- 
brary Enhancement and moderni- 
zation requires $2.54 million. 




James H. IMcCormick 

photo courtesy SSHE 

Advanced Technology Curriculum 
Development allows for the initia 
tion of programs at the universities 
which will develop solutions to var 
ious economic and environmental 
problems. For this initiative, the 
System requests $2.1 million. 

Finally, the Recruitment area 
appropriation request of $350,000 as- 
sists the 14 System universities in 
meeting the goals of the Pennsylva 
nia Plan for Desegregation. Called 
"one of the highest priorities" for 
the State System, the Desegregation 
Plan sets numerical goals for uni- 
versity students and faculty at each 
of the campuses. 

The Capital Appropriation request 
focuses on projects beyond the 
limited resources of the operating 
budgets of the universities. 

"We ask the (iovernor and Grcner- 
al Assembly for support of projects 
which have been judged critical for 
the ongoing educational opportuni 
ties of students in the State System 
of Higher Education," says Chancel- 
lor McCormick. 

The Capital Appropriation request 
addresses seven (7) areas: 

1. Projects which eliminate health 
and safety hazards ($824,000) ; 

2. Ck)st avoidance measures for the 
physical plant which will reduce 
certain operating costs ($5,319,000) ; 

3. Elimination of architectural 
barriers which reduce accessibilit> 

See SSHE. . .paqe2 






ON THE INSIDE 



Editorial 2 

Hide Park 2 

Campaign '84 3 

Sequelle contest 5 

Finals schedule 7 



Frat honored 8 

Chandler Menu 9 

Halloween features 11 

Pick the Winners 12 

Football 14 



2— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 




When do you be a manager and when do you be a hunnan being? 

This isn't a question for a new edition of Trivial Pursuit, but a full- 
blown issue that has been debated for hundreds of years in politics, 
business and in homes. 

As one learns in Sociology, we all fulfill a number of roles as stu- 
dent/teacher, son/daughter, mother/father, brother/sister, friend/enemy, 
husband/wife, employee/employer - the list is endless - but often roles 
are confused and some are inseparable from others. 

In particular, a person in a management position has to make tough, 
often unpopular decisions, one has to sign one's name on the dotted line 
and take responsibility for that and all actions, and a manager must be 
representative of subordinates. This is a list of tasks not without a de- 
gree of difficulty, especially when problems go home with you and/or a 
grave mistake has been made. 

To cite an example of this role confusion and inseperability, Ronald 
Reagan, as President of the United States, has the awesome task of 
managing a nation - one numerously subdivided into legislative bodies of 
people, states with various general attitudes, pressure groups, major- 
ities, minorities and the like. This man must be responsive, aware, and, 
as Walter Mondale says of the presidential personality, strong and 
knowledgeable about numerous issues and concems. In his four years as 
President, Reagan has made the necessary tough decisions, has signed 
his name and taken responsibility, has been responsive to Annerica, and 
has been strong and knowledgeable time and time again. 

And Reagan has made mistakes. He has shown that he is human. 
He has said the wrong thing to the wrong person on occasion. He has 
taken his work home with him and has suffered the pain of stepping into 
such a visible position. 

Having recently become a manager, I feel justified in reflecting about 
the ups and downs of dealing with f)eople, making tough decisions, 
signing my name and taking responsibility, and. . .being human. 

What do people with positions of authority do about disgruntled 
subordinates, unskilled-yet-willing workers, phone calls at all hours of 
the day and night, problems of any nature, and. . .mistakes? 

Ronald Reagan is putting in his bid for re-election to the formidable 
position of President not because he is a glutton for punishment, but be- 
cause he tmly believes in what he is doing and in what he knows. He 
wants to be given the chance to be a good manager. 

What a wonderfully simple idea! 

Karen E. Hale 
Editor-in-Chief 



« 



The Clarion Call 



Room 1 Harvoy Hall 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 



Edltortn^Ihief KAREN HALE 

News Editor MICHAEL DOWNING 

Fsatures Editor MICHELE LaTOUR 

Sports Editor CHRIS STURNICK. 

Ptwtography Editor CHUCK LIZZA 



Ad Design Editor ANITA KOTRICK 

Ad Sales Manager CLARKE SPENCE 

Buslrtess Martager PHIL DONATELLI 

. Circulation Manager DENISE SHEEKY . 

Advisor ART BARLOW 

Consulting Editor THERESA WAIDA 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $2.50 

National: Per Agate Line S .34 



iMaii Subscription Rates: 

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Per Academic Year $8 



Funded by Student Activity Fee 





HIDE PA 



Hide Park: A Fable 



Welcome to the Park! I hope you 
like it here. It's a pleasant place for 
a stroll; take in the crisp autumn 
air, the vibrant red, russet and or- 
ange of the changing season, the 
sounds of the wind rattling the Oc- 
tober leaves. 

But there are other sounds in our 
Park - sometimes. Over there, near 
the center among the dark colon- 
nades formed by the trunks of the 
towering trees, wet now with a brush 
of chill rain; over there, in the 
grove, I can just see the outline of a 
small structure; a wooden crate, I 
believe, of the type used for the stor- 
age and shipment of common house- 
hold articles. It's not a particularly 
solid looking structure, but it serves 
our community well. 

It seems that once a week a dif- 
ferent person enters the Park, 



crosses the open reach of lawn, ent- 
ers the grove and ascends this struc- 
ture. It's a mere one step up, but it 
serves us well. 

Once astride our little wooden box 
the person undergoes a wonderous 
transformation. 

T^e words ring out: impressive 
and sonorous. Gesticalating testily, 
our orator drives home a point. Now 
gently, a seed - a new idea ; or, with a 
dilatory nod, a wry quip, the product 
of a scathing wit. 

I sit on one of the benches the Park 
affords and dip deeper into my 
brown bag containing my lunch. I 
punctuate a wild lamentation with 
peeled grapes and save my lettuce 
and honey sandwich for the lengthy 
peroration. 

Finished, the speaker descends 
and leaves. There is no applause, 



nor has a crowd gathered to jeer and 
enter the fray with wild rebuttals. 

The last echoes dies away and the 
chickadees and blue jays filter back 
from the upper environs of the tall 
trees. 

Satisfied, I crumple the wax paper 
and place it in the paper bag, fold the 
newspaper twice so it fits under my 
arm and strike out at a swift pace to 
meet a one o'clock class. 

Later in the day I notice a squirrel 
and two grackles picking through a 
few crumbs left over from the meal. 
But upon my approach they scatter. 

It's a nice place, this Hide Park. 
For only an hour or so each week it's 
a bit boisterous; normally it's so 
quiet you can hear the grass grow. \ 

I like it at Hide Park. Pack a lunch 
and you come too. 

—A. Barlow 
Groundskeeper 



Local groups to 
sponsor business 
conference 

On Oct. 30-31, the Pennsylvania 
Department of Commerce, U.S. 
Small Business Administration, 
Pennsylvania State Chamber of 
Commerce, and other state and local 
agencies and business associations 
are sponsoring "Oj^rtunities '84," 
at the Pennsylvania Small 
Business/Procurement Conference 
at the David L. Lawrence Conven- 
tion Center, Pittsburgh, PA. The 
statewide conference features work- 
shops on procurement opportunities, 
financing, technol<^ and legisla- 
tion plus up to 170 exhibits by federal 
and state agencies and private com- 
panies interested in contracting for 
products and services of small bus- 
inesses. Advance registration is $75 
and covers seminars, exhibits and 
lunches for both days. For a reg- 
istration flyer or information, call 
the SBA at (Harrisburg) 717/782- 
3840; (Pittsburgh) 412-644-5441; 
(Philadelphia) 215/596-5893; 
(WUkes-Barre) 717/826-6497; or the 
Pennsylvania state Small Business 
Action Center 717/783-5700. 



Fund... 



■ ■ 



(Continued from Page 1) 

raised $2,600 toward the operation 

cost. 

"We would appreciate help in any- 
way," said Helene Mullen, "What 
we really need are people's prayers, 
but if someone can give a Uttle, we 

SSHE.. 

(Continued from Page 1) 

for the handicapped ($1,363,000) ; 

4. Major renovations and remod- 
eling to upgrade existing facilities 
($17,441,000); 

5. Restoration, remodeling, al- 
teration, and expansion of existing 
facilities to accommodate program 
changes ($11,184,000) ; and 



really need it." 

Any donations or inquiries may be 
sent to: Sharon Mullen Fund, c/o 
Alpha Xi Delta, Box 447 Riemer, 
Qarion University of PA, Qarion, 
PA 16214. 



6. Furniture and equipment 
($314,000). 

The total Capital Appropriation 
request is $36,445,000. 

•niere are 645 university buildings 
on the 14 campuses and branch cam- 
puses in the State System of Higher 
Education. 




College Press Service 





P 



I 



WHflfwSiraiiR a»«wEm'«i\aERR»»waiBER? 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984—3 



By Michael J. Downing 



People come up to me week after 
week and ask me questions about 
this Campaign '84 column. This 
week I'm going to attempt to answer 
those questions. I'm also going to 
register a complaint against those 
inquisitive minds and others like 
them. 

Q. Are you a Democrat or a Re- 
publican? 

A. I am a Republican, registered 
in Clarion County. I am also con- 
templating a change to Democratic 
status. 

Q. When is the Republican side 
going to show itself in your column? 

A. Well, it will, very soon. I am 
now gathering data. 

Q. Why are you so hard on Rea- 
gan? 

A. The reason that I am so hard on 
Reagan is that an incumbent is easy 
to attack. Anything that is wrong 
with the Union at this time can be 
blamed (directly or indirectly) on 
the Reagan Administration. If my 
father is out of work; who should I 
blame? Mondale? I hardly think so. 
Mondale has done nothing to affect 
the immediate state of the nation. 
Reagan has. Mondale is not a part of 
the administration in power and 
Reagan is and this is what makes 
him subject to the fullscale attack 
of my pen. 

Q. What are your main sources of 
information? 

A. My sources are The Pittsburgh 
Press, The Clarion News, The U.S.A. 
Today, {^one numbers of various in- 
dividuals within both major parties 
and the editing {M-ocesses of my own 
mind. 

Q. Why don't you like Ronald Rea- 
gan? 

A. Ronald Reagan is probably a 
fine, honest individual. But he and I 
disagree on many political subjects. 
I am a student; he has cut student 
aid. I am a pacifist; he is a hard- 
nosed fighter. I come from a middle- 



class neighborhood; I see my neigh- 
bors losing their jobs and abandon- 
ing their plans for the future. I see 
an administration (that Reagan is 
responsible for) which has appointed 
individuals like Alexander Haig and 
James Watt. These men did not fit 
into their positions and therefore re- 
signed. How many similar instances 
are there still existing within this 
administration? I also believe in 
strong foreign-relations; Reagan 
prefers to be somewhat of an isol- 
ationist. There are my major points 
of difference. 

Q. WeU, is Walter Mondale any 
better? 

A. From my position, he is better. 
He plans to give our educational sys- 
tem a boost. He plans to develop 
some kind of foreign-policy. He 
plans to reduce the deficit. My main 
worry is: Can he carry out his pro- 
mises? 

Those are the major questions. 
Now for my complaint: Why are all 
of those questions asked vocally? 
When they are asked vocally, no one 
else knows about them. Why can't 
they be written down and sent to The 
Call? I would be glad to answer the 
questions directed to my desk. 

Our newspaper is a public forum 
that reaches more than 5,500 
students each week. Let's get these 
issues into the open. Let the world 
know how you feel. It takes no more 
than 20 minutes to write down a few 
ideas, type them, and slip them 
under the office door. 

Week after week I cry out against 
apathy of the public regarding pol- 
itics. Week after week I encourage 
student involvement in politics and 
in self-expression. The results are 
zero. 

It is ironic for me to think that: If 
the Supreme Court elected to take 
away our freedom of speech, there 
would be a massive revolution. Yet 
most of us treat this right as if it 
never even existed. 



Fulbright Research Grants 
open until mid-January 



The 1965-86 competition for Ful- 
bright Collaborative Research 
Grants will close on Jan. 16, 1985. 
Only a few more weeks remain for 
qualified teams of two or three U.S. 
graduate students or recent post- 
graduate researchers to apply for 



tity sponsoring the research, and 
must also include evidence of affil- 
iation with a host country institution 
or on-going project. 

Application forms and further 
information for students currently 
enrolled in Qarion University may 



th^ 6 to 10 mon^h research grants be obtained from the Fulbright Pro- 
...•-._.- , L,- ._ _i, . . _ gram Adviser, Dr. Totten, who is 

located in 323 Peirce Hall. The dead- 
line for filing applications on this 
campus is Nov. 14, 1984. 



which are available to all countries 
of the world where conditions per- 
mit. 

Applicants must be U.S. citizens at 
the time of application, and must 
hold a bachelor's degree or the 
equivalent before the beginning date 
of the grant, and may not have ob- 
tained the Ph.D earlier than June, 
1962. Researchers in the creative 
and performing arts need not have a 
degree, but must have at least four 
years of relevant training and/or 
experience. Applicants in medicine 
must have an M.D. degree or its 
equivalent (e.g., O.D., D.D.S.) at the 
time of application. All applicants 
must have sufficient proficiency in 
the written and spoken language of 
the h<»t country. 

Applications must be endorsed 
and submitted through a U.S. aca- 
(temic institution or professional en- 



Student Senate discusses 
campus building inspections 



By Daren Ayers 



The Student Senate of Clarion Uni- 
versity have held four meetings 
dealing with several school activi- 
ties. President Debbie Briggs pre- 
sides over the meetings as the panel 
of Senators discuss relevant sub- 
jects of concern. 

Inspections of several classroom 
buildings and dormitories by the 
Building Inspection Committee was 
a main topic of this week's meeting. 
Becker Hall, Still Hall, and Riemer 
Student Center all received excel- 
lent ratings while the majority of the 
rest of the buildings received good 
ratings. Becht and Ballentine Halls 
received the lowest scores of the 
buildings which was a fair rating. 
Venango Campus was honored with 
a very good score. 

The Senate has expressed its 



concern for the safety of the stu- 
dents. They have looked into the up- 
keeping of lights and doors on 
campus. They have also discussed 
the prevention of assaults on 
campus by looking into an escort 
service for students. The Senate 
wishes to advise discretion when 
walking at night. 

The Senate has also improved the 
school by upgrading student needs 
and services. A second doctor was 
installed at the Student Health Cen- 
ter, Dr. Barnes. The Senate has 
recognized Delta Chi fraternity as 
an official campus organization with 
Bill Lloyd as their advisor and has 
expected PUSH'S (People 
Understanding Situations of the H 
andicapped) constitution. 

Breakifast has been expanded and 
improved to include jams, fresh 
fruit, and bagels. Lights have been 



fixed on campus and also installed 
on Greenville Avenue behind Peirce 
parking lot. They have appropriated 
money to the Athletic Department 
for the payment of video equipment, 
to the Clarion wrestling cheerlead- 
ers for new uniforms, and to MENC 
(Music Education National Confer- 
ence) for their budget. The Senate 
has recognized 339 full time faculty 
this year, 258 of them teaching. 
Finally, the Student Senate would 
like to congratulate Kim Clark, this 
year's Homecoming queen, and the 
rest of the court. 

The Student Senate holds its meet- 
ings on Monday at 109 Dana Still at 
6:30 p.m. and invite all to attend. 
They also invite suggestions by stu- 
dents on campus activities. The sug- 
gestion box can be found outside of 
the Senate offices on the second floor 
of Egbert Hall. 



SSHE adopts mission statement 



An eight-point "Mission for the 
Pennsylvania State System of High- 
er Ekiucation (SSHE)" met approval 
by the SSHE Board of Governors 
last week. The Board adopted the 
mission statement during public 
meeting proceedings at Shippens- 
burg University. 

In citing the mission of the public 
universities in Pennsylvania, Chan- 
cellor James H. McCormick com- 
mented that the document grew in 
part from the enabling legislation 
for the 14-month old System, Act 188 
of 1982. 

"The mission, the charge of this 
organization," said McCormick, "is 
to provide high quality education at 
an affordable cost. 

"It is our responsibility to carry 
out the mandate of Act 188, but there 
is more to what each of the 14 uni- 
versities has accomplished during 
their long histories." 

2. To provide undergraduate and 
graduate instruction for students to 
and beyond the master's degree in 
liberal arts, sciences, and profes- 
sions and other applied fields, includ- 



GYN 
UPS 



ing the teaching profession, with op- 
portunities for research, artistic ^- 
fort, and scholarly achievement and 
personal growth consistent with the 
legislated mission of the System, 
and graduate instruction at the doc- 
toral level as provided by Act 188 of 
1982. 

3. To provide upper division oppor- 
tunities for students who obtain the 
first two years of postsecondary edu- 
cation at other institutions. 

4. To provide associate degree pro- 
grams, including preprofessional 
transfer preparation, essential to 
serve unmet educational needs in 
particular geographical areas. 

5. To provide continuing education 



and community and public services 
in accord with the needs and aspir- 
ations of citizens and the social, cul- 
tural, economic, and technical needs 
of the Commonwealth. 

6. To meet specialized, state-wide 
educational needs and provide 
public services to the Common- 
wealth, responding as a System or in 
cooperation with other Pennsyl- 
vania colleges and universities. 

7. To serve as regional social, in- 
tellectual, and cultural centers. 

8. To participate in and help pro- 
vide leadership for the economic re- 
vitalization and development of the 
Commonwealth. 




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4-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 25, 1984 



Evidence shows campus heckling 
of Mondale is organized effort 



Walter Mondale's supporters, 
seemingly as heartened as they are 
upset by their candidate's recent 
reception on college campuses, are 
charging Republicans organized stu- 
dent disruptions of recent Mondale 
speeches at Southern Cal, the Uni- 
versity of Texas at Arlington and the 
University of Illinois. 

"The evidence is strong to suggest 
(the heckling and disruption of Mon- 
dale appearances on campuses) is 
an organized political effort," says 
Bill Morton, president of the Na- 
tional College Democrats in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

"A majority of signs (on different 
campuses) are very similar," he 
says. "Some of the same words are 
misspelled." 

A private Republican group, the 
Leadership Institute, headed by a 
former aide to Ronald Reagan, held 



a campaign seminar for young 
people in Washington in August, and 
trained students to disrupt Mondale 
campaign appearances, contends 
David Schauer, 24, who attended the 
seminar. 

Schauer, who now works for a 
Democratic congressional candi- 
date in Iowa, says students were 
instructed how to position them- 
selves within crowds to draw atten- 
tion away from Mondale, how to 
write placards to tie Mondale to the 
Jimmy Carter administration, and 
how to disavow any connection to the 
Reagan campaign in the process. 

Schauer has a tape recording of a 
seminar session at which an uniden- 
tified female seminar leader — who 
Mondale student coordinator Gary 
Brickman says is Reagan-Bush 
Campaign Youth Director Liz 
Pickens — urges the students to 



Clarion students arrested 



By Lisa Capello 



On Oct. 18, the Clarion Borough 
Police charged two male CUP 
students for the corruption of minors 
and for having sexual liberties with 
a 14-year-old girl. The two men were 
Kevin C. Daugherty, a resident from 
Monroeville, Pa., and William Carl 
McTague, a resident at HoUidays- 
burg, Pa. The minors were two fe- 
male residents, age 14 and 16, who 
were earlier cited for minor alcohol 
violations. After investigating, the 
police discovered that one of the 
males had allegedly taken sexual 
liberties with the 14-year-old girl. 
Kevin Daugherty was charged for 
this offense and also transporting 
the girls to a location where they 
were served with alcohol. William 
McTauge is alleged to have provided 
alcohol to both juveniles but has not 
been charged in connection with any 
sexual offenses. 

The following are other occur- 



ences that the Clarion police 
reported: 

During the ALF carnival, a 16- 
year-old resident of Summerville, 
Pa., was arrested for minor alcohol 
violations and public drunkenness. 
While attempting to release the ju- 
venile to an adult relative, a fight 
erupted between the juveniles. Sub- 
sequently, the individuals were sub- 
dued and one was arrested for dis- 
orderly conduct. James Anthony 
Vallies, a 21-year-old from Summer- 
ville, Pa., was later released and no 
injuries occurred. 

James Michael Brown, a 26-year- 
old resident from Pittsburgh, Pa., 
has been charged for the violation of 
the Drug Act. He attempted to pass a 
prescription for Percocet tablets at 
Rea and Derick Drug Store and a 
fradulent prescription at Klingen- 
smith Drug Store. Brown is current- 
ly in the Venango County Prison on 
similar charges filed by Oil City 
Police and New Bethlehem Police. 



"just say 'I'm a concerned citizen.' 
Don't say 'I'm with Students for 
Reagan'.'" 

The Republicans deny they are in- 
volved with the heckling, which has 
included shouted interruptions of 
Mondale speeches. 

Asked if his campaign was 
involved in the heckling, President 
Reagan last week said, "Good lord, 
no. I wish people wouldn't do it. It's 
rude, and it shouldn't be done." 

Leadership Institute head, Morton 
Blackwell denies his seminars 
taught such tactics, calling them 
"stupid and embarrassing." 

"The (people) from our office 
were not involved," adds Jack 
Abramoff, head of the College Re- 
publicans. "We sent out a memo that 
said if you go to Mondale events, 
don't get involved." 

"The people who did it," he says, 
"were a combination of rowdy types 
and those who just joined in. It's just 
a bunch of people who don't like 
Mondale." 

The College Republicans' pro- 
tests, he says, have tended more to- 
ward the silly, with a group of CRs 
dressed as "Fritzbusters" touring 
some campuses and, outside Mon- 
dale's address at George Washing- 
ton University last week, having the 
"Student Anti-Boredom Coalition" 
dress in pajamas, and handing out 
No-Doz and coffee to passersby . 

"That's what he says," repilies 
Brickman of Mondale's campaign. 
"( Abramoff 's) not going to say 'Ya, 
we were behind it and we encourage 
it'." 

The actual number of incidents 
has been small. The worst episode 
was at Southern Cal in mid-Septem- 
ber, where about 100 protestors 
brandished signs like "Moscovites 
for Mondale" and yelled so persist- 
ently that the candidate had to de- 
part from his prepared speech. 




RED STALLION 

I, BIG 
HALLOWEEN 
PARTY 

yVednesday, Oct. 3 1 

WCCBNITE: 

• 25* Drafts 

• Door Prizes and Awards 

• Best Costume Prizes 
Sponsored by: 

US Tobacco, Shreck-n-Ghost 
and National Record Mart 

• Prizes Galore 

• Kill-the-Keg 




He is called Satan or Lucifer. He searches for evil. Cruelty and destruction 
are his deeds. The most powerful force in the universe is his worst enemy. 
It's the devil that I'm referring to, and he will soon be making a visit to Clar- 
ion. CB presents the one-man show written and performed by Scott Keeiey: 
"The [tovil You Say?", on Thursday, Oct. 25 at 8:15 p.m. in the chapel. It is an 
evening you will remember, as the devil amuses and charms you. He weaves 
together excerpts from Milton, Twain, Dostoevsky, Melville and the Bible 
Into a thoroughly devastating self-portrait, photo courtesy of Center Board 

Wachob claims key 
fund provision ignored 



state Rep. Bill Wachob (pronounc- 
ed WAH-cub), a candidate for U.S. 
Congress in the 23rd District, called 
"deeply disturbing" the results of a 
General Accounting Office study 
that shows that the Reagan Admin- 
istration ignored a key provision of 
the Superfund law requiring health 
studies near toxic waste sites. The 
1980 Superfund law required the De- 
partment of Health and Human Ser- 
vices to set up an agency to compile 
a registry of diseased people near 
toxic waste sites so that the health 
effects of toxic chemicals could be 
pinpointed. 

The GAO, which is a bipartisan in- 
vestigating branch of Congress, 
found that the Administration 
declined to provide the agency with 
enough money. As a result, accord- 
ing to Rep. Florio, who is the chief 
architect of the Superfund legisla- 
tion, no health studies had been com- 
pleted and funding cuts prevented 
the agency from computerizing its 
information so it could properly col- 
lect data. 

Rep. Wachob said, "This is a pro- 
found threat to the people of the 23rd 
District, with its three Superfund 
sites; this confirms what the citiz- 
en's group in Lock Haven has been 
saying. Citizens in Lock Haven 
asked the federal government in the 



Spring of 1983 to provide a health 
study and screening. Mr. Clinger at 
that time said he would go to the top 
of the EPA to get action. But be- 
cause there was no federal action 
forthcoming, the Pennsylvania State 
Department of Health had to step in 
last year and begin its own study." 

Rep. Wachob noted that under 
pressure this past Spring from citi- 
zens from State Representatives 
Letterman and Wachob, the health 
department began a formal health 
screening as well. 



Rep. Wachob said that incumbent 
Congressman dinger's voting 
record, in committee and on the 
House floor, on the Superfund bill as 
well as his recent statements of sup- 
port for the Administration's polic- 
ies are "appalling." The statement 
Rep. Wachob was referring to, was 
quoted in the Daily Collegian of Oct. 
17. Rep. Clinger said, "I am very en- 
thusiastic about the platform and 
the way the Republican party is 
going to shape the county and the 
nation." Wachob said, "In terms of 
the environment,! in terms of toxic 
waste contamination, in terms of 
public health, the policies of this 
Administration and of the incum- 
bent congressman pose a threat to 
our health and safety." 



Thomburgh commits funds 
to clean up Chesapeake Bay 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984—5 



Pennsylvania Gov. Dick 
Thomburgh and U.S. Environmen- 
tal Protection Agency Regional 
Water Director Alvin R. Morris re- 
cently inaugurated the Pennsylva- 
nia regional portion of the cleanup of 
the Chesapeake Bay with the com- 
mitment of $2 million in state and 
federal funds. 

Morris, regional head of the bay 
restoration program, presented 
Thomburgh with a $1 million federal 
check, which the Commonwealth is 
matching doUar-for-dollar, to 
provide assistance to farmers along 
the Susquehanna River in nutrient 
management and erosion control. 

"Pennsylvania's commitment to 
do our fair share in the cleanup of 
the Chesapeake Bay begins at the 
source — the Susquehanna River, 
which provides 8.2 billion gallons an- 
nually, or approximately 50 percent, 
of the fresh water entering the bay," 
Thomburgh said. "Although Penn- 
sylvania does not border the bay, we 
play a vital role in preserving this 
national treasure as a viable econo- 
mic and environmental resource of 
the country." 

"Pennsylvania's initiative in tack- 
ling the non-point source pollution 
problems of pollutants going into the 
Susquehanna River, is a significant 
st^ toward reducing the bay's over- 
load of nutrients which use up oxy- 
gen needed by aquatic life," Morris 
said. "We are encouraged by their 
commitment to implementing the 
findings of the Chesapeake Bay stu- 
dies." 

lliomburgh pointed out that the 
regional approach to restore the bay 
grew out of a "mini-summit" 
meeting he hosted in June 1983 at his 
official home overlooking the Sus- 
quehanna. It was there that 
Maryland Gov. Harry Hughes, Vir- 
ginia Gov. Charles Robb, Thom- 
burgh and EPA agreed to push for a 
cooperative, regional approach to 
problems affecting the health of the 
bay. The three governors also ini- 
tiated the three-day conference in 
Fairfax, Va., in December of that 
year, and it was there that an agree- 
ment, including EPA and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, was formalized. 

Thomburgh said Pennsylvania 
will use the funds to educate farmers 
and fund projects in state-of-the-art 



techniques to reduce runoff, apply 
fertilizer and manage animal waste. 
"Pennsylvania has made significant 
gains in reducing acid mine drain- 
age and sewage treatment plant dis- 
charges into the Susquehanna River 
Basin during the last two decades," 
said Thorabui'gh, noting that the 
Commonwealth has provided more 
than $250 million in federal grants 
for municipal sewage treatment 
plants discharging into the Chesa- 
peake Bay Basin. 

"Now, we must tackle the prob- 
lems of runoff, or nonpoint source, 
pollution," the governor said. "We 
want to keep Pennsylvania soil on 
Pennsylvania farms and prevent the 
nutrients vital to high crop yields 
from being lost to the bay." 

Pennsylvania's $2 million bay 
restoration program includes: 

—$1,050,000 to assist farmers in 
controlling excess wastes and ero- 
sion through a cost-sharing pro- 
gram; 

—$635,000 for education, through 
demonstration projects and promo- 
tional programs; 

—$200,000 for nutrient manage- 
ment assistance on the local level. 

—$115,000 to monitor water quality 
and conduct watershed studies. 

Thomburgh cited EPA statistics 
showing soil losses from untreated 
cropland in the lower Susquehanna 
River Basin (below Sunbury) may 
be as high as 17.7 tons per acre per 
year, over three times the average 
soil loss of 5.5 tons per acre per year 
in the Commonwealth. "Our volun- 
tary program with the agricultural 
community can help reduce these 
soil losses and save money in fer- 
tilizers," he said. 

According to "Pennsylvania 
Farmer" magazine, holding fertiliz- 
ers and other nutrients on cropland 
could save farmers $90 million a 
year, at $2,200 for a farm in the 
Susquehanna watershed. 

Thomburgh noted that the Execu- 
tive Council responsible for restor- 
ation of the bay, including repre- 
sentatives from Maryland, Virginia 
and the District of Columbia as well 
as Pennsylvania and EPA, will hold 
its third meeting in the York County 
community of Wrightsville Oct. 18. 



American Chemical Society 
liosts open iiouse 



The student Affiliate Chapter of 
the American Chemical Society at 
Clarion University will hold its an- 
nual open House Friday, Oct. 26, 
from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the third 
floor of Peirce Science Center. 

"nie open house is open to the pub- 
lic. Approximately 300 students 
from 20 high schools will also be at- 
tending. Further information can be 
obtained by contacting the chemis- 
try department at 814-226-2281. 

Demonstrations and discussion 
sessions will include: a Nuclear 
Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer, 
a Perkin-Elmer 621 Infrared Spect- 
rometer, an Atomic Absorption 
Spectrometer, glass blowing, a 
Varian EM600 Mass Spectrometer, a 
Hewlett-Packard Graphics Ter- 
minal, an Apple Microcomputer 
Demonstration, a Waters High Per- 
formance Liquid Chromatograph, a 
Hewlett-Packard Microprocessor- 
Controlled Gas Chromat(^rai^ and 
software exhibition and demonstra- 
tion for high schools. 



A special planetarium show, "The 
Dawn of Astronomy," will be pre- 
sented at 10:45 a.m., noon, and 1:15 
p.m. The show describes the astro- 
nomical significance of ancient con- 
structions such as the pyramids and 
the rock formations at Stonehenge. 

A tour of the chemistry depart- 
ment will also be presented, along 
with refreshments. 




The 1984-85 Sequelle yearbool( is conducting a "Group Picture Contest." Every recognized group on the Clarion campus 
is eligible. The contest will be judged on four separate divisions. Each division winner (four in all) will receive a prize of 
$25. The categories are: 1) Groups under 25; 2) Groups 25-50; 3) Groups over 50, and 4) Greeks. The criteria for winning: 
Creativity, Originality, Good Taste, Uniqueness and group participation. Each picture will be judged by the Sequelle Ex- 
ecutive Board. A professional photographer will be available to take the group pictures on Nov. 5, 6, 7, and 8. The loca- 
tion of the picture is the decision of the group but mut be either on campus or in town. Only the group pictures entered in 
the contest will go in the 1985 yearbook. Each group must sign a time and place when the photographer is here. No se- 
cond sittings will be granted so each group sould pick a time the most group members can attend. Sign-up is located 
outside the yearbook office in 4 Harvey Hall. If you have any questions call the yearbook office at 226-2427. 



Miss USA applications 
accepted until Dec. 10 



Applications are now being ac- 
cepted from all over the Keystone 
State for the annual Miss Pennsyl- 
vania USA Pageant to be staged for 
the seventh time in Greensburg, Pa., 
in the Grand Concourse of the West- 
moreland Mall, March 6, 7, 8, and 9. 
The Miss Pennsylvania USA Pag- 
eant is an official Miss USA - Miss 
Universe Contest. 

There is no "PERFORMING 
TALENT" requirement, all judging 
is on the basis of poise, personality 
and beauty of face and figure. 
Entrants who qualify must be at 
least 17 years of age and under 25 
years of age by May 1, 1985, never 
married, and at least six month res- 
idents of Pennsylvania, thus college 
dorm students are eligible. All girls 
interested in competing for the title 



must write to: Miss Pennsylvania 
USA Pageant, Tri-State Headquar- 
ters. 347 Locust Avenue, 
Washington, PA 15301 by Dec. 10. 
Letters must include a recent snap- 
shot, a brief biography and phone 
number. 

The girl chosen as Miss Permsyl- 
vania USA will receive a 14-day all- 
expense paid trip to Lakeland, Fla., 
the site of the Miss USA Pageant, 
and mil represent the Keystone 
State in the Miss USA Pageant na- 
tionally televised on CBS-TV in May. 
The new winner will receive a $1,000 
Cash Scholarship and choose a $1,200 
wardrobe among her many prizes. 

Application Deadline is Dec. 10. 




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BEAUTIFUL, VISIT US NOW. WE HAVE A 

CONSIGNMENT OF SPECIAL DIAMONDS 

AT VERY SPECIAL PRICES. 

JAMES JEWELERS 

DOWNTOWN CLARION 

USE OUR LAY -AV^ AY 



6-THE CLARION CALL, Ctarion, PA Thursday, Oct. 26, 1984 



dinger endorsed by veterans 




Bill dinger 



Clarion Call File Photo 



U.S. Rep. William F. Qinger, Jr., 
(R-Pa), has received the endorse- 
ment of the political division of the 
national Veterans of Foreign Wars 
(VFW) in his bid for re-election to a 
fourth term in the U.S. House of Rep- 
resentatives. 

dinger, who scored a 92 percent 
approval rating from the VFW, said 
the published voting records of 
every member of Congress were 
compared to the position taken by 
delegates to the VFW's national con- 
vention. 

The Congressman has received 
favorable ratings from the VFW in 
previous years. 

"I'm honored and pleased to re- 
ceive this endorsement from one of 
America's biggest and best known 
veterans organizations," said 
Clinger. "America's veterans 
should not have to take a back seat 
to anyone, and they won't either, as 
long as the American people con- 
tinue to elect people to Congress who 
exhibit a genuine interest in helping 
to safeguard the rights of those, who 
in wartime, helped to safeguard 
ours." 

TOMORROW IS 

THE LAST DAY 

TO DROP CLASSES 

WITH A "W" 




Alpha trivette does Alpha Trivette: The Clarion Comedy Club features co- 
median and impressionist Alpha Trivette, who will perform Wednesday, Oct. 
31 at 9 p.m. in the Eagles' Den. Come see him impersonate all your favorite 
stars! 



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543 MAIN STREET 226-4435 



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$1 off any cut with ad 

Offer expires Nov. 8th 




Wachob backs Mondale campaign 



By Nancy Vmbaugh 



State Rep. Bill Wachob, a candi- 
date for U.S. Congress in the 23rd 
District, presented his views on a 
few major issues of the upcoming 
November election, last weekend in 
Clarion. 

On the national level, Rep. Wa- 
chob supports the Mondale/Ferraro 
ticket. He feels that this admin- 
istration offers the "best hope", es- 
pecially in Pennsylvania. Rep. Wa- 



chob feels that Western Pennsyl- 
vania can benefit through the eco- 
nomic development of the Mondale 
Administration. 

Another reason Wachob backs the 
Democratic ticket is because of 
"their strong cwnmitment to educa- 
tion on all levels." He also noted that 
the Student Loans Aid Program, 
which strongly lacks in the Reagan 
Administration, can be brought back 
by Mondale. 

Lastly, the main issue that 







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Wachob favors in the Mondale/Fer- 
raro campaign is their views on 
Arms Control. Wachob said, "We 
are already a militarily strong coun- 
try and we should continue peace 
through negotiations." Whereas he 
stated that the Reagan Administra- 
tion is repeatedly authorizing fund- 
ing for more missiles. 

On the local level, Wachob said the 
Superf und — clean up of waste areas 
— needs to be stronger. The fund 

needs to address the victims' rights 
in court and compensation for dam- 
ages. 

Rep. Qinger, Wachob's opponent, 
voted to reduce the Superfund in- 
crease and exempt all the oil indus- 
tries from paying taxes. Since 
reauthorization of the fund hasn't 
passed in Congress there's not ade- 
quate funding to complete many of 
ttie projects, including the Clarion 
site. 

The whole project was decided by 
five or six votes. Wachob feels his 
vote would have made a difference 
and possibly more clean-ups could 
be in progress. 

A debate to address the citizens of 
this area to Wachob's views, as well 
as those of his opponent, will be tele- 
cast on Nov. 1. 

Clinger refused to debate Wachob 
in all 12 counties, but agreed to one 
televised debate. 

Wachob feels that debating in each 
of the 12 counties would've address- 
ed the issues on a more local basis. 
Since Clinger refused, Wachob 
hopes the one televised debate will 
help make the citizens more aware 
of the campaign issues. 

Being ALF weekend, Wachob 
commented on the festival as a 
whole. He said, "It's great, the fes- 
tival demonstrates long tradition." 
He also felt that the fair is good be- 
cause it brings community and gov; 
«iunent tc^ether. 



Make-up day scheduled 
forfinal'exams 

Students who find they have three finals on a particular day and see it 
to be a real difficulty may use Friday, Dec. 21 as a make-up day. Please 
fill out the form below and return to the Office of the Registrar in Carrier. 
The staff will study options and adjustments will be made. 



Name 



S.S. Number. 



Local Address 

Monday Tests: 

8 a.m. 

10 a.m. 

12 N 



Local Ph. No. 



2 p.m. 
4 p.m. 



INDICATE COURSE TITLE 

Wednesday Tests: 

9 a.m. 

11 a.m. 

1 p.m. 

3 p.m. 



Night Course 



Night Course, 



Tuesday Tests : 

8 a.m. 

11 a.m. 

2 p.m. 



Thursday Tests: 

9:30 a.m. 

12:30 p.m . 

3:30 p.m 



Night Course - 



Night Course, 



Please return form by November 9th. Thanks. 

Finals Schedule: Fall 1984 Semester 

All final examinations must be given during finals week, Dec. 15-21, 1964. 

EVENING CLASSES are designated as classes which meet at 4:15 p.m. or later. During finals 
week, the tests will be eiven at the same time and duration as usual class meeting. Monday eve- 
ning courses will give finals Monday evening, Dec. 17; Tuesday evening courses will give finals 
Tuesday evening, Dec. 18; Wednesday evening courses will give finals Wednesday evening, Dec. 
19; and Thursday evening courses will give finals Thursday evening, Dec. 20. If the same evening 
course meets twice a week, the final is given on the evening of the first class meeting ; i.e. Monday- 
Wednesday evening courses test at usual class time on Monday, Dec. 17; Tuesday-Thursday eve- 
ning courses test at usual class time on I'uesday, Dec. 18. All tests will be given in the same room 
in which the class meets all semester. 

DAY CLASSES are designated as classes which meet as early as 8 a.m. and as late as 4 p.m. 
Finals examination periods are two hours long, and the tests will be given in the same room in 
which the class meets all semester. 

*If the first class meeting of the week is on a Monday or Wednesday at the following times: 8 
a.m., 10 a.m., 12 noon, 2 p.m., 4 p.m., the final test will be given Monday, Dec. 17 at the regular 
class times. In other words, the 8 a.m., M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 8 a.m.-lO 
a.m. Monday; 

the 10 a.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 10 a.m. -12 noon Monday. 

the 12 noon M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 12 noon-2 p.m. Monday. 

the 2 p.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Monday. 

the 4 p.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 4 p.m.-6 p.m. Monday. 

*If the first class meeting of the week is on a Monday or W«lnesday at the following times: 9 
a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m.m, 3 p.m., the final test will be given Wednesday, Dec. 19 at the regular class 
times. In other words, 

the 9 a.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 9 a.m.-ll a.m. Wednesday. 

the 11 a.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 11 a.m.-l p.m. Wednesday. 

the 1 p.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 1 p.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday. 

the 3 p.m. M, W, MW, MWF, MTWRF course test period is 3 p.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday. 

*If the first class meeting of the week is on a Tuesday or Thursday at the following times: 8 
a.m., 11 a.m., 2 p.m.,, the final test will be given Tuesday, Dec. 18 at the regular class times. In 
other worcte, 

the 8 a.m. T, R, TR, TWRF, course test period is 8 a.m.-lO a.m. Tuesday. 

the 11 a.m. T, T, TR, TWRF course test period is 11 a.m.-l p.m. Tuesday. 

the 2 p.m. T, R, TR, TWRF course test period is 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday. 

*If the first class meeting of the week is on a Tuesday or Thursday at the following times: 9:30 
a.m., 12:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., the final test will be given Thursday, Dec. 20 at the regular class times. 
In other words, 

the 9:30 a.m. T, R, TR, TWRF, RF course test period is 9:30 a.m.-U :30 Thursday . 

the 12:30a.m. T, R, TR, TWRF, RF course test period is 12: 30 a.m.-2: 30 Thursday. 

the 3:30 p.m. T, R, TR, TWRF, RF course test period is 3:30 p.m.-5:30 Thursday. 
There are a few courses which meet at times not indicated in above text. These courses will give 
finals in the periods their beginning class times are closest to in the above schedule. 

For example, courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 8:25 a.m. will test Tuesday, 
Dec. IsatSa.m.-lOa.m. 

The courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 9 a.m. will test Thursday, Dec. 20 at 9: 30 
a.m.-ll:30a.m. 

The courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 10 a.m. will test Thursday, Dec. 20 at 
9:30a.m. -11:30a.m. 

The courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 12 noon will test Thursday, Dec. 20 at 
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. 

The courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 1 p.m. will test Thursday, Dec. 20 at 
12 : 30 p.m.-2 :30 p.m. 

The courses which meet Tuesday and/or Thursday at 2:30 p.m. will test Tuesday, Dec. 18 at 2 
p.m. -4 p.m. 

The courses which meet Monday and/or Wednesday at 11:10 a.m. will test on Wednesday, 
Dec. 19 at 11 a.m.-l p.m. 

The courses which meet Monday and/or Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. will test on Wednesday, Dec. 
19 at 3 p.m. -5 p.m. 
Ail finals meet in regularly scheduled classrooms. 



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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984-7 

Computer 
aidsSequelle 

The Sequelle has recently 
received access to a word process- 
ing computer package. The system 
includes a word processor, speller 
and indexer. It will aid the Sequille 
staff in simplifying copy and layout. 
It can also correct errors by high- 
lighting misspelled words. The 
system will check the spelling of all 
student and faculty names. The in- 
dexer gives the staff the access to 
the location of any given person in 
the yearbook. It can also move para- 
graphs or words in order to fill copy 
space requirements. 

The software package can be used 
on an Apple I or II computer, and all 
information is stored on a floppy 
disk, which can be sent to the com- 
pany. 



Representing APSCUF are Professors Joseph Grunenwald, President of the 
Clarion University Chapter of APSCUF; Nadine Oonachy, State Vice Presi- 
dent of APSCUF; Bill Wachob, candidate for Congress in the 23rd District, 
and James Knickerbocker, State Chairperson of APSCUF's committee for 
action through politics. 

APSCUF endorses Wachob i 



By Mike Callaghan 



APSCUF— the Association of 
Pennsylvania State College and Uni- 
versity Faculties— endorsed Bill 
Wachob .for Congress in the 23rd 
District at an Oct. 16 meeting held in 
the English Department in Carlson 
Library, Clarion University. 

APSCUF represents the faculties 
of the 14 state-owned universities in 
Pennsylvania, which together con- 
stitute the State System of Higher 
Education. The reason for 
APSCUF's involvement with Repre- 
sentative Wachob is that most of 
these 14 state universities are lo- 
cated in rural areas, and APSCUF is 
interested in the welfare of the uni- 
versities. This leads to another par- 
ticularly strong interest of 
APSCUF: the election of able lead- 
ers in these areas from rural voters. 
The campuses in these rural areas 
represent primary resources of edu- 
cational services and culture and 
provide a vital element in the eco- 
nomic health of the communities in 
which they are located. 

Representative Wachob believes 
in public higher education, which he 



has already established in his prior 
service in the 75th District in the 
Pennsylvania House of Represent- 
atives. APSCUF believes that his 
proven record of service to higher 
education and to the community 
makes him the most qualified to 
serve in Congress. 



Library Hours 

Additional study hall hours have 
been added to the Carlson Library 
schedule this term. The library will 
be open on a study hall basis from 10 
p.m. to midnight Sunday through 
Thursday. The full schedule of hours 
is as follows: 

Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m.- 
Midnight* 

Friday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 

Saturday: lla.m.-5p.m. 

Sunday: 2p.m.-Midnight* 

♦Study Hall Only 10 p.m.-Midnight 
(Service points closed) 





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8-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 



Marienville's Oktoberfest wilkomens 



By Chris Minder & Peg Cudz U 

"Wilkomen," meaning welcome in 
German, invited all to Marienville's 
second annual Oktoberfest, held Oct. 
19, 20, and 21. 

The Oktoberfest was enhanced 
with Bavarian music, German food 
and beverages, arts and crafts, an- 
tique dealers and various demon- 
strations. 

Bavarian music was piped out of 
the Bucktail Hotel which featured 
the Chernick and Jeanette Bavarian 
Band plus music from the Clarion 
University Band. The music set the 
German mood to enhance 
Germany's favorite pastimes - eat- 
ing and drinking. 

Not only did the wonderful aroma 
escape from the Bucktail Hotel and 
Kelly's Restaurants, there were also 



street vendors tempting the taste- 
buds with homemade apple cider, 
funnel cakes, apple pie and sand- 
wiches. 

After filling the stomach, one 
could visit the various arts and 
crafts booths which were set up 
ready to sell Christmas knick- 
knacks, ceramics, and handmade 
gifts. 

A Christmas display was brought 
all the way from Smethport to par- 
ticipate in this year's Oktoberfest. 
Other arts and craft booths were 
journeyed from Punxsutawney, 
Brookville, and Summerville. Most 
of the booth owners were satisfied 
with their business transactions and 
were planning to return next year. 

Along with the arts and craft 
booths were the antique dealers. One 
in particular, Mr. Bauer, a Marien- 



ville resident, has a very impressive 
antique bottle collection. His display 
features the bottles he has spent 
years collecting. 

Along with the various booths, 
demonstrations also took place. A 
Scotland sheep dog show was per- 
formed at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on 
Saturday and Sunday. Blacksmiths 
showed their wares and homemade 
apple cider demonstrations aug- 
mented the atmosphere. And a knit- 
ting machine demonstration was 
open to onlookers. 

Approximately 400 people attend- 
ed Marienville's Oktoberfest. Next 
year's Oktoberfest is tentatively 
scheduled for the end of September. 
The idea for the Oktoberfest was de- 
veloped to promote tourism after a 
major glass plant closed in the town 
of Marienville. 



C.U.P. frat initiated by nationals 



By Tim Slaper 



Clarion's chapter of Delta Chi Fra- 
ternity officially became part of the 
national fraternity Oct. 5, after 
going through the fraternity's tradi- 
tional initiation ceremony. 

The Delta Chi's work was not over 
yet, though. In order to be 
recognized as a campus organiza- 
tion by the university, they had to be 
voted upon by Student Senate. They 
were accepted by a unanimous vote 
last Monday, and they are now 
designated as a colony. 



They hope to be recognized as a 
chapter by their national headquar- 
ters by the end of this academic 
year. 

The group, along with their 
advisor, William Lloyd, (who is also 
a faculty member), were officially 
initiated by Delta Chi's chapter at 
Penn State. Mr. Lloyd felt that to be 
their advisor, he should also be a 
member of the fraternity. "After the 
ceremony people approached me 
and asked if I had actually gone 
through with the initiation. They 
were all surprised when I said 




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'yes'," stated Lloyd. Mr. Lloyd feels 
that every chapter advisor should be 
a member of the fraternity he 
advises. Lloyd has a Delta Chi 
jacket that he wears around 
campus. 

Qarion's chapter of Delta Chi was 
formed when Jay Slobodzian, an as- 
sociate member of Delta Chi, trans- 
ferred here from Gannon Univer- 
sity. He teamed up with Pat Griffith 
(president) and Chris Waltenbough 
(vice-president), to organize and 
form an interest group, later to go 
through pledge ceremonies. 

At present, Delta Chi has 28 active 
members and seven pledges. They 
are planning to start a Little Sisters 
branch of the fraternity. 

The chapter is also looking for a 
house in which to hold their social 
activities. They hope to secure one 
by this May. 

Delta Chi was founded at Cornell 
University of Ithica, N.Y., on Oct. 
13, 1890. The fraternity was original- 
ly for legal students, and they 
emphasized law and justice. Some 
years later, in 1921, they became a 
social fraternity, and eventually ex- 
panded to over 70 chapters nation- 
wide. 




LNIVIEIPSITr 



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r^ r^ 226-7200 

Oct. 31st: Bud Light - Fright Night 
MUG AND FIRST BEER ONLY $1 

Refills only 20' 

YOU KEEP THE MUG!! 

Time: 8:00-? 

Prizes for best costume! 

So spend Halloween with us. 





; 



Blacksmith demonstrates his worit at the Marienviiie Octoberfest heid 
Oct. 19, 20 and 21. photo by Chuck Lizza, Photography Editor 




Newly initiated Delta Chi's include: Patricic McClaf ferty, Vince Paslde, Chris 
Waltenbaugh, Patrick Griffith, William Lloyd, faculty advisor Mark O'Angelo, 
Dave Rastik, Michael Cardella and Michael Palicia. 

photo by Chuck Lizza, Photography Editor 



Classifieds 



Lost: 35mm camera in a brown Can- 
non leather case. If found please 
call 226-7608.$$ reward. 

Help Wanted: Campus rep to run 
spring break vacation trip to Day- 
tona Beach. Earn free trip and 
money. Send resume to CoDege 
Travel Unlimited, P.O. Box 6063 
Station A Daytona Beach, Flor- 
ida 32022. Include [^one numbers 
please. 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50,553/ 
year. Now hiring. Y our area. Call 
805-687-6000 Ext. R-6334. 

Is it true you can buy jeeps for $44 
through the U.S. Government? 
Get the facts today! Call (312) 742- 
1142 Ext. 3701. 



"Be strong in the Lord and in the 
strength of His might. Put on the 
whole armor of God, that you may 
be able to stand against the wiles 
of the devil." Efdi^ians 6: 10-11. 

The First Amendment guarantees 
freedom of religion, not freedom 
from it. 

Saturday Koinonia Christian Fel- 
lowship will be having the Annual 
Halloween Party in Riemer 
Coffeehouse at 7:30 p.m. Prizes 
will be awarded for best costumes. 

Lost: Jean jacket with waUet and 
important I.D. Please call 226- 
8578. Reward. No questions asked. 



ALLEGHENY WOMEN'S CENTER 

an out patient medical clinic offering 
Abortion — asleep or awake 

• Morning After Treatment 

• Birth Control 

• Related Services 

PHONE 412/362-2920 



mn 



Uegheny 
omen's 

Center 



Medical Center East Buflding 
Penthouse Right (8th floor) 
211 North Whitfield Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15206 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984-9 



New additions change Chandler Dining Hall 



By JCathy LeMunyon 



Clarion University students will 
soon see some changes at Chandler 
Dining Hall, according to Dr. Donald 
Nair, the Vice-President for Student 
Affairs, and Bob Mozzi of the 
Student Senate Food and Housing 
Committee. These changes were 
brought about through the combined 
efforts of the Committee and Servo- 
mation, who holds the contract for 
food services at Chandler. 

After many years of non-use the 
fountains located near the water 
machines will be dismantled. In 



their place will be the new beverage 
stations, which will house water, 
juices, sodas, punches, ice cream, 
an automatiac ice maker, (Tones, and 
plates for ice cream, all in one area, 
Servomation will also install a 
soup bar in the cafeteria, thus 
eliminating the distribution of soup 
in the regular food line. The unit 
includes soup pots, toasters capable 
of holding bread, bagels, and 
English muffins, and warming 
ovens where the dinner rolls will be 
available. Servomation hopes to be 
able to attach this unit to the salad 
bar, but because of electrical diffi- 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY. Oct. 25 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Smoked Bacon Slices, Farina, Cinnamon Ptolls, Toasted Waffles 
w/Hot Syrup, Links of Sausage, Raisin Muffins, Cream Filled Donuts. 
LUNCH : Scotch Barley Soup, French Onion Soup, Hot Ham on Bun, Beeferoni, Potato Chips. 
DINNER: Scotch Barley Soup, French Onion Soup, Roast Beef, Chicken Stew w/Dumpling, 
Tomato Wedges, Noodles au gratin, Lima Beans. 
FRIDAY, OCT. 26 

BREAKFAST: Cantaloupe (Grapefruit half when Cantaloupe is not in season) Bacon and Cheese 
Omelette, Cream of Wheat, Coffee Cake, Fried Potatoes, Diced Peaches in Syrup, French Cin- 
namon Toast w/Hot Syrup, Jelly Roll. 

LUNCH: Manhattan Style Clam Chowder, Cream of Spinach Soup, Cheeseburger on a Roll (Sliced 
Cheese w/Sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce), Tater Gems, Fish Sandwich, Com. 
DINNER: Manhattan Style Clam Chowder, Cream of Spinach Soup, Deep Fried Scallops Tacos 
(meat sauce, shredded cheese, chopped tomatoes, onions and lettuce), Green Bean Succotash, 
Oven Brown Potatoes, Yellow Squash. 
SATURDAY, OCT. 27 

BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Bacon, Apricot Sweet Roll, Hot Cakes w/Hot 
Syrup, Frizzled Ham, Fried Potatoes. 

LUNCH: Chicken Noodle Soup, Cream of Tomato Soup, Barbecue Rib Sandwich, Grilled Cheese 
Sandwich, Potato Chips, Whole Leaf Spinach. 

DINNER: Chicken Noodle Soup, Cream of Tomato Soup, Breaded Veal Cutlet, Baked Meat Loaf 
and Tomato Gravy, Peas, Whipped Potatoes, Wax Beans. 
SUNDAY, OCT. 28 

BRUNCH: Fresh Banana, Scrambled Eggs, Thick Sliced Bacon, Sticky Buns, Purple Plums, 
Chili, Hash Brown Pos)tatoes, Citrus Sections, French Toast w/Syrup, Sausage Cake, Bagles 
w/Cream Cheese. 

DINNER : Cream of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Baked Smoked Ham, Macaroni and Cheese, 
Broccoli, Sweet Potatoes, Corn. 
MONDAY. OCT. 29 

BREAKFAST: Cheese Omelette, Bacon, English Muffins, Hot Corn Meal, Fried Potatoes, Waffles 
w/Hot Syrup, Grilled Ham Slices, Cinnamon Nut Cake. 

LUNCH: Homemade Mullegatawny Soup, Potato Chowder, Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich, 
Pizzaburger, Potato Chips, Mixed Vegetables. 

DINNER: Homemade Mullegatawny Soup, Potato Chowder, Baby Beef Liver w/Bacon or Onions, 
Breaded Chicken Cutlets, Carrots, Baked Spaghetti w/Tomato Sauce, (]orn. 
TUESDAY, OCT. se 

BREAKFAST: Banana, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or over. Cinnamon Rolls, Fried Potatoes, 
Peach/Pineappel Compote, French Cinnamon Toast w/Hot Syrup, Cream of Wheat, Bagel 
w/Cream (Jheese. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup, Oyster Stew, Grilled Hot Dog on Roll w/Relish and 
Chopped Onions, Cheese Blintzes w/Sour Cream, Potato CJiips, Sauerkraut. 
DINNER: Homemade Chicken Noodle Soup, Oyster Stew, Roast Turkey w/Dressing and Gravy, 
Salisbury Steak, Brussel Sprouts, Mashed [^)tatoes, Cauliflower. 
WEDNESDAY. OCT. 31 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Banana Bread, Bran Mufflns, Pried Potatoes, Blueberry 
Pancakes w/Hot Syrup, Taylor Pork Roll. 

LUNCH: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Olde English Cheese Soup, Italian Meat Balls on a Bun, 
French Toast w/Sausage Links, O'Brien Potatoes, Hot Cinnamon Appl^. 
DINNER: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Olde English Cheese Soup, Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce, Pork 
Cutlet, Peas & Mushrooms, Au Gratin Potatoes, Cabbage. 



••••••••••• 



:WCCB Night at the: 

j RED STALLION 

: October 31 , Wednesday 







Egg Race, Bob for Apples, 
PRIZES awarded for 
Best Costume. Categories 
including Most Original, 
Ugliest, Group Costunne 
and more. . . 






• ••••••••••••• 



•TOPS* 



1. "Drive", r/»e Cars 

2. "Missing You", Jo/j/j IVa/fe 

3. "She Bop", Cyndi Lauper 

4. "Purple Rain,' Prince 

5. "I Just C9lled To Say 

I Love You", 

Stevie Wonder 



culties, this may not be possible. An 
alternative is to place the soup bar 
where the cereal dispensers are 
now, a move that will be feasible 
because the cereal will be dispensed 
in the regular food line after renova- 
tions are complete. Work on these 
projects is scheduled to begin the 
week of Oct. 22, and will take place 
from 7 p.m. until 7 a.m. so that the 
normal workings of the dining hall 
will not be disturbed. 

Chandler has also made some 
changes concerning the food itself. 
Orange marmalade and a preserve 
are being offered for breakfast on a 
rotating basis. Likewise, Chandler 



also features a rotation of low 
calorie dressings at the salad bar. 
Servomation is also looking into the 
possibility of serving more than one 
hamburger or hot dog at a time. In 
the near future, there will be more 
varieties of bagels offered; and 
many students will be happy to learn 



that Servomation has returned to the 
old recipes for salad dressings and 
potato and macaroni salads, due to 
CUP students' dislike of the new 
recipes. 
According to Mozzi, CUP students 

Chandler changes. . .see page 10 



Only at Clarion 



-is your roommate on a 32 calorie 
no food fiet. Way to go Rat ! 

-does a girl get up at 3 a.m. to look 
for her ceramic pots under her 
roommate's bed. 



r/Mm//My/////My^^^^ 



-does Given 's water tower swallow 
the moon. 

-does the administration allow one 
political party to distribute material 
at Marwick-Boyd and not the other. 










NO 
JIVE! 



To All Clarion Students: 



I must say thank you for treating my friends 

and me so graciously over ALF weekend. We are 

students from lUP and we honestly had the best 

weekend of our lives. 

However, we are somewhat jealous. YOU 

ASK WHY? Well it's because of your restaurant 
known as the Eagle's Den. It was there on Friday 
night that we were introduced to the best sand- 
wiches we have ever eaten. These doubleburgers, 
I believe, are called WOODAS. We thought we'd 
never experience anything so great again, but we 
were wrong. We went back to the Eagle's Den 
on Saturday night and there they were — the 
most unbelievable subs for only $1,751 Needless 

to say we were astonished! 

Now in closing, I must also thank the Eagle's 

Den for providing the fantastic dances commonly 
known as CAB's because I met the most fantas- 
tic people — what an experience! 

So CUP friends, appreciate the quality given 
to you by the EAGLE'S DEN in Riemer Center. 

An lUP Student 



'//////////////////W///S 



10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, TDuraday, Oct. 25, 1964 




I.E. Speakers host ALF Tournament 



By Susan Boll 



Todd Berger, Sigma Chi Brother, and Karen Vommars, Sigma Chi little sister, dribble their share of the 36 hours on 
Oct. 18-19 to benefit the emotionally disturbed children of Wallace Village which is located on the outskirts of Denver, 
Colorado. Out of the 185 chapters of Sigma Chi, approximately 75 percent participate in this fund drive. Sigma Chi's 
donations assist financially in the professional counseling and building of a new gymnasium. Clarion faculty, com- 
munity and student body donate each year to the fund and reached the total of $500 this year. 

photo by Chuck Lizza, Photography Editor 



TTie aarion 'Autumn Leaf I.E. 
Tournament was held on Oct. 19-20. 
at Clarion University. Clarion had 
379 points but as the host school they 
were ineligible for the team award. 
Wayne State University of Detroit, 
Michigan, was the winner with 122 
points followed by West Virginia 
Wesleyan and Wilkes College from 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

In the category of extemporan- 
eous speaking, Brian Kline placed 
second. Trischa Goodnow came in 
second in the dramatic interpreta- 
tion category along with Irma Levy, 
third place; Deb Bartels, fourth 
place, and Rich Gordon sixth place. 

Kline placed second once again in 
the impromptu speech category. 

Receiving top honors in the area of 
persuasive speaking were Dave 
Knapp, first place; Goodnow, se- 
cond place, and Deb Bartels, sixth 
place. 

For prose speaking, Levy, Eric 
White and Dave Knapp all received 
awards, as well as Beth Park and 



Chandler Changes... 



(Continued from Page 10) 



have responded favorably to the new this year, and they both ex- 
changes made at Chandler since last pressed a wish that this behavior 
semester. These changes include would cease. Mozzi also reminds 
hamburgers, hot dogs and french students that smoking is not 
fries at the deli line on a regular permitted anywhere in the cafeter- 
basis, the larger salad bar, and the ia. 

noticed, but not regretted, absence Any suggestions that students 

of the notorious apple fritters and have regarding Chandler Dining 

BBQ rib sandwiches. Hall can be dropped in the sug- 

Both Mozzi and Dr. Nair point out, gestion boxes which Student Senate 

however, that some CUP students sponsors. One of these boxes is 

have taken it upon themselves to de- located in the dining hall itself, 

stroy the tableclothes which are also Thoughts can also be directed to any 



Student Senator, particularly Mozzi, 
Jack Gardner, Andy Restaur!, or 
Jay Rodgers, who serve on the Food 
and Housing Committee. 

In addition, each dormitory has 
representatives to the committee, as 
do off-campus students with meal 
tickets. 

The next meeting of the Food and 
Housing Committee is scheduled for 
Nov. 13, and it is open to all students. 
Contact the Student Senate Office at 
2318 for further details. 



^'f^0 m-itm ^&'^e?- ^w ^0"'<f^0WrT^ **njt #« '^as^ 






Qintted Campus cjUinfet/tij 



Co/tc(ta% tni/iteg you to: 



.>» 



^ "Sunday Night at the Parsonage' 

(Wesley Fellowship) 

Every Sunday, 7:30 p.m. at the home off 
Rev. and Mrs. Leroy Jones 
338 Wood St. (for rides call 226-6662) 

• CUP Fellowship 

Every Thursday, 8:30 p.m. at the home off 
Rev. and Mrs. Dan Michaleic 
47 S. 7th Ave. (ffor rides call 226-5946) 

• Newman Association 

The 1st and 3rd Wednesday off every month at 7:00 p.m. 
Riemer Coffffee House 






Knapp for informative speaking. 

Goodnow and Rich Gordon, also 
winners in the poetry category, 
placed first along with Lisa Linton 
and John Lashua in second place. 
Levy and Knapp took third, and 
White and Bartels, took fourth in the 
dramatic duo category. 

In after dinner speaking, Linton 
took first, Ron Slanina took third. 
Barbels took fourth, Gordon took 
fifth, and Trischa Goodnow took 
sixth. 

The winners in readers' theatre 
were White, Bartels, Linton and 
Gordon, first place. Doris Hazzard, 
Bark and Goodnow, second, and 
Slanina, Kline, Knapp, Levy, and 
Lashua, third place. 

In the pentathlon, which is the 
measurement of an individual's 
achievements in a speech tourna- 
ment, Goodnow came in first with a 
total of 69 points. Followed by Gor- 
don in secong, Knapp in third, Levy 
in fifth, and Linton in sixth place. 

Congratulations to all the parti- 
cipants and best of luck in future 
meets. 




The brothers of Phi Sigma would 
like to thank all the people who made 
our annual Autumn Leaf Party suc- 
cessful. Also, we would like to wish 
the best of luck to our nine new 
pledges this semester: Jeff Antoni- 
celli, John Casoles, Jeff Curtis, Dave 
Ditty, Chris lezzi, Dan Miller, Marty 
O'Neil, Don Scuvotti and Paul 
Severe. 

Delta Zeta 

Our pledges for the fall semester 
are: Lisa Burton, Kathy Doran, 
Laura Halsey, and Bonnie Ki^. We 
think they are great and cannot wait 
to have them initiated sisters ! 

We would like to thank Alpha 
Sigma Tau, Sigma Chi, and the Phi 
Sigs for the mixer on Wednesday, 
Oct. 17 and thanks go to Delta Chi for 
the "punk" mixer on Thursday, Oct. 
18. 

Wednesday, Oct. 21 was our 
Founder's Day dinner at the Holiday 
Inn. 

Also, we will soon be selling pop- 
corn for $2 a package as one of our 
fundraisers, so contact one of our 
sisters if you would like to buy some. 
Sigma l^gma l^gma 

The sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma 
are very excited about the success- 
ful Homecoming weekend. Thank 
you to the Theta Chis for being our 



float building partners. The first 
place float was great. Way to go! We 
were an awesome team. Iliank you 
for inviting us to your house for the 
party and parade. The view was per- 
fect. Thank you to our sponsors: 
Agway and Ron Seidle Chevrolet for 
all their kind support. Our float 
wasn't the only thhi^ shining in the 
parade. We are very honored to have 
the following Sigma representa- 
tives: Lovely sister Kim Clark, 
Homecoming Queen; Missy Rilling, 
Miss CUP; Mary Beth Wuenschel, 
Homecoming Court, and Sue 
McCanna, Cheerleading Captain. 
You girls looked beautiful in the 
parade. Missy was also in the spot- 
light when she sang at the Miss Teen 
Pageant at Clarion High School. Wel- 
coming to our bunch are our pledges: 
Janine Arnold, Lanea Baker, Tracy 
Baker, Elaine Brophy, Sue DeDion- 
isio, Laura Heim, Karen Klapsinos, 
Mary Mealy, Jody Sacriponte, Lynn 
Stupeck, Gloria Smith, Christie 
Zepfel. Good luck girls. A thank you 
is extended to the Phi Sigs, Sig Eps, 
and Delta Zetas for a fun mixer last 
Wednesday. Let's do it again soon. 
Happy Birthday to Debby "Moose" 
Tliomas. If anyone is interested in 
mixing please contact Sue Hotujec 
at 226-6567. 

Fly over to 

Wilshire's 

for all your florist needs 

Wilshire's Flower 
and Gift Shop 

90 Merle St. 
Clarion 

2267070 



escw. MC 



a □ 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984-11 

Kit helps to make positive I.D. 



By Margie Zerhe 



These creatures crawl out of the haunted house in Clarion. The haunted house is open for Halloween chills and thrills. 

photo by Renee Rosensteel 



With all the reported incidents of 
assault on the Clarion campus 
recently, the Identi-kit, located in 
the Public Safety building, will be 
put to good use. 

An Identi-kit is used to make 
composite sketches of criminal sus- 
pects. The kit has been on the 
market since 1961. These kits are 
leased out for $384 per year and are 
currently being used in 15 countries 
and all 50 states. Although the com- 
posites never actually identified any 
one person, they help eliminate 
people who don't fit the exact des- 
cription of a sought-after suspect. 

The Identi-kit contains foils, which 
could be described as plastic sheets. 
There are 504 foils in the kit, making 
it possible to develop over six billion 
different faces. The foils include 
sketches ranging from height and 
age group to hairstyles and facial 
tones. 

When a person comes in to make a 
composite, it can take anywhere 
from 20 minutes to 1 V2 hours. 

The composite sketches can also 
be transmitted to different police 



bureaus through a teletype system. 
Each foil has its own specific code 
numbers, and these numbers are 
typed into a machine. The receiving 
police bureau then reads the code 
numbers and rebuilds the original 
sketch. 

Our Public Safety Bureau has 
used the Identi-kit for helping many 
organizations, such as the FBI, and 
more recently, an armed robbery in 
the New Bethlehem Borough. 

Another asset to the kit is the fact 
that it is updated every few years, 
according to changes in hairstyles. 

The latest advance concerning 
this crime-solving kit is the develop- 
ment of a children's kit, used to iden- 
tify juvenile delinquents and run- 
aways, which will be available to 
police forces in 1985. 



Halloween history buried in cold dark decay 



By Paul Triponey 



The ancient Celtic festival marked 
the beginning of the season of cold, 
darkness and decay. It centered on 
the honoring of Samhaim, the Celtic 
lord of death. The people celebrated 
by building huge bonfires and 
burning croj^, animals, and some- 
times even humans as sacrifices. 
They believed that the souls of the 
dead returned for the evening to 
their earthly homes. The night was 
the eve of November 1, the 
beginning of the Celtic new year. 
And the seemingly grisly celebra- 
tion is the root of what we now know 
as All Hallows Eve, or Halloween. 



Many people mistakenly believe 
that Halloween began as a Christian 
ritual. Actually, it was not until the 
9th century that the festival of the 



dead was incorporated into Chris- 
tian celebration. A feast was fixed 
on November 1 in honor of all the 
saints (All Hallows), and in the 11th 
century November 2 was specified 
as All Soul's Day to honor the souls 
of the dead. It is this pagan-turned- 
Christian celebration, still laden 
with ancient beliefs and traditions 
that constitutes modern-day Hallo- 
ween activities. 

Although most people do not be- 
lieve in ghosts or witches, these re- 
main as the symbols of Halloween. 
There are many possibilities as to 
this connection. It may have been 
the Celts' belief that during the night 
of November 1 demons, witches, and 
evil spirits roamed the earth in wild 
and furious gambols of joy to greet 
the arrival of "their season" - the 
long nights and early dark of the 
winter months. Some people believ- 
ed that ghosts roamed the earth on 



Top college women sought by Glamour 



Clarion University students are in- 
vited to participate in Glamour 
Magazine's 1985 Top Ten College 
Women Competition. Young women 
from colleges and universities 
throughout the country will compete 
in Glamour's search for 10 outstand- 
ing students. A panel of Glamour 
editors will select the winners on the 
basis of their solid records of 
achievement in academic studies 
and/or in extracurricular activities 
on caminis or in the community. 

The 1985 Top Ten College Women 
will be featured in Glamour's 
August College Issue. During May, 
June or July, the 10 winners wUl 
receive an all-expenses-paid trip to 



New York City and will participate 
in meetings with professionals in 
their area of interest. 

Anyone who is interested in enter- 
ing the search should contact Clar- 
ion Call. Applications are available 
in the Call office located in Harvey 
Hall or call 226-2380. The deadline 
for submitting an application to Gla- 
mour is Dec. 7, 1984. 



Halloween. They also thought that 
witches met on October 31 to wor- 
ship the devil. 

The only way, it seemed, for hu- 
mans to escape the persecution of 
the demons was to offer them food 
and sweets. Or they could escape the 
creature's fury by disguising them- 
selves as demons and join in their 
roaming. It is in this very form that 
the same custom has come down as 
our familiar Halloween celebration: 
masks of demons and witches, 
strange and unusual clothing, ghost 
figures, roaming the streets at night, 
{daying {H-anks, and finally the threat- 
ening demand of a "trick or treat." 

Traditions from many other 
cultures have also added to the Hal- 
loween customs over the centuries. 
During this time of year, ancient Ro- 
mans had a celebration in honor of 
Pomona, goddess of fruit and trees. 
Apples probably became associated 
with Halloween because of this fes- 
tival. Jack-0-Lantems, once made 
from tumi|^, are now carved out of 
pumpkins. These lanterns with a 
burning candle inside may weU be a 
combination of the demon element 
and the Halloween fire. Irish legend 
says they are named for a man 
called Jack, who could not enter 
heaven because he was a miser, and 
could not enter hell because he play- 
ed tricks on the devil. As a result. 
Jack had to walk the earth with his 



lantern until judgement day. In Eng- 
land, Halloween was often called 
Nutcrack Night or Snap Apple 
Night. Families sat by the fire and 
told stories while they ate nuts and 
apples. On All Soul's Day, poor 
people begged for food in exchange 
for promising to say prayers for the 
dead. 

Halloween traditions in America 
were brought by the Scots and Irish. 
But Halloween in the United States 
has since evolved into a time for 
costume parties, children trick-or- 
treating, pranks and practical jokes, 
and parades. Costumes are no 
longer patterned solely after de- 
mons and witches. It has become 
more a time for fun celebration, and 
not the grim ritual for the dead in 
ancient times. 

But who knows? Perhaps witches 
do fly during the night, and maybe 
ghosts of the dead do rise to roam 
the earth. One will probably note 
that there aren't many people out in 
the dark alone on Halloween night. 
Even in the midst of fun and games, 
the mystery of Halloween will 
probably always remain. 




Halloween 
Calorie Count 

Trick-or-Treating can be scary for 
your figure, according to the Hallo- 
ween Candy Calorie Count. Listed 
are some of the favorite treats given 
for Halloween. 

Miniature Calories 

Candy Treats (anmox.) 

Milky Way Snack Bar 100 

3 Musketeers Snack Bar 80 

M&M's Plain Snack Pack 110 

M&M's Peanut Snack Pack 120 

Hershey's Chocolate Bar ( .35 oz. ) 53 
Hershey's Choc. Bar w/almonds. 55 

Small Mr. Goodbar 54 

Other Treats 

Candy orange slice 61 

Black licorice stick 27 

Caramel, 1 piece 39 

Candy corn, 5 pieces 20 

Tootsie Pop 66 

Marshmallow pumpkin 20 

Small lollipop 30 



^ WELCOME ABOARD 



,1.'. 



—ANOTHER CLIPPER CLASSIC- 



>>-^<:.' *4v ?Jfe^*; m4^^£fi>)/.m'<& *(•$ :8!.j|r«-*#S ^T? 



JOB HUNTING? 

Our Computerized 

Resume Service 

will help. 

Write for 
Details and 
Price List. 

PER-SPEC 

Dept. C Box 366 
Hummelstown, PA 17036 






TREAT 



^ YOUR TUMMY 

PIZZA HUT 
PAN PIZZA 

This HALLOWEEN 



Route 2 
Shippenviile, PA 

226-5020 







Seiect a bowl of freshly made soup and a salad from our 

excitinj array of crisp greeris, vegetables, and toppings... 

complement with one of our excellent breads! 

Soup and Sf*iad Bar 2.95 

uith a Sandwich 1,50 

Soup Bar 1.50 

with a Sandwich .95 

Come in, try it and get 
one punch 

towards a free lunch 



Ask for a 
luncheon club 
card today! 



Exit 9 ■ 1-80 & Rt. 68 
226-7950 



12— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 



Rifle strictly individual sport 



By Shelly Eckenroth 



ITie Clarion University rifle team 
with its 30 participating members 
started practice on September 24. 
The number of participants almost 
doubled this year, making the 1984- 
85 team the largest in Clarion Uni- 
versity history. 

The team will consist of only 16 
members. In order to reduce the 
large group, all interested parti- 
cipants will complete their first 
firing for record this week. 

The procedure involved in the first 
firing will include shooting at three 
targets in prone position. Each tar- 
get consists of 10 recorded shots, and 
each shot is rated on a scale of to 
10, according to accuracy. The max- 
imum score possible will be 300; the 
members will be expected to score 
250 or better in order to make the 
team. 
The team's first match will be 



against Indiana University of Penn- 
sylvania on Friday, Oct. 26 at lUP. 
The traveling team will be selected 
next week by competition between 
the 16 selected team members. 

Coach Dr. Charles D. Leach ex- 
plains, "Rifle is strictly an individ- 
ual sport, in terms of performance. 
The score that each individual com- 
petitor obtains are combined into a 
team score, but there's no way one 
person can assist another person 
like in other sports." 

Dr. Leach also explains that, 
"Rifle is a pressure sport, in that 
everything that you do is recorded 
during the competition; everything 
counts. You don't have the oppor- 
tunity to redo a shot if you don't like 
a particular shot." 

Rifle also requires a great amount 
of individual discipline. The team 
does not have the support that a 
spectator sport does. In order to be a 
successful competitor, you must 



have interest, dedication, drive, and 
you must be self -generated. 

"The coach of a rifle team prob- 
ably does about as little as coach in 
any sport could do, because there's 
no way he can see through the sights 
while the participants are firing. 
You don't know what they're seeing. 
When something goes wrong, you 
don't know why it goes wrong." 
Coach Leach explains that his job is 
basically to provide administrative 
support arid to make sure the equip- 
ment is in good working order. 

The rifle team has a distinct 
difference when compared to all 
other Clarion sports in that it is the 
only co-educational intercollegiate 
sport at Clarion. Along with that dis- 
tinction comes an even more im- 
pressive fact : the rifle team finished 
last season with a 10-2 record, 
ranking them with the third best 
overall record at Clarion University. 



Haslett named PSAC Player of Week 



Clarion University's Jon Haslett, a 
6-2, 220-lb. senior, defensive end, 
was selected as the Pennsylvania 
State Athletic Conference W^tem 
Division "Player of the Week" for 
his outstanding contributions in 
Qarion's 35-24 win at Edinboro on 
Saturday. 

Haslett registered 15 tackles (7 
solo), three quarterback sacks for a 
minus 15 yards, two fumbles caused, 
an interception and return of 21 
yards (to the Edinboro 7) that set up 
a Clarion fleldgoal and a pass block 



against an attempted pass from punt 
formation to earn his "Player of the 
Week" honors. 

"Jon had just an outstanding 
game," remarked Clarion head 
coach Gene Sobolewski. "He really 
made things happen on Saturday 
and is deserving of this award." 

Haslett, who hails from Northgate 
High School in Pittsburgh and is the 
brother of Buffalo Bills linebacker 
Jim Haslett, now totals 85 tackles, 10 
qb sacks, five fumbles caused, five 
broken-up passes and two intercep- 



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tions through seven games in 1984. A 
candidate for All-America honors 
this year, Jon was named AP HM 
All-America last year by getting 99 
tackles, 17 qb sacks, four passes 
broken up, two fumble recoveries 
and one interception as the Golden 
Eagles won the PSAC Champion- 
ship. A first team choice last year on 
the ECAC AU East and PSAC-West 
teams, Jon also earned "Player of 
the Week" honors in 1983 when Qar- 
ion topped lUP to gain the West 
TiUe. 

Clarion has a 5-2 overall record in 
1984 and is 3-2 in the PSAC-Westem 
Division. The Golden Eagles have 
already assured themselves of ex- 
tending their streak of consecutive 
non-losing seasons to 24, which leads 
all NCAA Division II schools. One 
more win for Qarion will also extend 
the consecutive winning season 
streak to 21, which also leads Divi- 
sion II. 

Haslett, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira 
Haslett of 619 Parkview Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., is a secondary education 
major at Clarion. 



McFarland's/Skoal Bandits 



"Pick The Winner 



J 5 



.Arizona 

.Oklahoma 

.Southern Methodist 

.Brigham Young 

.Dartmouth 

.Mississippi 

.Notre Dame 

_Penn State 

-Navy 

.Clarion 

.Cincinnati 

..Indianapolis 

.Detroit 

.Minnesota 

_New Orleans 

_N.Y. Jets 

.Atlanta 

_Tampa Bay 

.Denver 

_San Francisco 

.Washington 



at Washington 
at Kansas 
at Texas 
at New Mexico 
at Cornell 
at Vanderbilt 
atLSU 

at W. Virginia 
at Pittsburgh 
at Cheyney 
at Houston 
at Dallas 
at Green Bay 
at Chicago 
at Cleveland 
at New England 
at Pittsburgh 
at Kansas City 
at L.A. Raiders 
at L.A. Rams 
at N.Y. Giants 
TIE BREAKER 
at San Diego 



.Seattle 

.Predict winner and final score 



CONTEST RULES 

n All entries must be received in the office of the Oarion Call on the Friday following publication 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently enrolled at Oarion University or be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimilies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant picking the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involving the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be flnal. 



NAME 



ADDRESS. 



PHONE NUMBER. 



RiemCT Center 



^i?< 





THE CLARION CALL, Clariofi, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984-13 



The picture of teamwork: The 1984 Clarion Women's Volleyball Teain. 

photo by Eric Hill 



Senior spotlight 



By Michelle Michael 



Clarion University's football 
team's co-captain, Kevin Ewing is 
helping to defend the team's PIAA 
Championship title. 

Ewing, a 6'0", 215 pound middle 
guard is a senior returning letter- 
man, who has been explosive on 
Clarion defensive line since 1981. 

An Associated Press Honorable 
Mention All-America middle guard 
in 1982 and in 1983, Ewing is consid- 
ered to be the best noseguard in 
Clarion's history. 

Ewing, who is certainly an All- 
America candidate in 1984, has had 
79 tackles, 41 of which were solo. He 
leads the defense with 10 sacks and 
three fumble recoveries (as of the 
lUPgame). 

Ewing's election to co-captain, 
along with Terry McFetridge, is well 
earned after his past three seasons 
with the Clarion team. 

Ewing led the 1983 Golden Eagles 
with 139 tackles, plus eight sacks. 
Back in 1982 he had 93 tackles and 
nine sacks. During his freshman 
year, Ewing had 88 tackles and 13 



quarterback sacks. Combining these 
statistics with this year's, Ewing's 
career total is a fantastic 399 stops, 
and 40 quarterback sacks. 

Special recognition is given to 
Ewing for these outstanding ac- 
complishments, other than his 
Associated Press Ail-American 
Honorable Mention in 1982 and in 
1983. He received ECAC Division 
All-East first team, PSAC first 
team, and Pittsburgh Press All-Dis- 
trict first team at middle guard posi- 
tion during his successful 1983 
season. 

Ewing also earned ECAC Division 
II "Player of the Week" twice in the 
1983 games against Kutztown and 
against California. Ewing was also 
on their weekly honor roll for his 
performance against Lock Haven, 
Edinboro, and Westminster in the 
1983 season. 

Ewing, a finance major, said, "I 
take each game one at a time and 
give my best each and every play 
each and every game. ' ' 

Ewing is a graduate of Penn Hills 
High School. 



•••••• 



••••••#•••##•••••• 



9 



You know He's Coining 
But have you heard 



WHO 




He is? 



HINT^l 






S TYie jubUant fan's name . Ma^^ 
: is BUCK Y and these are 11^1 



t his eyes — 

• more hints to come! 








%•••••••••••••• 



90 CABLE FM If 



Lady Spilcers victorious 
in past two matches 



By Tiki Kahle 



The Clarion women's Volleyball 
team defeated Edintwro on Tues- 
day, Oct. 16 in an evening match. 
The Lady Eagles won in three out of 
five games: 15-7, 15-8, 15-3. Edinboro 
is in the same conference as Clarion 
University, and with this win gave 
the Lady Eagles a conference record 
of 4-1, with their only loss to Slippery 
Rock. 

This past Saturday, Oct. 20, the 
Lady Eagles traveled to Mercyhurst 
to play California University and 



Mercyhurst College. Clarion opened 
against California and won 15-1, 15-9. 
Maureen Huber, Wendy Moeslein, 
and Joyce Kozusko didn't have any 
hitting errors during the match. As a 
team there were only six passing er- 
rors and two serving errors. 

Against Mercyhurst, Clarion also 
posted a victory with scores of 15-2, 
15-6. The Lady Eagles had 100 
percent serving with 44 out of 44. 
Barb Buck, Ellen Borowy and Sue 
Anderton didn't have any hitting er- 
rors and there were only eight over- 



all hitting errors in the match. Susie 
Seanor served seven aces to pull the 
Lady Eagles ahead. There were only 
two passing errors against Mercy- 
hurst. With these victories the Lady 
Eagles have an overall record of 19 
wins and nine losses. 

Clarion hosted Allegheny on Tues- 
day, Oct. 23, and then traveled to 
Edinboro University for a Division I 
and II tournament. This tournament 
will help them get ready for the 
PSAC Division Playoffs on Nov. 2 
and 3, which will also be held at 
Edinboro. 



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14— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 



Golden Eagles come back to defeat Scots 



By Mike Ko ndracki 

Pat Carbol completed 17 of 31 
passes for 282 yards and two touch- 
downs as the Golden Eagles de- 
feated the Edinboro Fighting Scots 
35-24 in a come-from-behind victory 
before a homecoming crowd at 
Edinboro. 

Bob Green was on the receiving 
end of five of those passes for a total 
of 175 yards and two of the Golden 
Eagle touchdowns. Elton Brown 
added 81 yards rushing to the Clar- 
ion cause. 

The Golden Eagle defensive unit 
was led by Jon Haslett, who regis- 
tered 15 total tackles, two quarter- 
back sacks, and one interception. 
Kevin Ewing had an outstanding 
game as well, as he registered 13 
total tackles and a fumble recovery. 
He collected his 400th career tackle 
in the first quarter of the game as 
well. Jerry Haslett and Bob Jaro- 
sinski added to the defensive play as 
th ey totaled 11 and 12 tackles re- 
spectively. 

Elric Bosley had a fine day for the 
Fighting Scots as he returned three 
Clarion kickoffs for a total of 137 
yards, including one for 98 yards. 
Bosley also chipped in one reception 
for a total of 11 yards for Edinboro. 

Big plays and turnovers char- 
acterized this game from the open- 
ing kickoff as Ray Bracy took Phil 
Bujakowski's kick and returned it 81 
yards, but fumbled it with Clarion 
recovering as he was tackled by 






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Bujakowski at the Clarion 19. 

Neither team was able to move the 
ball in the early going and both 
teams exchanged punts. Following a 
Clarion punt, the Fighting Scots took 
over on their own 25. 

Quarterback Blair Hrovat com- 
pleted a pass to the 33, and fullback 
Ray Rhodes advanced the ball to the 
Clarion 49. 

Hrovat then carried three tinies 
and moved the ball to the 26 yard 
line of Clarion. This drive stalled 
here however, and Jim Trueman's 
41-yard field goal attempt was no 
good, thus Edinboro came up empty 
on this drive. 

Once again both teams exchanged 
punts, and following the Clarion punt 
Edinboro had the ball on their own 
34-yard line. 

Running back Damon Chambers 
carried the ball to the 48 yard line for 
a gain of 14 yards. On the next play 
the Fighting Scots drew first blood 
as running back Dave Span carried 
on a 52-yard scoring run. Trueman, 
who set a school record for extra 
points in this game, added the extra 
point and Edinboro led 7-0. There 
was no further scoring in the first 
quarter. 

Clarion tied the score at 7 with 9: 17 
left in the second quarter as John 
Hughes blocked Kevin Conlan's punt 
into the endzone, and Ewing fell on 
top of the ball for the Clarion touch- 
down. Fairbanks added his first of 
three extra points of the afternoon. 

Edinboro took over on their own 20 
following the kickoff, and on the 
second play Hrovat's pass was 
intercepted by Jon Haslett and re- 
turned to the Edinboro seven-yard 
line. Clarion advanced the ball to the 
two yard line on two running plays, 
but the drive stalled there and Fair- 
banks was called upon for a 20-yard 
field goal Fairbanks' kick was good 
and the Golden Eagles took the lead 
10-7. 

Edinboro wasted no time in re- 
gaining the lead as Bujakowski's 
kickoff was returned 98 yards for a 
touchdown by Eric Bosley. The re- 



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The Golden Eagle offense pokes another hole in the Scots' line to let this Clarion runner through. Clarion deledted 
Edinboro 35-24 on Saturday. photo by Mike Kondracki 



turn by Bosley tied the Edinboro 
school record for the second longest 
kickoff return in history. Bosley also 
holds the school record for longest 
kickoff return which was 100 yards. 
Trueman added the extra point and 
Edinboro led 14-10 with 6:58 left to 
play in the first half. 

On the next two series both teams 
exchanged punts. Following the 
Edinboro punt Clarion took over on 
their own 10-yard-line. 

Carbol completed a pass to Green 
to the 35, and Carbol carried on the 
next play to the Edinboro 47 yard 
line. Ray Sanchez carried to the 45, 
but Carbol was sacked on the next 
play by John Brenneman for a loss 
of five yards. Carbol was then sack- 
ed again on the next play by Rick 
Jordan and the Golden Eagles were 
forced to punt. Bujakowski's punt 
was blocked by Sean Henderson, and 
Don Espy recovered and returned 
the ball 39 yards for an Edinboro 
touchdown. Trueman added the 
extra point and the Fighting Scots 



led 21-10 with 1:31 left to play in the 
first half. 

Clarion added a field goal just be- 
fore halftime after a carefully ex- 
ecuted drive. Clarion began on their 
own eight yard line after the kickoff. 
Brown advanced the ball to the 23 on 
two consecutive carries. Carbol then 
completed two passes, one to Green 
for 25 yards, and one to Ickes for a 
gain of 26 yards, and advanced the 
baU to the Edinboro 26 yard line. 
From there Carbol completed anoth- 
er pass to Ickes for a gain of seven 
yards, and Fairbanks added the 31- 
yard field goal just as time expired 
in the half. 

Clarion received the sec(Hid kick- 
off, but Carbol's first passing at- 
tempt was intercepted by Martelle 
Betters and returned to the Qarion 
four-yard line. The Qarion defense 
stiffened here and Jim Trueman was 
called upon for a 19-yard field goal, 
vtiiich gave Edinboro a 24-13 lead. 

Clarion moved to within three 
points of the Fighting Scots with 8 : 38 



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left in the third quarter. Ewing re- 
covered a Hrovat fumble at the 
Edinboro 23-yard-line, and one play 
later the Golden Eagles scored. 
Carbol completed a 23-yard 
touchdown pass to Green, and the 
two-point conversion pass to Brown 
and the Golden Eagles now trailed 
24-21. There was no further scoring 
in the third quarter, and Clarion 
trailed going into the final 15 
minutes. 

The fourth quarter was all 
Qarion, however, and the Golden 
Eagles struck first with 9:23 left in 
the game. 

The Golden Eagles took over on 
their own 20-yard line following an 
Edinboro punt. Carbol completed a 
pass to Ickes to the 28, but Carbol 
was sacked on the next play. Qarion 
was also guilty of holding on that 
same play. The sack and the penalty 
moved the ball back to the Qarion 
18. Brown earned on the next two 
plays for a gain of 11 and a gain of 
three yards. Carbol then completed 
a pass to Brown good for 10 yards to 
the 32. Carbol then found Brown on 
the next two plays on passes of five 
and four yards to the Edinboro 49. 
ITie Golden Eagles were forced to 
punt, however, and Bujakowski's 
punt went out of bounds at the Edin- 
boro 20-yard-line. 

Edinboro advanced the ball to the 
32-yard-line on a carry by Rhodes. 
Th is is as far as Edinboro would get 
on this possession as Rhodes fum- 
bled on his next carry and Jerry 
Haslett recovered at the Edinboro 
36. 

Brown carried to the 34, and 
Carbol completed a pass to Green 
good for 30 yards to the four-yard 
line. From there it took John Mar- 
shall two carries to cross the goal 
line with the go-ahead touchdown. 
Fairbanks added the extra point and 
the Golden Eagles led for good 28-24. 

Qarion took over on their own 31- 
yard-line after Kevin Conlan's punt 
was downed there. Carbol then com- 
pleted a 69-yard touchdown pass to 
Green, and Fairbanks added the 
extra point to round out the Qarion 
scoring. 

The Golden Eagles will play their 
final away game of the season this 
week against Cheyney. Game time 
is scheduled f or 1 : 30 p.m . 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984-15 



Athlete of the week 



By Dina Gruey 



Eagle QuarteriMck Pat Carbol passes for 282 yards against Edinboro to lead Clarion to a 35-24 victory. 

photo by Mike Kondracki 

Clarion takes one in quad-meet 



By David Pound 



The Men's Cross Country team 
traveled to Mansfield Saturday, 
where Mansfield, Bloomsburg, 
Slippery Rock, and Qarion compet- 
ed. The Golden Eagles defeated 
Bloomsburg 17-41, but lost to Slip- 
pery Rock 19-44, and Mansfield 22- 
34. 

Jim Snyder finished first for 
Qarion and fourth overall in the 4.8 
mile course with a time of 25:18. 
Greg Garstecki fmished second for 
Qarion and 12th overaU at 26:17. 
Bob Smith finished 14th overall and 
third for Qarion with a 26:25 time. 
Following Smith was Pelligrino Cic- 



carello with 26:35 and Jay Rogers 
with 27:25. 

Qarion ran the race without three 
of their top five runners. Scott 
DeLaney did not compete due to a 
viral infection. Doug McConnell 
started the race but had to drop out 
because of illness. Senior Bob Smith 
ran the course, but his performance 
was hampered by a sprained ankle 
and a possible stress fracture. Coach 
Bill English expects all three 
runners back for competition this 
week. 

Despite the Golden Eagles two 
losses at Mansfield, Coach English 
praised the team for their fine effort. 
He stated that Jim Snyder ran the 



race of his life and is getting strong- 
er and stronger every week. He also 
emiriiasized that Greg Garstecki has 
been running consistently all year 
long. . 

This Saturday Qarion travels to 
Slippery Rock University to com- 
pete for the State Championship. 

Sports 
Tip 

2380 



Louisville, Ohio. Most of us have 
never even heard of this small city 
before, yet the football record books 
at the local high school there are 
filled with a familiar name to Golden 
Eagle fans. To be exact, this ver- 
satile athlete holds six records at 
Louisville High, including top honors 
in most completions and most 
yardage in a single season. Here at 
Qarion, Junior Pat Carbol has not 
only been the starting quarterback 
since his freshman year, but has 
also racked up over 3500 yards to 
date, placing him just 900 yards shy 
of the university's record. In addi- 
tion, he is only 11 touchdowns away 
from another first-place honor. 

One of five Carbol sons involved in 
football, Pat is in the midst of turn- 
ing in his third fine season for the 
Golden Eagles. As with any quarter- 
back, he has had to deal with the 
pressures placed on him by the fans 
during his 10 years of playing the 
game. Pat, however, is not bothered 
by these expectations to perform, 
and remains optimistic regardless 
of a game's outcome. He reflects 
that he has always enjoyed being 
involved in the sport but has never 
allowed football to dominate his life. 
"If I didn't like playing, I would 
have quit a long time ago because 
I'm not concerned with gaining any 
recognition or prestige. I just go out 
on the field and have a good time," 
Carbol stated. Pat's more concerned 
with making the best of the '84 sea- 
son, hoping to guide the Golden 
Eagles to a respectable 8-2 record. 
He remarked that to accomplish 
this, it will have to be a team effort. 
"Generally if the offensive line has a 
good game, I'll have a good game. 
The same goes for the receivers. All 
of us have to work together if we 
want to win." 



After completing his final season 
at Qarion next year, Pat plans to 
enjoy all the activities that he's 
missed because of his athletic com- 
mitment. He's looking forward to 
watching the CUP football games 
and calling the shots from an "arm 
chair" quarterback's point of view. 
Pat's assessment of any future 
career in the NFL or USFL is 
modest. "I don't think I'm good 
enough to be a pro, but if I had the 
chance, I'd be foolish to pass it up 
because if I did I'd always wonder 
what it would have been like to play 
in the pros." In the meantime, Pat is 
a business major specializing in In- 
dustrial Relations. 

With another 10 games slated for 
the '85 season, the Golden Eagle 
Football Team promises to once 
again give its fans something to 
cheer about. In the spirit of this 
winning tradition, the name "Pat 
Carbol" will surely be added to the 
record books of Clarion University, 
setting an example for future aspir- 
ing quarterbacks. 






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16— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 25, 1984 



DAVID R.WRIGHT 

Representative in the General Assembly 

He makes a difference! 




The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 



ttaxiM/ UiiUwiA% 4 PwM^hxiMaj 



Grief over summer school continues; 
contingency courses make it a strugle 



By Stan Eakin 



Attending summer sessions at 
Clarion University can be a frus- 
trating experience. Long hours, last 
second changes and cancelled 
classes are possibilities that the stu- 
dents and faculty have to face. 

It's a terrible occurrence when a 
student has paid for summer hous- 
ing and has planned his valuable 
vacation around summer classes 
and then has them cancelled. 

There are true "horror" stories 
where students have been literally 
stranded in Clarion, unable to get 
their rent money back and stuck 
here without a job or classes. 

The problem also exists with the 
faculty. They too are victimized 
when a course is eliminated. 

If the class is dropped the faculty 
member receives no payment. 

The main source of grief seems to 
stem from classes called "contin- 
gency courses". These courses are 
not guaranteed and depend upon a 
set enrollment. That enrollment is 
based on attendance of the first day 
of class. 

Dismissing a course on the first 
meeting may seem too quick, but 
there is a good reason for it. It allows 
students to find another course and 
join it before getting too far behind. 



Remember, a week in summer 
school is equal to about three weeks 
in regular sessions. Thp <»arly with- 
drawal also saves the instructor 
time. When registered for a summer 
class, make sure on attendance. The 
first day is the deciding factor on 
whether the course is held or cut. 

Then why have unguaranteed 
classes at all? Contingency courses, 
as much as no one likes them, are 
inevitable. Some courses simply 
don't create enough demand to guar- 
antee them. 

To hold a class with only a few 
stud«its is financially impractical. 
That is why the school adminis- 
tration has placed a set minimum 
limit of enrollment on these courses. 

The set number as of last year is 12 
students. Any less and the course 
conceivably cannot pay for itself. 

It's not that the administration's 
goal is to make money. Their goal is 
to educate students and not lose too 
much money, whereas they might 
have to eliminate our vast summer 
program altogether. Even with the 
general understanding of contin- 
gency courses there are problems. 

Dr. Helen Lemke, Dean of 
Qarion's summer school program, 
has some good ideas and hopes to 
help lower the number of cancelled 
classes drastically. Dr. Lemke is 



rather new to the Clarion summer 
program, being appointed only late 
last spring. She credits the efforts of 
the faculty to improve the program 
by doing research on our summer 
school in a close examination of 
where the problems lie in 1982. 

The review was led by chairman 
Dr. Franklin Takei, and many ans- 
wers were drawn up from the 
review. With the combined ideas and 
efforts of Clarion's faculty and 
administration, they have made sch- 
edules for summer sessions 
available much earlier. The sched- 
ules were given to all advisors and 
resident directors before spring reg- 
istration. This step tremendously 
helps the student in allowing them to 
see what is being offered in the 
summer before making decisions on 
what spring courses to take. The 
schedule has never been available 
this early before. 

In order to minimize the number 
of contingency courses, Dr. Lemke, 
combining the ideas from the facul- 
ties report with her own, has aver- 
aged the classes in most demand 
over the past five years and made 
certain that these courses are 
guaranteed. She followed this by 
trimming back the courses that have 
been in least demand, thus lowering 
see School. . .page 2 



Historic Orpheum Theatre reopened; 
variety of films promised 



A Clarion tradition resumed Fri- 
day night, as Venango Management 
reopened the Orepeum Theater that 
was damaged by fire in May 1983. 

Venango Management owns both 
the Orpheum, on Main Street near 
the corner of Fifth Avenue, and the 
Garby Theater, also on Main across 
the street from the post office. 

Company President, Chester De- 
Marsh, says the resumption of 
movies at the Orpheum, this time as 
a twin theater, will increase the 
variety of films offered to the public 
as well as the number of showings. 

"We've had to pull a product early 
in the past because there are so 



many other movies people wanted to 
see. Everybody releases pictures in 
bunches today, so you have to show 
the produce when it's available." 

DeMarsh said the fire was caused 
by faulty wiring, which has been 
completely replaced. The walls have 
been redraped, work has been done 
on the ceiling, the carpet has been 
replaced, the seats are 
reconditioned and two separate 
projection booths and sound systems 
have been added. 

"We just took our time to get it 
done because we wanted to do it 
right," he said. "All that is left of the 
original theater is the shell." 




NOT ANY MORE - the Orpheum Theatre marquee now advertises two popular 
movies since its re-openIng last week. Clarion Call file photo 



According to Vivian Aaron, man- 
ager of both Clarion theaters, the 
first auditorium in the Orpheum 
seats 112 customers and auditorium 
two seats 120 people. 

She recounted the long history of 
the Orpheum, beginning in 1912, 
when school teacher Lewis Hep- 
pinger started the theater in the old 
Cherico building on the corner of 
Wood and Sixth Avenue. 

Later, the theater was moved to 
the Haskell building across the 
street from its present location, 
where it has been since the 1930s. 

After Heppinger's death in 1950, 
the Orpheum continued in operation 
for 10 years under the management 
of Vivian and Louis Aaron. It was 
held in trusteeship by William Flan- 
agan. 

In 1960 the Aarons bought the 
Orpheum and operated it until 1966, 
when it was purchased by Venango 
Management, Inc. The Garby was 
bought by Venango at about the 
same time. 

Although a Pittsburgh corporation 
leased and operated the theaters for 
a time, Venango has retained owner- 
ship. 

Aaron, who has worked in the 
movie theater business since she 
was a teenager, said she has seen 
lots of changes, but the work is en- 
joyable. 

"It's really something. Once you 
get it in your blood it's hard to get 
away from." 

(Reprinted with permission from 
The Clarion News.) 




Becht Hall is prepared to undergo some minor repairs. 



photo by Dan Roberts 



Harrisburg funds dorm repairs 



By Nancy Umbaugh 



Becht Hall is now undergoing 
minor repairs by the Penn Roofing 
Company of Pittsburgh. 

According to Mr. Donald Elder, 
Sr., the Institutional Maintenance 
Superintendent, the minor repairs 
consist of: gutter and roof tile re- 
placement, chimney restoration, 
and trim painting on the gutters. 

The reason for the gutter repairs 



is because water was leading 
through the outside brick and 
wetting the walls in the rooms. The 
other repairs were essential due to 
deterioration over time. 

The construction, which began on 
October 15, is expected to last until 
the end of October. 

Present construction on Becht 
Hall is costing $24,270. Funding 
came from the Dormitory Repair 
Fund in Harrisburg. 



Bonds set card contest 



President and Mrs. Thomas Bond 
are once again sponsoring a contest 
for the design of their official holi- 
day greeting card. 

In 1982 the winning design by Don 
Reed featured the steel sculpture on 
Ralston Hill; in 1983 the winning 
design by Laura Harpst depicted 
Music Hall. 

Rules : 

1. The design must be in black and 
white, approximately 4" x 5". Only 



the front of the card needs to be in- 
cluded; the greeting and the explan- 
ation will be added later. 

2. The contest is open to any Clar- 
ion University student. 

3. All entries must be submitted by 
Nov. 5, 1984. Submit entries to Judy. 
Bond at the Sandford Gallery, Mar- 
wick-Boyd Fine Arts. 

The winner will be awarded a 
$15.00 prize and will have his/her de- 
sign printed on the greeting cards to 
be used by President and Mrs. Bond. 



ON THE INSIDE 

Editorial 2 Chandler Menu 7 



Hide Park 2 

Letters 3 

National College News 4 

Student Senate 6 



Introducing 8 

BU prof visits U.S.S.R 10 

Pick the Winners 12 

Football 15 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 




It's that time of year again. It's almost like a holiday. Your palms get 
sweaty, stomach and head aches are frequent, sleepless nights follow 
anxious days, and when all is said and done, excitement is replaced by 
exhaustion. Which holiday is this I speak of? Why, scheduling, of course. 

And like a holiday season, the course of events and people's atti- 
tudes are as predictable as Santa and Rudolph. 

Business, as well as other majors, have to line up (before the 
computer is prepared) in order to have even a 50-50 chance of getting 
the necessary classes because there is a great demand for a class or 
classes and never enough sections to accommodate the number of stu- 
ctents. This phenomena is worse than the rush on Cabbage Patch Dolls. 

The plight of the sophomore can be as predictable as the Great 
Pumpkin never appearing to Linus in the pumpkin patch. This well-inten- 
tioned variety of student wants classes in his major. He is tired of taking 
those courses that make for "a well rounded education." But it is this 
very student who learns that dirtiest of dirty words - closed. No student 
wants to spend an estimated $2000 for tuition, books and housing for a 
semester that is essentially just for biding time until the necessary 
courses are available. 

The physical symptoms become acute when a student is gripped 
with the fear of not getting the classes, particular professor and/or hour 
to make a decent semester of work. Another fear is about what's being 
missed in the classes the student is skipping to stand in line or to meet 
with an advisor. 

And then the fun begins. You finally get someone's attention, your 
social security number is punched into the computer, you begin to 
believe in the Easter Bunny, and - the computer yelps, "hold the phone, 
this cat has an unpaid bill, looks like a health center fee." And thus, the 
student's vocabulary is exercised with a few more dirty words. . . 

So it is the chain of events, grouped with hurried and rude secre- 
taries, confused computer assistants, uncooperative, unavailable deans 
and advisors that make for all this holiday fun. 

Could it be any other way? 

Karen E. Hale 
Editor-in-Chief 



(^The Clarion Call 

\J/ Room 1 Harvey Hall 



Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



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The Clarion Call Is published every Thursday during the school year in 
accordance with the school calendar. Editors accept contributions to their 
columns from any source, but reserve the right to edit all copy. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not 
necessarily the opinions of the university or of the student body. 

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HIDE Pft 

Politics -1984 




Both Mr. Reagan and Mr. 
Mondale hope to cull a reputation for 
"statesmanship" from the hurly- 
burly of the electoral campaign. To 
do this, each accuses the other of 
playing politics, which is "bad." 
Each attempts to create the impres- 
sion that he is somehow above pol- 
itics, which is "good." If we are un- 
critically to accept what each can- 
didate says of himself and his 
opposition, then we the public face a 
campaign in which each of two rival 
statesmen tries to exalt himself by 
describing the other as "political." 
Each sees Himself as a statesman 
acting to preserve our precious heri- 
tage of liberty and freedom. Each 
says the other, by playing politics, 
will jeopardize this precious heri- 
tage. 

Among the elements of our heri- 
tage of liberty and freedom is the 
belief that judges and courts are in- 
dependent of outside pressures when 
they decide cases, and that, under 
the common law, they have estab- 
lished precedents which protect 
ordinary people from arbitrary and 
capricious abuse. These grand 
beliefs are both, no doubt, sustained 
by the "statesmen" Reagan and 
Mondale. Let us reflect on the origin 
of these t)eliefs. 

In 1066, the Norman conquest of 
England was militarily completed, 
and England's conquerors faced a 
political problem. How could they, 
an alien minority, successfully im- 



pose their rule on a resentful popu- 
lation? They tried. One of their solu- 
tions to this political problem was to 
impose uniform law, emanating 
from the king, over all of England. 
This imposition became over time 
the body of rules and procedures col- 
lectively known as common law. The 
motive that impelled the establish- 
ment of the common law was the 
desire of English monarchs to suc- 
cessfully establish and maintain 
their authority over all of England. 
It was, in short, a political solution to 
a political problem. 

Many centuries later, the Found- 
ing Fathers kept English common 
law when the United States separat- 
ed from the mother country. But 
while the Americans were united in 
their desire to overthrow British 
authority (they drove out those who 
were loyal to England), they agreed 
on little else. Partisan rivalries were 
keen and bitter in the new republic. 
With the election of Jefferson in 1800 
and with Congress controlled by his 
supporters, the Federalists, who 
were anti-Jeffersonian, feared the 
worst. One Federalist was John 
Marshall, the Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court. He was determined 
to maintain Federalist influence, or, 
in other words, he was a convinced 
political partisan who regarded the 
Jeffersonians as rivals to be crushed. 
When opportunity came his way, he 
struck. In the famous case of Mar- 
bury v. Madison, he invoked the 



principles of common law to estab- 
lish the power of the Supreme Court 
to declare laws of Congress null and 
void when, in the Court's opinion, 
such laws contradicted the Constitu- 
tion. Since Marshall's Court had a 
Federalist majority, the Jefferson- 
ians, he hoped, would be kept in 
check. In short, Marshall was 
moved to act as he did by political 
considerations in a very bitter politi- 
cal rivalry. 

Today, the early kings of England 
are universally praised for their 
"statesmanlike" efforts, which es- 
tablished the common law. Today, 
Marshall is regarded as a great ju- 
dicial "statesman" because he is the 
author of the doctrine of judicial re- 
view. Their efforts, now regarded 
great statecraft, were, at the time 
they were done, regarded, and re- 
sented, as political maneuvers. A 
statesman, it seems, is someone who 
has been dead a long time, whose 
political efforts have, by hindsight, 
commanded admiration. 

Perhaps the Messrs. Reagan and 
Mondale should reveal themselves 
as the politicians they are and real- 
ize the difficulties that beset Amer- 
ican society can only be solved by 
politicians acting in political ways. 
In the long run, they may come to be 
regarded as statesmen, but, as 
Keynes remarked, in the long run we 
are all dead. Now, they, we hope, 
and we, are very much alive. 

Emmett Graybill 



SUiniTIGr school. > ■ (continued from Page 1) 



the number of contingency courses 
offered. 

This last step was an arduous one, 
but she feels that all fields are 
closely represented, producing a 
well-rounded summer school pro- 
gram. 

This summer's schedule offers 70 



percent of contracted, guaranteed 
courses. So between the early 
release of the summer schedule and 
the trimming of contingency 
courses, the number of summer mis- 
haps should decline. 

Summer school is a very popular 
program here, 2,556 students regis- 



tered for summer classes last year. 
That is half of our entire fall/spring 
enrollment. 

This program is just too important 
to ever chance losing. That is why 
contingency courses are in- 
escapable. Whether you're pushing 
ahead or catching up, the opportun- 
ity is there. 




tUtrnHKOrUl^HJ^tOU^IfUl! Tt&ltneH^TMiT&HlK&S.Trie 



t£F\at m^^ecnoHs, m im^ ?ms&,vfi^m^ v \uFUcnou! 



V 



##*# 




By Michael J. Downing 



Election Day is November 6, 1984. 
Registered student voters can cast 
their ballots in the lobby of Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. 

But before we decide the answer to 
the vital question of the presidency, 
let us examine one major point: Are 
we better off now (in 1984) than we 
were after four years of Democratic 
leadership (in 1980)? 

Maybe this is too general of a 
question, so let us examine some 
specifics. 

After the Carter-Mondale admin- 
istration left office, U.S. economic 
growth had become stagnant, in- 
flation was skyrocketing, and the 
prime interest rate was so high that 
many home-buyers could not afford 
a loan. The "Misery Index" (which 
illustrated the economic state of the 
union) was at 19.5 during 1980. Dur- 
ing July of 1984 that same index had 
receded to a remarkable 11.7. 

Inflation during the Carter-Mon- 
dale administration climbed from 
4.8 percent in 1975 to 12.4 percent in 
1980. After the Republicans took 
over, the rale steadily declined until 
it leveled off at 7 percent. 

Federal spending went from 17.4 
percent in 1980 to 7 percent in 1984. 
This is mostly due to cuts that Rea- 
gan made in the federal work force. 
He trimmed the work force of un- 
necessary jobs there by reducing 
federal expenditures and saving the 
country millions of dollars. 



Also, the growth of our own armed 
services has put money to where it is 
well spent. When Reagan built up 
our defense, he put thousands of high 
school graduates into well-paying, 
character-building careers. The 
money that the government is now 
spending is reaping its benefits in 
the form of a stronger nation. Young 
men and women now have pride, a 
future, and money in their pockets. 
Our armed services have turned out 
to be a vital employer in today's job- 
slow economy. 

One plan that Walter Mondale 
plans to keep is one that scares me to 
death: He plans to raise our taxes. 
This tax increase has been 
estimated at an average of $1,500 per 
year, per household. There is no way 
that we can afford to fund an inef- 
ficient, money-wasting government. 

I believe that we are better off 
having the money in our own pockets 
to spend as we see fit instead of 
having our money funnelled into 
one, predestined area. Our system of 
free enterprise will be choked off if 
the goverrmient makes the choices 
as to how, when, and where we 
spend our money. As Reagan sees it, 
we must first have the money to 
spend, and then spend it as we see 
fit. Only then will our country thrive 
economically. 

So, are we better off than we were 
four years ago? You be the judge 
and let the world know the strength 
of the United States on Tuesday, 
Nov. 6. 



Sagan takes stand on 'Star Wars' 
at lUP press conference 



(Reprinted with permission from 
the Indiana University Penn.) 

By Rob Boston 

Penn Editor 

Development of "Star Wars" tech- 
nology violates arms agreements 
between the United States and the 
Soviet Union and increases the pos- 
sibility of nuclear war, noted astron- 
omer Carl Sagan said recently. 

At a press conference in Gorell 
Hall on the campus of lUP, Sagan 
said, "there is no conceivable pur- 
pose for those weapons." The 
system, known as X-ray laser and 
popularly called "Star Wars," pro- 
vides for satellites in the atmo- 
sphere which shoot down and de- 
stroy incoming nuclear missiles. 
The system is favored by President 
Reagan. 

Sagan said the system would 
"move warfare into a major new 
area," encouraging the Soviets to 
develop similar systems. 

"Almost everyone agrees it won't 
work," Sagan continued. "It is a 
delusion." 

According to Sagan, such a system 
only increases the likelihood of nuc- 
lear war since it encourages the So- 
viets to launch a pre-emptive strike 
before the system is activated. He 
also said the system will never be 
able to shoot down all incoming mis- 
siles, thus encouraging the Soviets to 
launch more. He also contended that 
the system is "ruinously expen- 
sive," with a price tag of one trillion 
dollars. 

Sagan said the weapons would also 
"breech at least three treaties that 
the United States has solemnly 
entered into. For that reason alone, 
it is extremely unreliable." 



Sagan characterized Reagan as 
"simply not interested in arms con- 
trol and ill-formed on the issues." 

According to Sagan, Reagan does 
not know "the basic facts" concern- 
ing nuclear weapons. He cited two 
examples, one in which the presi- 
dent expressed his surprise at 
learning that once a nuclear missile 
is launched it cannot be recalled, 
and another in which the president 
said he was not aware that the 
majority of the Soviet nuclear 
defense is land-based as opposed to 
that of the United States, which is 
submarine based. 

Sagan also said that when Reagan 
discusses nuclear war, "he reaches 
for the book of Revelations." He said 
Reagan may believe nuclear war to 
be inevitable to fulfill Biblical 
prophesies. 

According to Sagan, the number of 
nuclear weapons in the world today 
is "excessive." Sagan said there are 
now 50,000 nuclear weapons in the 
world, and the number is increasing. 

"It is clear that the U.S. has more 
than enough strategic weapons," he 
said. "One prescription I would give 
to both nations is to cool it." 

Sagan said one way to encourage 
arms reduction is for the United 
States to stop threatening the Sov- 
iets. He pointed out that since the de- 
velopment of the atomic bomb the 
United States has been first with 
most new developments while the 
Soviets came "huffing and puffing" 
behind. 

"My sense is that any one of the 
three Democratic candidates was 
light years ahead of Reagan on any 
issue that counts," Sagan said. "I 
certainly intend to vote for Mr. Mon- 
dale, although he's not perfect." 



Student speaks 
against Reagan 

The United States has experienced 
a phenomenon under the Reagan 
administration - an ideological gov- 
ernment. According to ultra-conser- 
vative Reaganites, the Federal De- 
partment of Education should be 
abolished; however, Reagan backed 
away from this crazy idea when stu- 
dents, the United States Student 
Association, as well as many other 
groups, such as, the National Edu- 
cation Association, fought with Con- 
gressional Democrats and Republi- 
cans to defeat the Reagan agenda 
for ignorance. Many Republicans 
who oppose "big government" be- 
lieve federal aid to education is a 
necessary government role. They 
well know that countless constitu- 
ents and taxpayers owe their educa- 
tional opportunities to the federal 
government. 

Approximately 80 percent of 
Clarion students receive some sort 
of federal education aid. Supplemen- 
tal Opportunity Grants (SEOG), 
college work study (CWS), pell 
grants. National Direct Student 
Loans (NDSL), Guaranteed Student 
Loans (GSL), and plus loans all 
were scheduled for extinction under 
the Reagan administration. 

In this election year, as we hear 
President Reagan attempt to "cor- 
ner the market" on Patriotism by 
speaking of the "gold medal future" 
of America, we should ask ourselves 
some questions. Does our future lie 
in the jungles of El Salvador? Does 
Reagan care about federal aid to 
education? We should note that the 
President doubled the amount of 
money for President Carter's not so 
rapid "Rapid Deployment Force" 
and built wider airfields and heli- 
copter bases in Honduras. He ac- 
cepted the responsibility for the 
deaths of our young Marines in 
Lebanon, blaming congressional 
Democrats a week later. The Pres- 
ident vowed not to surrender as our 
Marines attempted to defend them- 
selves in indefensible positions. The 
President practically doubled the 
Defense budget from 1979's $196 bil- 
hon to $300 billion in 1984. Contrary 
to the thoughts of many, the largest 
increases were in weapons procure- 
ment, not readiness or military pay. 

We might ask ourselves why Rea- 
gan plans to spend $450 billion on 
new nuclear weapons over the next 
four years, as 75 percent of Ameri- 
cans demand an end to this madness 
and call for a bilateral, verifiable, 
nuclear weapons freeze on the de- 
ployment, production and testing of 
nuclear weapons and delivery sys- 
tems. Why does our leader spend 
more money on bombs as our in- 
dustrial base rots, our small farm- 
ers suffer, and 16 percent of Amer- 
icans suffer the misery of poverty? 
Why, Mr. President, do you produce 
nerve gas as America explains to 
70,000 women and children in New 
York City alone, that we must deny 
them food stamps? Why does our 
President state on "Good Morning 
America" that most of our street 
people, who sleep on city heating 
grates in the winter, are there by 
choice - when "Scientific American" 
provides evidence that most of these 
people are mentally ill? 

If I could, I would ask the Presi- 
dent about his priorities in these 
matters, the question is, will the 
American people accept this man's 
characterization of America as a 
country entering its "springtime", 
or will reagan's true policies be ex- 
posed as his "nuclear winter." 
Mark Calafati 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984-3 




Conservatives a(d(dress 
political races 



Dear Editor, 

We noted Michael Downing's sup- 
plication in his "Campaign '84" col- 
umn, for a more politically involved 
student tjody. So here it goes Mike. 

We the Clarion University College 
Republicans, do not advocate heck- 
Ung aimed at Walter Mondale, or 
any other candidate. After your ar- 
ticle in last week's Call, implying the 
Ck)llege Republican movement ad- 
vocated heckling, we felt we should 
set the record straight. Let Mr. Mon- 
dale talk, unhindered. We believe 
that the more Mr. Mondale dis- 
cusses his "issues", the more the 
voters will scramble to support 
President Ronald Reagan. 

But enough of Presidential poli- 
tics. We would now like to address 
our congressional race. Our con- 
gressman. Bill Clinger, is running 
for his fourth consecutive term in 
congress. He has a proven track 
record consisting of legislation that 
passed which is beneficial to the na- 
tion as well as the congressional dis- 
trict. He has done this despite the 
fact that he is a Republican in a 
Democratically controlled house. 
(PA. Wilderness Act of 1984, Capital 
Budget Bill, etc.) 

Mr. Wachob has been known to 
criticize Congressman Clinger for 
not subjecting himself to 12 debates 
throughout the 23rd congressional 
district. We hope Mr. Wachob could 
clarify the issues in less than 12 de- 



bates. Congressman Clinger wanted 
to clarify the issues in two debates, 
one of which was to take place on 
this campus. However, when a day 
and time was tentatively agreed on, 
Mr. Wachob strangely encountered 
scheduling problems. 

Mr. Wachob claims he likes to talk 
about the issues. What about the is- 
sue of child molestation? As a state 
representative, Mr. Wachob voted 
against a bill requiring a three-year 
mandatory sentencing for child 
molesters! 

What about law and order? Ask 
Mr. Wachob why he voted against 
the anti-intruder bill (House Bill 
401), guilty but mentally ill verdicts 
(S.B. 171), mandatory sentencing 
(H.B. 1804). 

We would like to thank the editor- 
in-chief, Karen Hale, for printing 
this letter, and doing a much better 
job in The Call, of giving equal con- 
sideration to a more conservative 
point of view. 

Remember November 6, and help 
to continue the fight to bring Amer- 
ica back, standing proud once 
again! 

Sincerely, 

Juris Keliey 

President, Clarion University 

College Republicans 

Jeff Hodgson 
Chairman, Committee on 
Personal Liberty 



** 



Showdown '84 



** 



With record numbers of students registering to vote 
across the country, students will have an unprecedented 
opportunity to shape our nation's course on such issues 
as arms control, foreign policy, the economy, and others on 
November 6th, Election Day. 

As a service to student voters, the National Student Cam- 
paign for Voter Registration offers this guide to the positions 
of the Democratic and Republican candidates for President, 
Walter Mondale and Ronald Reagan. 





ARMS CONTROL 



Nuclear freeze. 
"Sur Wars" 
programa 
MX missile. 
Bl bomber. 
Increase in de- 
fense spending. 



MONDALE 




YES 

NO 


NO 
YES 


NO 
NO 

3-4% 


YES 
YES 

7.5% 



CENTRAL AMERICA 



MOWPAIE 



U.S. Aid 

to Nicaraguan 

rebels. 

U.S. Aid to 

El Salvador. 

"Contadora 

process" for 

negotiated 

settlement. 

U.S. military 

In Central 

America. 

Mining of 

Nicaraguan 

harbors. 



NO 



Tie to human 

rights. 

YES 



Remove all 
foreign forces. 

NO 



MAQAN 



YF.S 

YES 
Wavering. 



YES In 
Honduras. 



THE ECONOMY 



MONDALE 



How to cut 
federal deficits. 



Balanced 
Budget 
Amendment. 
Jobs for youth. 



Tax reform. 

cut miliury 
spending 
increases 



NO 



liirgetted 

training 

programs. 



YES 



REAttAM 



Strong 

economic 

recovery for 

increased 

revenue, cut 

spending. 

YES 



Supports 

submlnimum 

n-agc. 



CIVIL RIGHTS 



Equal Rights 
Amendment. 
Equal pay for 
work of com- 
parable worth. 
Constitutional 
amendment to 
prohibit abortion. 
Affirmative 
action. 



Voting Rights 
Act of 1981. 

Busing to inte- 
grate schools. 

THE ENVIRONMENT 



Pollution con- 
trols to reduce 
acid rain. 
Increase fund- 
ing for hazard- 
ous waste Superfund. 
Compensate 
toxic exposure 
victims. 
Tix hazardous 
waste generators. 

HIGHER EDUCATION 



Federal stu- 
dent loans, 
grants, other aid. 
Abolish 
Department of 
Education . 



MONDAIF 


REAGAN 


YES 


NO 


YES 


NO 


NO 


YES 


Calls for 
•verifiable 


Opposes 
quotas. 


measure- 




ments." 




Supported. 


Signed after 
tnitUI 


YES 


opposition. 
NO 



MONDALE 


REAGAN 


YES 


NO 


YES 


No position 


d. 

YES 


No position 


YES 


No position 



MONDALE 


REAGAN 


Will 


Cut in 1981. 


strengthen. 




NO 


YES 



Sources: Congressional Quarterly, 1984 Democratic National Platform. 1984 
Republican National Platform, The Washington Post. 

National Student Campaign for Vc>ter Registration 
S? Temple Place. Boston, M.* 02 1 11 (617) 35"' 90 16 



4-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA Thursday, Nov. 1 , 1984 



Students across the nation seem 
to be swinging toward Reagan 



By Jonathan Burton 



Outside the Student Union at Cal- 
ifornia State University at North- 
ridge, Katrina Parker, a 22-year-old 
student, hands out aids for a speed 
reading course. She wears an aqua 
and pink spattered t-shirt, part of 
her own line of sportswear, which 
she also sells. She hopes to start an 
office cleaning service soon. 

All those enterprises, however, 
meet only part of her tuition expen- 
ses. For the remainder, Parker, who 
comes from a black. Democratic 
middle-class background, relies on 
federal student aid. 

And this prototypical Walter 
Mondale supporter plans to vote for 
Ronald Reagan. 

"There's no way I could vote for 
Mondale," Parker says. "He's like a 
little wimp to me." 

The president, on the other hand, 
is "of good character," a "strong 
leader," and "sincere." 

Parker is part of a phenomenon 
that has emerged as one of the 
major stories of the '84 campaign — 
the tidal wave of popularity the 73- 
year-old Reagan is riding among 
young voters, especially those under 
25 years old. 

Virtually all the major national 
polls show Reagan with a strong 
lead over Mondale among 18-to-29- 
year-old voters. 

TANA SHEAR 



800 Center 
226-8951 

Wafk-ins 



The President's advantage swells 
to overwhelming proportions in sur- 
veys of under-25-y ear-old voters. In 
some of the polls, they give Reagan 
his largest margin of support. 

"The Democrats don't offer hope 
for the future like Reagan," explains 
James Bozajian, 18, a UCLA stu- 
dent. "My parents loved (John) 
Kennedy. I think Kennedy inspired 
young people much the same way 
Reagan does today." 

Reagan "has so much charisma, 
he convinces me," says Sharon Kin- 
caide, also an 18-year-old UCLA stu- 
dent. 

Linda Weber, an 18-year-old 
Northridge student, likes "his fight- 
ing spirit, like when he was shot (in 
the March, 1981, assassination at- 
tempt)." 

Danny Hill, 20, a Los Angeles City 
College student, describes himself 
as "from a second-class background, 
trying to make it into first class." He 
thinks his chances of accomplishing 
that are better under Reagan than 
Mondale. 

In just the last few weeks, such 
sentiments have helped Reagan win 
student preference polls at Fort 
Hays State, Kansas State, Texas, 
Oklahoma, Georgia, Florida State, 
Penn State, Virginia, and New 
Hampshire, among many other 
campuses. 

Such support is all the more start- 
ling in view of Reagan's behavior as 
governor of California, when he 
tried to fire campus administrators 
who disagreed with him, ruthlessly 
put down campus protests, sent 
police to attack wounded protestors 
at Berkeley's infirmary, and once 
told a press conference that "if stu- 



C.A.B.'s 

continues to provide the excitement 
on campus. This week's sponsor is 
Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
College Republicans 

We want everyone to remember 

REAGAN/BUSH '84 




LEADERSHIP THAT WORKS! 

Eagle's Den 

Riemer Center 
Clarion University of Pa. 



dents want bloodshed, they'll get 
bloodshed." 

And since 1980, Reagan has 
abolished student Social Security 
benefits, proposed cutting other stu- 
dent aid programs by as much as 50 
percent, tried to eliminate the U.S. 
Department of Education, support- 
ed tax breaks for segregationist 
colleges, presided over a 20 percent 
decline in student aid budgets, 
sought to limit laws prohibiting dis- 
crimination against campus women, 
and drastically reduced aid to col- 
lege libraries and black colleges, 
leges. 

Nevertheless, "there has been a 
steady increase in the values of per- 
sonal success as against wanting to 
contribute to social causes," notes 
Leonard Freedman, a UCLA politi- 
cal science professor and dean of the 
school's extension program. 

Alexander Astin of UCLA's Higher 
Education Resource Institute says 
his annual survey of incoming 
college freshmen confirms Freed- 
man 's analysis. 

The survey, for example, asks stu- 
dents what importance they attach 
to "developing a meaningful phil- 
osophy of life." 

During the height of the counter- 
culture, this value ranked as the 
most-popular among freshmen. At 
one point, it was rated important by 
85 percent of the respondents. 

Since the early 70s, the number of 
students calling "philosophy of life" 
an important goal has declined 
steadily, Astin said. 

In the most recent survey, only 45 
percent considered it an important 
value, while "being very weU off fi- 
nancially" was ranked as the top 
value by 70 percent. 

Reagan's devotion to the entrepre- 
neurial spirit fits nearly with the at- 
titude shift among young voters, 
Freedman says. 






The National Collegiate Athletic 
Association's (NCAA) 44-member 
Presidents' Commission says it will 
ask the NCAA's January convention 
to make it harder for freshmen ath- 
letes to play varsity sports. 

The presidents want frosh to have 
a combined 700 on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test or a 15 on the Amer- 
ican College Testing exam, and 
maintain a 2.0 in certain high school 
courses. 

The effort to get tougher on fr^h- 
men athletes began last year, but 
many minority educators fear the 
new rules effectively would elimin- 
ate many blacks from varsity 
sports, thus lessening their chances 
of going to college. 

Terrel Bell told the Chronicle of 
Higher Education that his biggest 
job in a second Reagan Administra- 
tion would be to keep Office Manage- 
ment aid Budget Director David 
Stockman's budget axe away from 
the U.S. Department of Education. 

"I think one of our useful roles is to 
continue to persuade David Stock- 
man that education is such a high 
priority that you have to put it along- 
side national defense when you con- 
sider budget levels," he said. 

UTEP's College of Engineering 
turns in the most cheating reports of 
all university departments, prob- 
ably because engineering courses 
are so hard, department Chairman 
Robert Reid says. 

Reid adds most of the reported 
cheaters are foreign students. 





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Four students will stand trial for 
negligent homicide and hazing in the 
October death of sophomore Bruce 
Goodrich, who died after being 
awakened in the middle of the night 
and forced to perform strenuous ex- 
ercises. 

Meanwhile, the parents of a Cal 
State-Chico student who died after 
being hazed during a pledge game, 
filed a $1 million suit against Tau 
Gamma Theta. 

Journalism Dean, Ralph Lowen- 
stein, has announced in a memo that 
students with "black. Cracker, New 
York or ethnic accents" can't be on 
the au- on the University of Florida's 
radio station. 

Lowenstein says it's "to realis- 
tically tell people with horrible ac- 
cents that they are not going to make 
it on the air." 

A federal appeals court judge has 
told the University of Michigan to let 
former student Scott Ewing retake a 
test and readmit him to med school 
if he passes. 

Ewing had charged UM "capri- 
ciously" had dropped him when it 
refused to let him retake a 1981 test 
that other students had been allowed 
to retake. 

The Study Group on the Conditions 
on Excellence in American Higher 
Education, a group of educators, has 
delivered a critique of U.S. colleges 
to Secretary of Education, Terrel 
Bell. 

"Riey hope the document will spur 
the kinds of reform talk that follow- 
ed the "Nation At Risk" report on 
high schools in April, 1983. 

The group says the number of high 
schoolers who don't attend college, 
the decline of faculty buying power, 
the student dropout rate and the 
drop in liberal arts enrollments are 
"danger signals" colleges are 
stumbling. 

Housing is so tight at USC that 
some students were able to sell their 
$50 a term dorm rooms to others for 
$300. 

Housing chief Bill Thompson con- 
demned the scalping, but added 
there's no law under which to prc^e- 
cute the students. 

Thompson suspects the practice 
• may be widespread. 

The Lewiston, Maine college fac- 
ulty has voted to drop Scholastic 
Aptitude Test scores to screen ap- 
plicants, replacing them with the re- 
sults of three other aptitude tests. 




NEWS TIP? 
2380 




SUSAN MUELLER 



photo by Chris Zawrotuk 



College Republicans promote 
Reagan and student voting 



By Karen A. Bauer 



Juris Kelley, President of the 
Clarion University College Repub- 
licans, recently stated in regard to 

voting this November 6, " do 

your duty, which is to be active. . . " 

The College RepubUcans here at 
Clarion are doing their best at pro- 
moting President Reagan, Congress- 
man Clinger and student voting in 
general. 

Congressman William Clinger is 
highly supported by the College Re- 
publicans. Clinger has recently met 
with success in a six year project to 
create wilderness area in the Al- 
legheny National Forest. This bill 
was recently passed by the Senate 
and House. 

"Clinger is a very nice man,' 
states Kelley. He is known for fre- 
quently responding to the letters he 
receives and often holds town meet- 
ings in non-election years. He does 
not campaign for other Republicans 
running for office, as he feels that 
his responsibilities as U.S. Congress- 
man are much too important to 
allow time for that. 

State Representative Bill Wachob, 
who is running against incumbent 
Clinger, has recently been supported 
by Gary Hart and Tip O'Neil in 
Pennsylvania. Clinger, on the other 
hand, does much of his own cam- 
paigning. The Collie Republicans 
at Clarion criticize Wachob for his 
"radical" voting record, his support 
of banning hand guns and his pro- 

mmmmA 



special interest group attitude. 

Election Day itself, Kelley be- 
lieves, should be treated as a sort of 
holiday. Schools and bars should be 
closed so everyone is free to do their 
duty as American citizens — vote. 
The College Republicans will be 
working with the County Republican 
Commission on Election Day. They 
will be at the polling areas to check 
off the names of registered Republi- 
cans who have voted and call ones 
who have not to remind them. The 
County Republicans are a well-or- 
ganized group here and are 
knowledgeable of the elderly Repub- 
licans in the county and provide 
transportation for them to the polls. 

When the polls close, the County 
Republicans and the College Re- 
publicans will likely have a large 
room(s) reserved at the Clarion 
Holiday Inn or Sheraton Inn, equip- 
ped with large screen televisions to 
monitor the results of the election on 
the major networks. Local election 
results wiU also be monitored. 

The Clarion University College 
Republicans now has about 35 mem- 
bers and Kelly expects to have at 
least 40 by November 6. Dr. 
Woodrow Yeaney of Clarion Univer- 
sity helped form the group here 
about 10 years ago. Today, he con- 
tinues to be their active advisor, 
"not just a figurehead," says KeUey. 

After the election is over, the 
group hopes to continue to meet at 
least once a month to keep its mem- 
bers abreast of political issues. 



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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984-5 



Communication major assumes 
position of new student trustee 



By Sxj^an OhXer 



Si£san Mueller officially became 
the new student trustee on the 
Clarion University Board of 
Trustees. 

The student trustee is the com- 
munications link between the Board 
of Trustees and the students and is a 
voting member of the Board. The 
Board makes decisions about such 
things as budget and housing polic- 
ies. 

In making her decision about how 
to vote on these important issues, 
Mueller says she, " — takes the 
students' opinions and combines 
them with information from the 
faculty and administration." 

Besides being a sophomore com- 
munications major, Mueller has 
many responsibilities to handle as 
student trustee. She must attend the 
meetings of the Board, Student Sen- 
ate, and Faculty Senate. At these 
meetings students' opinions on 
issues are heard. These opinions are 
then taken to the Board. 

The position of student trustee was 
created on college campuses in the 



late 1960s and early 1970s. To be- 
come the student trustee, an appli- 
cation for the position must be sub- 
mitted in April. Following accept- 
ance of the application, one must go 
through a series of interviews with 
the selection board and president of 
the college, a selection committee in 
Harrisburg and the Secretary of 
Education in Harrisburg. After ap- 
proval by the Secretary of Educa- 
tion, the name is sent to the governor 
who nominates the person for the 
position of student trustee to the gen- 



eral assembly. The general assem- 
bly votes on the applicant and if 
approved, the person serves as stu- 
dent trustee until their graduation. 
Mueller will graduate in 1987. 

According to Mueller, being stu- 
dent trustee is just "one more way of 
being active." She will travel to Her- 
shey, Pennsylvania on Nov. 16 and 
17 for a trustees conference. At the 
conference, there will be lectures 
and workshops on college admin- 
istration. 




ALL 
WOOD 



CASSETTE 
CRATES 

(Holds 17 tapes) 

ApoUodofiis 

K W ii II » l>iMW<.«i— K 



OPEN 

WEEKNIGHTS 

TILL 9. 



526 Main Street 

226-5431 



BILL WACHOB 

on Education 

As a three-term state representative, Bill Wachob has 
been one of Pennsylvania's most effective voices 
for consumers, working men and women, and the 
elderly. 

IF ELECTED I PROPOSE TO: 

1. Renew our national commitment to education. 

2. Enact a National Defense Education Act - Part II, which would 
restore federal funding to schools of all levels. 

3. Design high school curriculum to match job openings and re- 
quirements. 

4. Increase financial assistance for college students. 

5. Encourage talented students with special grants and long-term, 
low interest loans to pursue careers in areas of national need - 
i.e., research and development, rural health care, primary and 
secondary school teaching 

!• ••••••••••••••*•*•*•* *| 



TOTE! 



■^^ 



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ILL WACHOB FOR CONGRESS! 

Paid for by Young Democrats of Clarion University 



BIG EATER? PROVE IT. 

On Wednesday night, Nov. 14, at 8:00 P.M., The Eagle's 
Den is having a WOODA EATING CONTEST. 
That's right, we're going to see who the Biggest Eater at 
C.U.P. is. If you know a Real Man or Woman that you think is 
•capable of devouring the most Burgers in Vz an hour, encourage 
them to come over and try to win the following prizes: 



First: within V2 hour - $25.00 
Second: within V2 hour - $10.00 
^ Third: within 1/2 hour - $ 5.00 
Entry Fee: $4.00 per contestant 



^mr^ 



We're challenging all organizations, clubs, teams, fraternities 
and individuals to sponsor one of their favorite Big Eaters. 
Register at the Eagle's Den by Nov. 1 2 
Entry fee should be paid at this time. 



6-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday. Nov. 1. 1984- 



Handicapped children receive special aid 



Gov. Dick Thornburgh recently 
announced that approximately 5,000 
handicapped pre-school children in 
Pennsylvania will receive special 
help through "early intervention" 
programs for the first time this 
fiscal year, as a result of a $7.4 mil- 
lion interagency agreement between 
the state Departments of Education 
and Public Welfare. 

The agreement, along with a $9.2 
million increase in state funds 
sought by the Governor and 
approved by the General Assembly, 
will increase the total number of 
children served by such programs 
by nearly one-third. 

"The first five years of life are 
critical for all children and take on 
an even greater importance for 
youngsters with mental and physical 



GYN 
CHECKUPS 



handicaps," Thornburgh said. "This 
agreement will make it possible for 
us to help thousands of children be- 
fore their development is seriously 
impaired." 

Under the agreement, the Depart- 
ment of Education will channel $7.4 
million in state funds through the 
Commonwealth's 29 intermediate 
units to establish and expand local 
early intervention programs, par- 
ticularly for handicapped children. 
The Department of Public Welfare 
will also expand state funding to 
county mental health/mental 
retardation agencies to $15.1 million, 
an increase of $1.8 million over last 
year. As a result, the Commonwealth 
will spend $22.5 million in state funds 
for early intervention services this 
year, in addition to more than $9 mil- 



lion in federal funds. 

"By increasing the state's total 
commitment to early intervention, 
we have expanded the number of 
children served by each agency and 
improved our ability to plan and 
coordinate needed services," said 
Acting Secretary of Education Mar- 
garet A. Smith. 

"The Department of Public Wel- 
fare has a successful history of pro- 
viding early intervention services to 
mentally handicapped children 
through the county mental health 
and mental retardation programs," 
Secretary of Public Welfare Walter 
W. Cohen said. "This agreement will 
not only enable our department to 
increase funding for these vital 
county programs, but will also 
insure that children with other kinds 



of handicaps will benefit from such 
services." 

Expanded funding for early inter- 
vention programs was proposed by 
Governor Thornburgh in his 1984-85 
budget presentation and approved 
by the General Assembly. In 1983-84, 
Education Department programs 
served nearly 8,300 preschool 
children in the public schools. With 
the increase in funding, the depart- 
ment expects to serve approximate- 
ly 13,200 pre-schoolers during the 
current year. The Department of 
Public Welfare serves over 7,500 
preschool handicapped children 
through mental health and mental 
retardation programs and special- 
ized day care services 

A separate interagency agree- 
ment, which has just been signed by 



Secretary Cohen, Secretary Smith 
and Secretary of Health, H. Arnold 
Muller, will require that all state 
and local programs serving pre- 
school handicapped children be 
carefully coordinated to ensure that 
children with handicapping condi- 
tions are identified and receive ap- 
propriate services. 

The Education Department's 
early intervention expansion will be 
conducted by the public school sys- 
tem and by private providers under 
contract with the intermediate units. 
The department has begun distribut- 
ing guidelines for program opera- 
tion and evaluation, and funding will 
follow in late November. 




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Senate discusses Reading Day and finals 



By Dina Gruey 




Student concerns about Reading 
Day and the final exam schedule 
were shared by the Faculty Senate 
at its recent meeting last Monday 
since the current academic calendar 
failed to be submitted to the Senate 
for its approval. 

Reading or Study Day was intro- 
duced to the Faculty Senate by the 
Student Senate last spring as an at- 
tempt to give students a break be- 
tween the end of classes on Friday 
and the start of final exams on Sat- 



urday. It was designated as the last 
Friday of regular classes, to be used 
on a trial basis. This year, however, 
there will not be a Reading Day as 
such, since finals do not begin until 
the Monday after the end of classes 
under the proposed schedule. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Robert Edington, 
President Bond's delegate to the 
Senate, a Study Day is only slated 
for the Spring term in '85 because 
experimental changes to the final 
exam schedule this semester do not 
necessitate such a day. The rein- 
statement of Reading Day will 



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depend on future feedback from stu- 
dents and faculty on these experi- 
mental adjustments. 

Dr. Ken Traynor and Dr. Arnold 
Zaeske addressed a second concern 
posed by the final exam schedule: 
professors with multiple sections of 
a given class will not only be forced 
to administer exams on more occa- 
sions under the new system, but will 
also have to worry about "security 
problems" as well. Mrs. Kay Tray- 
nor explained that if there are three 
sections to one course, the last sec- 
tion to take the examination would 
have an unfair advantage over the 
first because the test questions will 
circulate during the two-day time- 
span separating the scheduled test- 
ing periods. 

As a result of these concerns, the 
Senate carried a motion for all aca- 
demic calendar adoption to be 
referred to its Policy Committee for 
inspection and approval. Dr. Harold 



Hartley stated that the current ac- 
tion of the Board of Trustees was in 
violation of the Faculty Senate's 
constitution and should be remedied. 
A motion by Dr. Traynor that the 
current final exam schedule not be 
recognized because the Faculty Sen- 
ate failed to be consulted was post- 
poned until the Nov. 5 meeting, at 
which time the Executive 
Committee of the Senate will give a 
report on the concern. 

In other business, Mr. Richard 
Snow suggested that the Student 
Senate committee governing the ex- 
penditures of the newly instated $10 
Educational Services Fee (also 
known as the University Services 
Fee and the Student Enhancement 
Fee) report to the Faculty Senate on 
a regular basis. Snow added that the 
ESF fee, set up to help finance li- 
brary aids and educational equip- 
ment and supplies, should not be 
treated as a "slush" fund. 



WCUC-FM covers elections 



WCUC-FM will broadcast com- 
plete election coverage on Tuesday, 
Nov. 6. All levels of the election will 
be covered including local, state, 
and national races. 

WCUC-FM is the only station in 
the area to broadcast complete 
election coverage. Broadcasting be- 



gins at 8 p.m. and will continue until 
all the results are in. WCUC-FM will 
also have interviews and updates 
with the candidates . 

For the most complete and recent 
coverage of the elections, WCUC- 
FM 91.7 will begin broadcasting 
Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 8 p.m. 



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Participants of the first Clarion hosted Pennsylvania Collegiate Choral Fes- 
tival sang in what Mr. Milutin Lazich, Director of Choirs at Clarion, state as 
"one of the best Pennsylvania Collegiate Choral Festivals in a long time." 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY. NOV. 1 
BREAKFAST: Cantaloupe (Fresh Banana when Cantaloupe is not in season), Fried Eggs. Cream 
of Wheat, Chilled Citrus Sections, Hot Cakes w/Hot Syrup, 

LUNCH: Split Pea Soup, Corn Chowder, Bart)ecufe Rib Sandwich, Chicken Pot Pie w/Biscuit, Corn 
Curls. 

DINNER: Split Pea Soup, Corn Chowder, Roast Pork w/Gravy, Roast Beef, Corn, Mashed Pota- 
toes, Butter, Beets. 

FRIDAY. NOV. 2 
BREAKFAST: Hard Boiled Eggs, Bacon, Fried Potatoes, Scrambled Eggs, Coffee Cake, Apple 
Fritters, w/Hol Syrup. Hot Oatmeal, Caramel Rolls. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Rice Soup, Boston Fish Chowder, Grilled Bamberger on Roll 
w/Sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce, Baked Macaroni and Cheddar Cheese, Corn Chips, 
Spanish Rice. 

DLNNER: Homemade Chicken Rice Soup, Boston Fish Chowder, Fried Perch Fillet, Baked Man- 
icotti, Corn Lyonnaise Potatoes, Mixed Southern Greens. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 3 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Blueberry Muffin, Grilled Spam, Fried Potatoes, Streusel Coffee 
Cake, French Toast w/Hot Syrup, Hot Oatmeal. 

LUNCH: Cream of Mushroom Soup, Beef Broth, Submarine Sandwich, Chili Con Carne, Potato 
Chips, Zucchini Squash. 

DINNER: Cream of Mushroom Soup, Beef Broth, Roast Top Round of Beef, Breaded Chicken 
Cutlet, Beans, Baked Potato w/Sour Cream, Mixed Vegetables. 

SINDAY, NOV. 4 
BRUNCH: Grapefruit Half, Thick Sliced Bacon, Tater Gerts. Cinnamon Rolls, Chilled Pineapple 
Slices, Open Face Reuben Sandwich w/Dill Pickle, Scrambled Eggs, Fresh Banana. Sausage 
Links, Hot Oatmeal, Coffee Cake. 

DINNER: Tomato Soup, Beef Broth, Baked Barbeque Chicken Eighths, Swedish Meat Balls, 
Glazed Apples, Mixed Wild and Long Grain Rice, Carrots. 

MONDAY, NOV. 5 
BREAKFAST: Chilled Grapefruit Half, Fried Eggs - Sunnyside or Over, English Muffins, Fried 
Potatoes, Apple Coffee Cake, Stewed Prunes, Blueberry Pancakes w/Hot Syrup. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup, Cream of Carrot Soup, Texas Tommie on Roll, 
Cream Chipped Beef on Toast, French Fries, White Corn. 

DINNER: Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup, Cream of Carrot Soup, Beef Ravioli, Battered Fried 
Fish, Parslied Noodles, Creamed Onions. 

TUEvSDAY. NOV.6 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Wheat, Corn Muffin, Fried Potatoes, French 
Toast w/Hot Syrup, Sausage Patty, French Crumb Cake. 

LUNCH : Cream of Potato Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Hot Breast of Turkey Sandwichw/Gravy , Corned 
Beef Hash, Hash Brown Potatoes, Wax Beans w/Pimento. 

DINNER: Cream of Potato Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Beef Stroganoff, Stuffed Veal Roll, Buttered 
Noodles, Corn, Mixed Vegetables. 

WEDNESDAY, .NOV.; 
BREAKFAST: Cantaloupe Wedge (Grapefruit Half when Cantaloupe is not in season). Cheese 
Omelette, Cream of Rice, Fried Potatoes, Caramel Buns, Juices, Sliced Peaches, Waffles w/Hot 
Syrup, Coffee Cake. 

LUNCH ; Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Cheeseburger on Roll ( Sliced Cheese 
w/sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce), Kolbassi Cooked in Sauerkraut, Corn Curls, Sauerkraut. 
DINNER: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Lasagna, Corned Beef Brisket, 
Mixed Vegetables, Delmonico Potatoes, Limas. 



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WITH 

DITZ'S LAYAWAY PLAN 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1. 1984—7 



Choral Festival sings proudly 



For the first time in Clarion Uni- 
versity's history, the 1984 Pennsyl- 
vania Collegiate Choral Festival 
was held at Clarion in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. 

Twenty-three colleges and uni- 
versities, including Bloomsburg, 
Grove City, Lock Haven, University 
of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, Penn 
State and Westminster attended the 
event. 

Each school was required to bring 
at least four students and no more 
than 12 to fill the soprano, alto, tenor 
and bass voice parts. 

One hundred sixty four students 
participated in the concert. Students 
from Clarion were: Erin Hill, Cathy 
McCracken, Lori McCracken, Beth- 
anne Boob, Pat Moore, Joan Vayda, 
Mike Garris, Greg Salser, Dean Sch- 
recengost, Tom Wotus, Robert Carr, 
Kris Eshghy, and Mike Ouzts. 

The highlight of the afternoon per- 
formance was Dr. Robert Page as 
the guest Conductor. Page is regard- 
ed as one of the most distinguished 
choral conductors of our country. He 
has worked with choirs in Pennsyl- 
vania, Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, New 
York, New Jersey, North Carolina 
and Virginia. 

Page graduated magna cum laude 
from Abilene Christian College and 
received his Master of Music degree 
from Indiana University. He did his 
doctoral study at New York Univer- 
sity. 

The Guest Pianist of the perform- 
ance was Annete Roussel-Pesche, 
Professor Emerita of Music at Clar- 
ion. The chairperson of the Depart- 
ment of Music at CUP, Donald 
Black, also was an accompanist at 
the concert. 

The concert began with "Spread 
Thy Voice Around", from Soloman, 



written by Handel. The first portion 
of the performance were songs of a 
sacred nature. After the intermis- 
sion, the group sang, "Four Chor- 
uses from CATULLI CARMINA," 
which was sung entirely in Latin, and 
Dr. Page narrated between chor- 
uses. The group performed a rousing 
round of voices when Copeland's, 
"Stomp Your Foot from TENDER- 
LAND," started up. 

The music kept the audience tap- 
ping their feet for the entire 45 
minute long concert. 

Before ending the concert. Dr. 
Page acknowledged his appreciation 
of the warm hospitality that the 
group received from Clarion choir 

members and people of the commu- 
nity since arriving in Clarion on 
Thursday morning to begin the total 
group practicing. Page stated, "Who 
knows. Clarion may be the best of all 
possible worlds," before beginning 



the well-known finale, "The Best of 
All Possible Worlds," from Leonard 
Bernstein's, "Candide." 

The students received a standing 
ovation for their performance. It 
was obvious that the group was well- 
rehearsed and very talented. The 
half-filled auditorium appreciated 
the fine show, however, the concert 
was not well attended by Clarion stu- 
dents. 

Milutin Lazich, Director of Choirs 
at Clarion, along with being the 
Festival Host, felt the show was 
simply, "dynamite." Mr. Lazich 
said, "It was one of the best Penn- 
sylvania Collegiate Choral Festivals 
in a long time due to the talent and 
abilities of not only the choir 
members, but of the most distin- 
guished members. Dr. Robert Page." 
Clarion is proud to have held this 
year's festival concert andh opes to 
have the honor again sometime in 
the future. 



PR CLARION ^^^"^^^ 

ly^^ UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SCHEDULE 





Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thi'sday 


Friday 


•;'.*.s 


Daiicftrcise 


Cncercise 


Dancercise 


Dj.,v.»:rcise 


Dancerct^«> 

Community 
Update 


.A re "J no 
Town 


Sports 
Center 5 


Sports 
Center .5 


The Energy 
Report 


30^ 


Around 
Town 


Sports 
Center 3 


The Energy 
Report 


Community 
Update 


Around 
Town 


TOO 


Sports 
Center 5 


The Energy 
Report 


Community 
Update 


Around 
Town 


Community 
Update 


':30 


Dancercise 


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WE ARE HERE 



The United 
Campus Ministry 



700 WOOD STREET 

BASEMENT OF PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

226-6402 




OFHCE HOURS 

MON. 9 a.m. -12 p.m. 

TUES. I p.m. -4 p.m. 

WED. 9a.m.-I2p.m. &I-4p.m, 

THURS. 9a.m.-I2p.m. 

FRl. 9 a.m. -12 p.m. 



8-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday. Nov. 1, 1984 

In troducing 



By Kathy Lemunyon 



There are people who hate their 
jobs. "Diere are people who like their 
jobs. And, there are people who love 
their jobs. Fortunately for Qarion 
University, Rich Herman, the Di- 
rector of Sports Information, is in 
the last category. 

Herman sums up his duties in a 
deceptively simple sentence: "I 
handle publicity for the 17 intercol- 
legiate sports." 

What this involves is sports re- 
leases, results and statistics for 
every match, game, meet or other 
competition involving CUP athletes. 
Herman also plays a major role in 
the photography of certain events 
and the production of brochures for 
all sports. 

He attends as many events as pos- 



sible, sets up interviews between 
media, coaches, and players, and 
does every thing he can to get CUP 
sports in the media. 

Through his efforts, Clarion Uni- 
versity's football team has been 
featured on Channel 11 several 
times, and was listed in Sports lUu- 
strated's pre-season magazine as 
ranked number three of all Division 
n teams in the country. These 
efforts keep him busy seven days a 
week, for more than eight hours a 
day. "Any less," Herman says, "is 
not effective. Fortunately, I have a 
very supportive wife." 

Herman, who resides in Clarion, 
graduated from Point Park College 
in 1976 with a degree in Journalism 
and Communications. 

For two years after graduation he 
experimented with various com- 



Second production scheduled 



The University Theatre is proud to 
announce that preparations are in 
full swing for the second production 
of the year. Angel Street, directed by 
Dr. Mary Hardwick. 

The play, written by Patrick 
Hamilton, takes place in 1880 in the 
Pimlico district of London. It deals 
with the slow, torturous plans of a 
madman to drive his wife insane. 
The fascination of the play hinges on 
the detective's cleverness in bring- 
ing about the downfall of his evil 



intentions. 

Cast in the play are Irma Levy and 
David Knapp, who both recently ap- 
peared in the University production 
of "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." Also ap- 
pearing are Joan Bartell, Susan Boll 
and Bryan Koehler. 

The play, formerly entitled "Gas- 
light", is to be performed in the 
Marwick-Boyd Uttle Theatre, Nov. 
13-17 at 8:15 p.m. Tickets and res- 
ervations will be available soon. 



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CLARION, PA. 

226-7200 



munications-related jobs, and then 
became a member of the EUwood 
aty Police Youth Bureau. Herman 
recalls: "We didn't arrest people 
and we didn't wear uniforms but we 
did everything else. . .we rode to 
crime scenes and I testified in sev- 
eral trials." 

The Bureau conducted various 
youth recreation and education pro- 
grams and was awarded a Gover- 
nor's Justice Commission Grant, an 
event Herman remembers with 
pride. "We accomplished a lot, we 
were in demand." 

Herman accepted a full-time grad- 
uate assistantship in Sports Infor- 
mation at Edinboro in 1979 while 
working toward a Master's Degree 
in Public Administration. On Agust 
25, 1980, nine credits short of grad- 
uation, he left Edinboro to take the 
job of Director of Sports Information 
at CUP. While some people may 
think it an unwise decision, Herman 
states: "I weighed the possibilities. 
While getting my Masters was and is 
still important to me, I felt that 
getting the job was more import- 
ant." As if to demonstrate this point, 
Herman reveals with a smile that he 
is enrolled in the Graduate School of 
Communications at Clarion Uni- 
^'ersity. 

Ask Herman what he likes about 
his job and he will answer with a 
deluge of enthusiastic thought. 
"When you think about it, Qarion is 
the only Western Pennsylvania col- 
lege that is not located in a major 
media market. I like the challenge of 




'•Most important to anyone in my field 
them you simply can't function properly 
Information. 

penetrating those major markets. . . 
I enjoy meeting so many interesting 
people. . .It's a lot of fun; it is excit- 
ing and challenging and takes in 
every part of public relations imag- 
inable. . .Sports Information to me is 
a very unique job." 

When asked what he would like to 
change about his job there were min- 
utes of silence before he thought of a 
single thing: "First of all, the ad- 



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is credibility and integrity, without 
Rich Herman, Director of Sports 

photo by Dan Roberts 

ministration has been extremely 
supportive. When I came to Clarion I 
had four student workers. I now have 
five students and one G.A. But I still 
wish that I had more, not to make 
my job easier, but so that we could 
cover more events. Maybe that falls 
into greed, I don't know." 

Greedy? Perhaps, but greed does 
not mean hugging the limelight. 
Herman is quick to give credit. "The 
administrative support is fantastic. 
Also, coach for coach, Clarion has 
the best staff in the state. They are 
extremely knowledgeable. 

Our Athletic Director, Frank Lig- 
nelli is a great help. I think that it is 
because of him that our staff is so 
good." And of course, the Qarion 
tradition helps. "This school is 
proud of its athletic achievements. 
It's easy to write about winners. Our 
athletic program is outstanding and 
dynamic." 

Herman points out his primary 
task as, "My challenge is to under- 
stand the uniqueness in each sport 
and to report it accordingly. When 
unique opportunities occur, you 
have to see them, recognize them, go 
after them. You have to seize the 
moment." 



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HAVE YOUR DINNER DELIVERED! 

IVIanicotti $3.50 Egg Plant Parmigana . $4.25 

Cheese Ravioli . $3.50 Veal Cutlet Parmigiana $5.25 

Meat Ravioli . . . $3.50 Spaghetti w/Tomato Sa. $2.75 

Stuffed Shells . . . $3.50 Spaghetti w/Meatballs . . $3.75 

Lasagna $3.50 sjiaghetti w/Meat Sa. . . . $3.75 

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Center Board attends conference 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Nov. 1, 1984-9 



By Peggy Cudzil 



Recently four Clarion University 
Center Board members attended an 
Association of College Unions - In- 
ter-national (ACU-I) conference at 
Moravian College in Bethlehem, Pa. 

The participants heard lectures 
and held discussions on such sub- 
jects as: how to get students involv- 
ed, how to run meetings and how to 
produce low-cost programming. Not 
only did the students and staff hear 
others speak on these subjects, but 
they had the opportunity to interact 
with students and staff from 24 other 
colleges in Region 1. 

Elections were also held at the 
conference for two representatives 
from each college. Dave Tomeo was 
elected as staff rep, and Deb Mag- 
ness was elected as student rep. 

The other two Clarion participants 
were Carolyn Starcher and Amiette 
Shields, two Centerboard committee 
chairpersons. They, along with the 
two representatives, report back to 
Centerboard, which consists of six 
faculty and 10 students, on new ideas 
they may have gained over the three 
days. This year much enthusiasm 
was generated at the assembly and 
many new ideas were put forth on 
improving programs. Next year's 
meeting is scheduled to be held at 
the University of Maryland in 
College Park, Md. 

Centerboard has been responsible 



for bringing in campus-wide activi- 
ties to Clarion since 1%7. These ac- 
tivities incliKle weekly movies, con- 
c&cts, dances, arts, coffeehouses and 



special events. Centerboard's total 
of 85 members work together to gen- 
erate activities of interest for the 
students at Clarion University. 




Center Board members attend Association of College Unions and return 
with Representative positions. Seated from left to right, Carolyn Starcher, 
Deb Magness; Standing left to right, Annette Shields, Dave Tomeo. 

photo by Dan Roberts 



Classifieds 



Diamond - Yellow gold Keepsake 
engagement ring set, traded in on 
larger diamond, but is in like- 
new condition. Three ring set: 
Engagement ring, lady's wedding 
band and man's wedding band. 
Brand new $1,000. Special price 
$440. Only at James Jewelers, 
Clarion. 226-8711. Use our lay- 
away plan. 

Earn free travel and extra money as 
a campus rep!!! N.E. No. 1 stu- 
dent travel company is seeking 
reps for its Bermuda, Bahamas, 
Florida, and spring break trips. 
Call person-to-person collect to 
Paul at (617) 449-1112 9 a.m.-5 
p.m. or (617) 444-7863 6-10 p.m. 

APSCUF is soliciting applications 
from sophomore-senior students 
for two (2) $350 scholarships to be 
awarded for spring semester, 
1985. Applications are available at 
the APSCUF office, 360 Founders 
Hall, 8:30-12:30 daily. Application 
deadline is Nov. 19, 1984. 



National Lampoon's Animal House 
starring John Belushi. Wednes- 
day, Nov. 7, 1984. Showing at 7 
p.m. and 9:15 p.m. in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. Admission 
$1.00. Sponsored by Tau Kappa 
Epsilon. 

Part-time Dance Instructor - exper- 
ienced in ballet, jazz or tap. Pos- 
sible credit for internship. Inter- 
ested and qualified call 226-4132 or 
275-4849. Leave message w/ser- 
vice or stop in at Dancer's Studio, 
(above Bob's Subs), Main Street, 
Clarion. 

Government Jobs. $16,559-$50.553/ 
year. Now hiring. Your area. Call 
805-687-6000, Ext. R-6334. 

HELP WANTED: Campus rep to 
run spring break vacation trip to 
Daytona Beach. Earn free trip 
and money. Send resume to Col- 
lege Travel Unlimited, P.O. Box 
6063, Station A, Daytona Beach, 
Florida 32022, include phone num- 
bers please. 



For Sale: In dash AM/FM/MPX- 
cassette car stereo. Auto stop. 
Locking FF, Lo/DX $35.00 6x9 
triaxles, 350 watts max. $25.00 
pair. Everything new, never in- 
stalled. Wayne 226-9108. 

Is it true you can buy jeeps for $44 
through the U.S. Government? 
Get the facts today! Call (312) 
742-1142, Ext. 3701. 

5 round trip tickets to San Juan, 
Puerto Rico from PGH-Jan. 3-12. 
$334.20. Interested? Call 226-7351 
after 9 p.m. 

Laurie and Cindy, Stay sane; it's 
not much longer. Good luck with 
Cousin Bill. Netta. 

Therefore God has highly exaulted 
Him and bestowed on Him the 
name which is above every name, 
that at the name of Jesus, every 
knee should bow, in Heaven and on 
Earth and under the Earth, and 
every tongue confess that Jesus 
Christ is Lord to the glory of God 
the Father. 



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Devil himself visits chapel 



By Margie Zerbe and 
Lou Klingensmith 



Beelzebub, Lucifer, Satan. . .his 
names are many. The devil himself 
made a personal appearance to 
Clarion's chapel. 

"The Devil, You Say?" was a uni- 
que, convincing one-act play written 
and performed by Scott Keely. 

The play was presented to a crowd 
of approximately 50 people. Props, 
consisting of two candles, a wooden 
box, mirror, stool, and coat rack, 
added just the right touch to the at- 
mosphere of the production. 

The "handsome devil" himself 



quoted passages from the works of 
Twain, Dostoevsky, Mellville and 
the Bible. He also used the audience 
in his presentation and kept them 
chuckling at his "devilish" wit! 

During the show, the devil stated: 
"We all have the power to create and 
the power to destroy. ' ' 

"In everything — every word, 
every image — there is Truth. . .and 
there is a lie. It is for you to decide 
which is which," added this Satan. 

These and other thought-provok- 
ing quotations provided the care- 
fully laid out message of the play; 
which is "Man's worst enemy is 
himself." 




10-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 



Bloomsburg prof has emotional visit to U.S.S.R 



By Grace Coleman 

Staff Writer 

Bloomsburg University Voice 



While walking down the crowded 
sidewalks of Moscow, the clicking of 
her footsteps echoed into the past. 
Recreating the steps that Stanislav- 
ski took to work, Dr. Marci A. Wood- 
ruff, Bloomsburg University theatre 
{M-ofessor, stood in front of the board- 
ed-up, old Moscow theatre. There, 
she imagined the glory that the old, 
crumbling, theatre, once had. . and 
the great man who had worked 
there. Tears came to her eyes as oth- 
er Soviets walked by, not realizing 
the greatness they were ignoring. 

Woodruff's eyes sparkled as she 
told of her trip to the Soviet Union 
and of the Eighth Congress of the In- 
ternational Association for Theatre 
in Young Audiences (A.S.S.I.T.E.J.), 
which met there. 

"Nothing in my wildest dreams. . . 
of all the hopes I had. . .it couldn't 
have prepared me for what actually 
happened," says Woodruff. 

The Congress is held every three 
years in different parts of the world. 
The Seventh Congress was held in 
France, and the Ninth will be in 



Adelaide, Austraiha. 

The purpose of the A.S.S.I.T.E.J. 
Congress is to promote communica- 
tion between experts of children's 
theatre in different countries. This 
year's Congress was held Sept. 17-23, 
in Moscow. One-hundred-sixty-one 
delegates from 42 countries attend- 
ed. Woodruff was one of the 20 del- 
egates sent to represent the United 
States. She was one of two profes- 
sors chosen; the other 18 work com- 
mercially in children's theatre. 

Woodruff was selected by the ex- 
ecutive board of A.S.S.I.T.E.J. Ac- 
cording to Woodruff, the board bas- 
ed their decisions on the individual's 
reputation in the field, and involve- 
ment in the American Theatre As- 
sociation, and the Children's Thea- 
tre Association of which Woodruff is 
the executive secretary. 

According to Woodruff, the high- 
light of her trip was being selected to 
study with Korogodsky, the artistic 
director of the Leningrad Children's 
Theatre. She plans to go to the Soviet 
Union to study and be his assistant in 
two or three years. 

In order to be selected, each coun- 
try needed to choose a delegate as a 
nominee. The nomineees had a one- 



hour interview with the Soviet Min- 
ister of Culture and a three-hour in- 
terview with Korogodsky. 

Korogodsky's stipulation, says 
Woodruff, was that the person be a 



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...the highlight of her trip 
was being selected to study 
with Korogodsky. 

young director. He was looking for 
an "artistic companion," says 
Woodruff. 

Woodruff accepted Korogodsky's 
open invitation to come to the Soviet 
Union and study with him when she 
speaks fluent Russian. According to 
Woodruff, the invitation is open to 
her whenever she chooses. For the 
past 10 years, Woodruff has studied 
any available works by Korogodsky. 
States Woodruff, "Conferences 
are important because they address 
major issues that we are concerned 
with the children's theatre, such as 
raising prestige in children's theatre 
and higher quality plays." 

"The Russians have the highest 
quality of children's theatre in the 
world," she states. According to 
Woodruff, every town over the pop- 
ulation of 6,000 must have a chil- 
dren's theatre. Playwrights, actors, 
and directors in children's theatre 
are paid 30 percent more than those 
not involved in children's theatre. 

Children's theatre is not as pres- 
tigious in the United States, says 
Woodruff. She explains that not only 
do most theatre goers in the United 
States look down on children's thea- 
tre, but so does most of the theatre 
profession. She says the reason for 
this could be a "lack of respect for 
children here." 

According to Woodruff, the Soviet 
Union greeted all delegates warmly. 



After being picked up at the airport 
in a chauffeured limousine, Wood- 
ruff was greeted by "Welcome 
Eighth Congress of A.S.S.I.T.E.J." 
banners which hung from the 
throughfares in the city, she says. 

Chemenko spoke for the first time 
in six months, at A.S.S.I.T.E.J.'s 
opening assembly, claims Woodruff. 
Other speakers included the Mayor 
of Moscow and the Minister of Cul- 
ture. According to Woodruff, news of 
the A.S.S.I.T.E.J. conference was 
featured daily on the first page of the 
Pravda, a Soviet newspaper, and on 
the prime time news. Commemor- 
ative candy bars were issued and a 
reception was held for the delegates 
at the Kremlin. 

Among the delegates at the Con- 
gress were Nellie McCaslin and 
Moses Goldberg. The latter is Wood- 
ruff's mentor. Goldberg is the artis- 
tic director of "Stage One," which is 
a major professional children's 
theatre company in the United 
States, says Woodruff. Woodruff at- 
tended Florida State University in 
order to work under him, she says, 
and after working with him, they 
kept in "close contact." "Moses is 
my spiritual and intellectual guide," 
states Woodruff. 

The congress had many different 
components. Three children's plays 



were the importance of working to- 
gether, and peace. If any message 
were conveyed, she said they were 
very subtle. 

Woodruff does not deny the reality 
that children's theatre in the Soviet 
Union is used as a method to so- 
cialize children to current Soviet 
values, but she states that she did 
not find any outward examples of 
this at the conference. However, 
such a play as "Ice Wolf" wouldn't 
be presented there because it stres- 
ses individuality, says Woodruff. 

"For me, the trip was a pilgrim- 
age," she says. Many of the papers 
that Woodruff has written are about 
Soviet theatre. "American theatre, 
as we know it, would not exist with- 
out the Russian influence of the 
early 20th century," she says. 

Because of her interest in Russian 
theatre. Woodruff visited the homes 
of theater greats, Chekov and Stan- 
islavski. In many places she was 
"brought to tears." "The Russians 
are warm loving, good hearted peo- 
ple who are passionate about work," 
says Woodruff. 

She explained that at no time was 



-"they want the same things 
the Americans did: a warm 
place to live, food to eat, a 
good life for their children 

were done daily by professional °"" peace. 

theatre companies. While children's 




plays in the United States last one 
hour, those done in the Soviet Union 
last three hours. Woodruff says her 
favorite play at the Congress was 
"Bambi," done by the Leningrad 
Children's Theatre. 

Besides sharing information, col- 
leagues participated in ASSITEJ's 
business meetings, commissions, 
and elections. Commissions were 
held in four major areas. Godberg 
was the leader in commission three: 
"Prestige of theatre for children and 



she prohibited to go anywhere. She 
states, "If the KGB (Soviet secret 
police) did follow me, I never 
noticed." The only obvious things 
tourists cannot do, says Woodruff is 
take pictures of airports, train sta- 
tions, and military installations. 

During the conference, people who 
spoke five to 10 different languages 
were gathered together, in which 
"communication seemed simple. . . 
we want the same things. . .we care 
about the same things. Why can't 



•i-restigeouneatreiorcmiarenana governments do that?" Woodruff 
young people, means to popularize J^Q^jers. 

Says Woodruff, "I had a reaffir- 



it," in which Woodruff participated 
When Woodruff was not in meetings 
or viewing plays, she socialized with 
other delegates. Woodruff says she 
spent time at the Soviet Actor's 
Club, which was open to the dele- 
gates. 

According to Woodruff, the most 
surprising aspect of the conference 
was that the plays were not overt 
political messages. Of the 18 plays 



mation of something I believe 
strongly in. People are the same 
wherever you are." After spending 
time with the Russian people, Wood- 
ruff commented, "They wanted the 
same things Americans did: a warm 
place to live, food to eat, a good life 
for their children, and peace." 

(Reprinted with permission from 



presented, the values suggested the Bloomsburg University Voice.) 




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12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 



Player of the week 



By Dina Gruey 



Here at Clarion University, many 
athletes have been recognized over 
the years for their outstanding tal- 
ents and skills. Unfortunately, few 
females have been given this honor. 
What's more, even fewer women's 
volleyball players have gained much 
recognition. This past week, how- 
ever, Junior Suzie Seanor was 
named to the Edinboro All-Tourna- 
ment Team, rightfully earning her 
the distinction of "Athlete of the 
Week." 

Suzie's athletic talents are rather 
diversified. During her years at 
Hempfield High School (Greens- 
burg, Pa.), she played volleyball, 
basketball, and ran track. Here at 



Qarion, Suzie has been involved in 
those three sports as well. This year, 
however, she has decided to concen- 
trate only on volleyball. She says 
that her decision against partici- 
pating in basketball and track this 
season has much to do with her lack 
of free time. Practices for volleyball 
alone are two hours a day, with tour- 
naments on the weekends. "When I 
was a freshman, I was involved in 
all three sports and I was always at 
a game or practice because as soon 
as one sport's season would end, 
another would just begin. After a 
while, it just got to be too much." 

On the volleyball court, Suzie is 
considered a Middle and Outside 
Hitter. Contrary to what many 
people may think, a lot of mental 




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preparation is involved in the sport. 
"Besides enjoying playing, you have 
to want to play. There are a lot of 
times when I just feel like quitting, 
but I pick myself up and keep 
playing," Suzie explains. This sea- 
son, the quiet, reserved Junior has 
helped the Lady Eagales to maintain 
a winning record. With only a few 
weeks left of the volleyball season, 
Suzie is looking forward to relaxing 
until the '85 schedule starts next 
August.. 

After graduating, Suzie plans to 
receive her Masters Degree in 
Speech Pathology and then work in 
her field at a hospital or clinic. As 
for a possible coaching job, she sighs 
that she would rather take a break 
from sports for a wh^e after grad- 
uation, but considers an assistant- 
coaching position in some sport as a 
possibility in a few years. 

Whether it be playing volleyball or 
basketball, running track, working 
in therapy, or coaching, Suzie 
Seanor displays the winning attitude 
necessary to excel in whatever she 
undertakes. 

Sports 

Tip 

2380 



BELOW ARE 
ALL THE RE ASONS YOU 
SHOULDN'T EAT AT 
THE EAGLE'S DEN... 



McFarland's/Skoal Bandits 



'Tick The Winner 



J J 



-Rice 

3oston College 

-Virginia 

-Oregon 

-Wake Forest 

^Pittsburgh 

Florida State 

_Penn 

-Air Force 

-Lock Haven 

-Cleveland 

-Green Bay 

-Houston 

-Kansas Qty. 

_L.A. Raiders 

_N.Y. Giants 

_Philadelphia 

_San Diego 

.Cincinnati 

_L.A. Rams 

_Miami 

_New England 



at Arkansas 
at Penn State 
at W. Virginia 
at UCLA 
at Clemson 
at Syracuse 
at Arizona State 
at Princeton 
at Army 
at Clarion 
at Buffalo 
at New Orleans 
at Pittsburgh 
at Seattle 
at Chicago 
at Dallas 
at Detroit 
at Indianapolis 
at San Francisco 
at St. Louis 
atN.Y.Jets • 
at Denver 
TIE BREAKER 

at Washington 



-Atlanta 

-Predict the winner and final score 



Last week's winner was Jean Blackwood. Please come in and get 

your prize. 

This week's winner is Eric Lieb. 

CONTEST RULES 

1) All entries must be received in the office of tlie Qarion Call on the Friday following publicaUon 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entranU must be currently enrolled at aarion University or be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimilies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant picking the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involvmg the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be final. 



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Harriers place seventh at 
states championships 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984—13 



Senior spotlight 



By David Pound 



The men's cross country team 
traveled to Slippery Rock University 
Saturday to compete for the State 
Championship. Clarion finished 
seventh out of the 14 teams that par- 
ticipated. Edinboro University, who 
placed in the 1, 5, 12, 14, and 19th 
positions, won the team meet. Luke 
Graham, also of Edinboro, took first 
in the individual honors. One- 
hundred runners competed in the 
meet. 

The Golden Eagle runners did an 
excellent job of getting out front 
early, and staying grouped together. 
The main goal was to run together as 
a team, and to finish in the middle of 
the pack. Clarion accomplished 
their goals by finishing seventh as 
they finished ahead of Slippery 
Rock, Mansfield, and Lock Haven; 
teams that they lost to during the 
regular season. 

Finishing 23rd overall and first for 
Clarion was Jim Snyder. Jim ran an 
excellent race and has been getting 
stronger each week. Greg Garstecki 
placed 28th and ran the best race of 
his college career. Scott DeLaney 
and Doug McConnell ran the course 



although they were still recovering 
from ilbiesses. Scott finished 32nd 
while Doug placed 45th. Bob Smith, 
who was suffering from a severely 
sprained ankle, finished 50th. 
Following Smith for Clarion were 
Jay Rogers and Pelligrino Ciccarel- 
lo. Clarion improved considerably 
from last year's state competition 
where they finished 13th. 

The top four teams behind 
Ekiinboro were: Indiana University 
of Pa., second; East Stroudsburg, 
third; Millersville, fourth, and Ship- 
pensburg, fifth. 

Following Graham in individual 
competition were: Bill King of 
Millersville, second; Steve Spence of 
Shippensburg, third; Mark Gerber 
of East Stroudsburg, fourth, and 
Tom Borawski of Edinboro, fifth. 

Coach Bill English gave all the 
credit of Clarion's excellent per- 
formance to everyone on the team. 
He said the team entered the meet 
with a very confident attitude and 
every runner gave 110 percent. He 
praised the whole team on their fine 
accomplishment of staying grouped 
together, something he has empha- 
sized throughout the season. The 
runners ran with determination and 



obtained their goals that they had 
set to achieve. 

English stated that Jim Snyder 
ran the best race of his life, and did 
an excellent job of finishing 23rd in 
the nation's strongest conference of 
runners. He commended the effort 
and determination of Scott 
DeLaney, Bob Smith and Doug 
McConnell, who due to injury or 
illness could not physically give 100 
percent. Pelligrino Ciccarello has 
improved considerably since last 
year, and is looking forward to next 
season. Senior Jay Rogers did an 
outstanding job for Clarion this 
year. This was Jay's first year of 
competition in cross country. Even 
though he lacked experience, he did 
an excellent job for the Golden 
Eagles. Coach English stated that 
Greg Garstecki has been a consist- 
ent performer all season. 

Coach Bill English congratulated 
his runners for a fine performance 
and for an excellent season. 

This Saturday Jim Snyder and 
possibly Greg Garstecki and Jay 
Rogers will compete in the NCAA 
Division II North East Regional 
Conference Championship. 



By Michelle Michael 



Running seven days a week, twice 
a day has gotten Bob Smith, co- 
captain of this year's men's cross 
country team, where he is today - 
one of the lead runners. 

Bob Smith, 'Smitty', is a senior 
business major with a strong inter- 
est in real estate. 

Bob has only been running for the 
Clarion cross-country team for two 
years, in 1982 and this 1984 season. 
He also ran for Clarion track in 1983 
and in 1984. 

Bob was elected co-captain along 
with Scott Delaney by his other 
teammates. The reason behind his 
election is because of his develop- 
ment as a runner over the past year. 

Bill English, coach of the men's 
cross-country and track teams, said, 
"Bob has very good self-motivation, 
and as a result he has developed his 



running." He also added that he 
feels Bob has developed 300 percent 
as a runner because of his attitude 
and consistency. 

Smith, 5'H", 150 pound runner is 
having a winning season and has 
been sharing the lead spotlight with 
Delaney. The team's record now 
stands at 4-3, and they are looking 
for more wins when they take on 
Slippery Rock and Mansfield this 
Saturday. 

Coach English feels that Smith 
will be pushing for the 1500 meter 
record (3.53 minutes) in this 1985 
track season. The record is pres- 
ently held by George Drushel. Smith 
qualified for states last track season 
when he ran the 1500 meter in 4.01 
minutes. 

English added with a strong feel- 
ing, "I feel that his (Smith) being 
elected captain, has turned out to be 
an excellent leader 



Hard work equals victory 



By Shelly Eckenroth 



Determined to improve on last 
year's disappointing season, the 12- 
member Clarion University wo- 
men's basketball team, coached by 
Doris Black, started practice on Oct. 
15. 

Returning lettermen of the squad 
are senior Rhonda Smith and soph- 
omores Kathy Young, Stephanie 
Woika, and Sherry Holderbaum. The 
remainder of the team consists of 
incoming freshmen Cathi Evans, 
Tammy Holman, Brenda Kelly, Lisa 
McAdoo, Karry Simmel, Kim 
Taylor, Jackie Turak and Angela 
Williams. 

The team's goal is to have a .500 
season, and along with the team 
goal, many of the individual players 
have personal goals which they want 
to achieve. 

Coach Black's outlook on the 
season is that the team is young and 
many of the freshmen are excited 
and fearful about playing college 



basketball. However, the returning 
lettermen add maturity to the young 
team as well as a great deal of lead- 
ership. The team has all around tal- 
ent, and Coach Black says that she 
could call on any ball player with 
confidence in getting the job done. 

Some changes have been made for 
the 1984-85 women's basketball 
league. First, they are playing with 
a smaller ball which is designed to 
improve ball handling and make the 
game more exciting. Coach Black 
predicts that eventually some 
women in the Division I League will 
be dunking in no time. While the idea 
of a smaller ball has many possible 
benefits, it seems to be creating 
problems in shooting accuracy. 
Coach Black says the smaller ball 
has been a benefit and predicts that 
the shooting accuracy will come in 
time. 

Another new rule this season is the 
back court rule. Once the player 
crosses the back court line, the ball 
will go to the opposing team. 



Coach Black's season philosophy 
is, "If you work hard, you can't 
lose." She also said, "We have over- 
all good basketball talent. My play- 
ers know how and like to win. The 
team has a strong sense of unity. We 
feel as coaches, that our overall 
program will be different with hard 
work. We're hoping it will pay off in 
the end." 



THE 

DEPOT 

BUSES & USED BOOKS 

340 MAIN STREET 

CLARION, PA. 16214 

PH. 814-226-4534 



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12— THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 



Player of the week 



By Dina Gruey 



Here at Clarion University, many 
athletes have been recognized over 
the years for their outstanding tal- 
ents and skills. Unfortunately, few 
females have been given this honor. 
What's more, even fewer women's 
volleyball players have gained much 
recognition. This past week, how- 
ever, Junior Suzie Seanor was 
named to the Edinboro All-Tourna- 
ment Team, rightfully earning her 
the distinction of "Athlete of the 
Week." 

Suzie's athletic talents are rather 
diversified. During her years at 
Hempfield High School (Greens- 
burg, Pa.), she played volleyball, 
basketball, and ran track. Here at 



Qarion, Suzie has been involved in 
those three sports as well. Tliis year, 
however, she has decided to concen- 
trate only on volleyball. She says 
that her decision against partici- 
pating in basketball and track this 
season has much to do with her lack 
of free time. Practices for volleyball 
alone are two hours a day, with tour- 
naments on the weekends. "When I 
was a freshman, I was involved in 
all three sports and I was always at 
a game or practice because as soon 
as one sport's season would end, 
another would just begin. After a 
while, it just got to be too much." 

On the volleyball court, Suzie is 
considered a Middle and Outside 
Hitter. Contrary to what many 
people may think, a lot of mental 




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at Rodger's Barber Shop 

(next to Captain Loomis Hotel) 

Before you go home on vacation, 
get any style 

HAIRCUT 
For Only $5.00 

We have three barber stylists 
to give you quicl<, satisfactory service. 

WHY PAY MORE? 



preparation is involved in the sport. 
"Besides enjoying playing, you have 
to want to play. There are a lot of 
times when I just feel like quitting, 
but I pick myself up and keep 
playing," Suzie explains. This sea- 
son, the quiet, reserved Junior has 
helped the Lady Eagales to maintain 
a winning record. With only a few 
weeks left of the volleyball season, 
Suzie is looking forward to relaxing 
until the '85 schedule starts next 
August- 
After graduating, Suzie plans to 
receive her Masters Degree in 
Speech Pathology and then work in 
her field at a hospital or clinic. As 
for a possible coaching job, she sighs 
that she would rather take a break 
from sports for a whye after grad- 
uation, but considers an assistant- 
coaching position in some sport as a 
possibility in a few years. 

Whether it be playing volleyball or 
basketball, running track, working 
in therapy, or coaching, Suzie 
Seanor displays the winning attitude 
necessary to excel in whatever she 
undertakes. 

Sports 

Tip 

2380 



BELOW ARE 
ALL THE RE ASONS YOU 

SHOULDN'T EAT AT 
THE EAGLE'S DEN... 



McFarland's/Skoal Bandits 



Get the message? 



"Pick The Winner 



3 3 



_Rice 

.Boston College 
.Virginia 
.Oregon 
_Wake Forest 
^Pittsburgh 
.Florida State 
J*enn 



.Air Force 
.Lock Haven 
.Cleveland 
.Green Bay 
.Houston 
.Kansas City. 
Jj.A. Raiders 
_N.Y. Giants 
.Philadelphia 
_San Diego 
.Cincinnati 
_L.A.Rams 
_Miami 
_New England 



.Atlanta 



at Arkansas 
at Penn State 
at W. Virginia 
at UCLA 
at Clemson 
at Syracuse 
at Arizona State 
at Princeton 
at Army 
at Clarion 
at Buffalo 
at New Orleans 
at Pittsburgh 
at Seattle 
at Chicago 
at Dallas 
at Detroit 
at Indianapolis 
at San Francisco 
at St. Louis 
atN.Y.Jets • 
at Denver 
TIE BREAKER 

at Washington 



J»redict the winner and final score 



Last week's winner was Jean Blackwood. Please come in and get 

your prize. 

This week's winner is Eric Lieb. 

CONTEST RULES 

1) All entries must be received in the office of the Clarion Call on the Friday following publicaUon 
by 5 p.m. NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED. 

2) All entrants must be currently enrolled at aarion University or be a member of the University 
faculty. 

3) No machine-copied fascimilies or carbon copies will be accepted. ORIGINALS ONLY. 

4) In the event of a tie, the entrant picliing the winning team and closest to the final score of the 
tiebreaker will be declared the winner. All decisions involving the tiebreaker will be made by 
the Sports Editor of the Clarion Call and will be Hnal. 



NAME 



ADDRESS. 



PHONE NUMBER, 



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COSTOF UVMe 

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'-4' 



HOURS: 

Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 










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.4^ 



800 Commercial Center Ir 

851 Main Street j|| 

Clarion, PA 16214 ^ 

226-8370 



Harriers place seventh at 
states championships 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984-13 



By David Pound 



The men's cross country team 
traveled to Slippery Rock University 
Saturday to compete for the State 
Championship. Clarion finished 
seventh out of the 14 teams that par- 
ticipated. Edinboro University, who 
placed in the 1, 5, 12, 14, and 19th 
positions, won the team meet. Luke 
Graham, also of Edinboro, took first 
in the individual honors. One- 
hundred runners competed in the 
meet. 

The Golden Eagle runners did an 
excellent job of getting out front 
early, and staying grouped together. 
The main goal was to run together as 
a team, and to finish in the middle of 
the pack. Clarion accomplished 
their goals by finishing seventh as 
they finished ahead of Slippery 
Rock, Mansfield, and Lock Haven; 
teams that they lost to during the 
regular season. 

Finishing 23rd overall and first for 
Clarion was Jim Snyder. Jim ran an 
excellent race and has been getting 
stronger each week. Greg Garstecki 
placed 28th and ran the best race of 
his college career. Scott DeLaney 
and Doug McConnell ran the course 



although they were still recovering 
from illnesses. Scott finished 32nd 
while Doug placed 45th. Bob Smith, 
who was suffering from a severely 
sprained ankle, finished 50th. 
Following Smith for Clarion were 
Jay Rogers and Pelligrino Ciccarel- 
lo. Clarion improved considerably 
from last year's state competition 
where they finished 13th. 

The top four teams behind 
Edinboro were: Indiana University 
of Pa., second; East Stroudsburg, 
third; Millersville, fourth, and Ship- 
pensburg, fifth. 

Following Graham in individual 
competition were: Bill King of 
Millersville, second; Steve Spence of 
Shippensburg, third; Mark Gerber 
of East Stroudsburg, fourth, and 
Tom Borawski of Edinboro, fifth. 

Coach Bill English gave all the 
credit of Clarion's excellent per- 
formance to everyone on the team. 
He said the team entered the meet 
with a very confident attitude and 
every runner gave 110 percent. He 
praised the whole team on their fine 
accomplishment of staying grouped 
together, something he has empha- 
sized throughout the season. The 
runners ran with determination and 



obtained their goals that they had 
set to achieve. 

English stated that Jim Snyder 
ran the best race of his life, and did 
an excellent job of finishing 23rd in 
the nation's strongest conference of 
runners. He commended the effort 
and determination of Scott 
DeLaney, Bob Smith and Doug 
McConnell, who due to injury or 
illness could not physically give 100 
percent. Pelligrino Ciccarello has 
improved considerably since last 
year, and is looking forward to next 
season. Senior Jay Rogers did an 
outstanding job for Clarion this 
year. This was Jay's first year of 
competition in cross country. Even 
though he lacked experience, he did 
an excellent job for the Golden 
Eagles. Coach English stated that 
Greg Garstecki has been a consist- 
ent performer all season. 

Coach Bill English congratulated 
his runners for a fine performance 
and for an excellent season. 

This Saturday Jim Snyder and 
possibly Greg Garstecki and Jay 
Rogers will compete in the NCAA 
Division II North East Regional 
Conference Championship. 



Hard work equals victory 



By Shelly Eckenroth 



Determined to improve on last 
year's disappointing season, the 12- 
member Clarion University wo- 
men's basketball team, coached by 
Doris Black, started practice on Oct. 
15. 

Returning lettermen of the squad 
are senior Rhonda Smith and soph- 
omores Kathy Young, Stephanie 
Woika, and Sherry Holderbaum. The 
remainder of the team consists of 
incoming freshmen Cathi Evans, 
Tammy Holman, Brenda Kelly, Lisa 
McAdoo, Karry Simmel, Kim 
Taylor, Jackie Turak and Angela 
Williams. 

The team's goal is to have a .500 
season, and along with the team 
goal, many of the individual players 
have personal goals which they want 
to achieve. 

Coach Black's outlook on the 
season is that the team is young and 
many of the freshmen are excited 
and fearful about playing college 



basketball. However, the returning 
lettermen add maturity to the young 
team as well as a great deal of lead- 
ership. The team has all around tal- 
ent, and Coach Black says that she 
could call on any ball player with 
confidence in getting the job done. 

Some changes have been made for 
the 1984-85 women's basketball 
league. First, they are playing with 
a smaller ball which is designed to 
improve ball handling and make the 
game more exciting. Coach Black 
predicts that eventually some 
women in the Division I League will 
be dunking in no time. While the idea 
of a smaller ball has many possible 
benefits, it seems to be creating 
problems in shooting accuracy. 
Coach Black says the smaller ball 
has been a benefit and predicts that 
the shooting accuracy will come in 
time. 

Another new rule this season is the 
back court rule. Once the player 
crosses the back court line, the ball 
will go to the opposing team. 



Coach Black's season philosophy 
is, "If you work hard, you can't 
lose." She also said, "We have over- 
all good basketball talent. My play- 
ers know how and like to win. The 
team has a strong sense of unity. We 
feel as coaches, that our overall 
program will be different with hard 
work. We're hoping it will pay off in 
the end." 






THE 



DEPOT 



; BUSES & USED BOOKS 



• 340 MAIN STREET 

• CLARION, PA. 16214 

• PH. 814-226-4534 



Senior spotlight 



By Michelle Michael 



Running seven days a week, twice 
a day has gotten Bob Smith, co- 
captain of this year's men's cross 
country team, where he is today - 
one of the lead runners. 

Bob Smith, 'Smitty', is a senior 
business major with a strong inter- 
est in real estate. 

Bob has only been running for the 
Clarion cross-country team for two 
years, in 1982 and this 1984 season. 
He also ran for Clarion track in 1983 
and in 1984. 

Bob was elected co-captain along 
with Scott Delaney by his other 
teammates. The reason behind his 
election is because of his develop- 
ment as a runner over the past year. 

Bill English, coach of the men's 
cross-country and track teams, said, 
"Bob has very good self-motivation, 
and as a result he has developed his 



running." He also added that he 
feels Bob has developed 300 percent 
as a runner because of his attitude 
and consistency. 

Smith, 5'U", 150 pound runner is 
having a winning season and has 
been sharing the lead spotlight with 
Delaney. The team's record now 
stands at 4-3, and they are looking 
for more wins when they take on 
Slippery Rock and Mansfield this 
Saturday. 

Coach English feels that Smith 
will be pushing for the 1500 meter 
record (3.53 minutes) in this 1985 
track season. The record is pres- 
ently held by George Drushel. Smith 
qualified for states last track season 
when he ran the 1500 meter in 4.01 
minutes. 

English added with a strong feel- 
ing, "I feel that his (Smith) being 
elected captain, has turned out to be 
an excellent leader 




HOURS: SUN.-THURS.il :00 A.M. TO 12:00 A.M. 
FRI.-SAT. 1 1 :00 A.M. T0 1 :00 A.M. 

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14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984 



Gridders fall to Cheyney In 20-10 upset 



By Mike Kondracki 



Michael Lee rushed for 108 yards 
as the Cheyney Wolves rolled up 373 
total offensive yards to upset the 
Golden Eagles 20-10 last Saturday. 

Pat Carbol completed 12 of 27 
passes for 205 yards, and Bob Green 
caught four of those passes for 66 
yards to lead the Golden Eagle of- 
fensive unit. Elton Brown's 74 yards 
rushing earned him Clarion's all- 
time leading rushing title. 

Kevin Ewing led the Golden Eagle 
defensive unit with 21 total tackles. 
Jerry Haslett chipped in with 17 
tackles, and Jon Haslett and Scott 
MacEwen added 16 each. 

Clarion took the opening half kick- 
off, and marched into Cheyney ter- 
ritory on a 16-yard pass play from 
Pat Carabol to John Marshall. Car- 
bol then completed a pass to Bob 
Green for 10 yards to the Cheyney 25- 
yard hne. Elton Brown advanced the 
ball to the 8 on four consecutive 
carries, and Ray Sanchez carried to 
the 3. A penalty on the next play 
moved the ball back to the 8 yard 
line, but Carbol gained two yards 
back on a keeper to the 6. Carbol 
then carried for a six-yard touch- 
down on a third down play and the 
Golden Eagles took the initial lead 7- 
with 9:26 left to play in the first 
quarter. 

There was no further scoring and 
the first quarter ended with Clarion 
leading 7-0. 

Clarion had the ball at the start of 
the second quarter, and they moved 
into Cheyney territory on a pass 
from Carbol to split end Russ Ford, 
which was good for 22 yards to the 
31. Elton Brown advanced the ball to 
the 23 on a draw play, and Sanchez 
carried to the 19 on the next play. 



The drive stalled here as Marshall 
fumbled on the next play and 
Vincent Williams recovered for 
Cheyney. 

The Wolves took over in their own 
territory, but this possession was 
short-lived as Sam Barbush picked 
off a third down Clark Perry passing 
attempt, and the Golden Eagles took 
over on their own 47. 

Carbol completed a 12-yard pass 
to Frohlich, and a 14-yard pass to 
Ford to move the ball to the Cheyney 
27. Sanchez carried for seven more 
yards from there, but this was as far 
as the Golden Eagles would get on 
this possession. A delay of game 
penalty sent them back to the 25, and 
Elton Brown could only gain two 
yards on the third down carry so 
Eric Fairbanks was called on for a 
40-yard field goal. Fairbanks' kick 
was good and the Golden Eagles led 
10-0 with 7 : 49 left in the half. 

Cheyney began play at th eir own 
20 following the kickoff , and moved 
to the 42 on a pass play from Perry to 
George Bethea. Cheyney then insert- 
ed Tracy Anderson at quarterback, 
and he moved the Wolves into 
Clarion territory on a six-yard run to 
the 46. Michael Lee gained six more 
up the middle to the 40 yard line. 
Clark Perry, who had since reenter- 
ed the game, then completed a pass 
to Brian Watson which was good for 
13 yards to the 28. Anderson then 
entered the game again and 
completed a 15-yard pass to Bethea 
which gave Cheyney a first and 10 a 
the Clarion 13-yard line. The 
Cheyney drive stalled at the 13, how- 
ever. Sam Barbush broke up a 
fourth down pass by Perry, and the 
Golden Eagle offense took over on 
downs. 
Clarion took over on their own 13, 




Elton Brown, No. 24, became Clarion's all-time leading rusher with 2,785 yards, surpassing Gary Frantz's 2,778 yards. 

photo by Rich Herman 



,•••••# 



###99##f»9«#*«« ••• 



c 
t 



but on the second play from scrim- 
mage Pat Carbol was intercepted by 
Terrance Capers, who returned it 21 
yards for a touchdown. The extra 
point attempt was no good and the 
Golden Eagles now led 10-6. 

Clarion took this 10-6 lead into the 
locker room at halftime, as there was 
no further scoring in the first half. 

Cheyney took possession following 
the second half kickoff at their own 
16-yard line. Michael Lee advanced 
the ball to the 20 on the first play 
from scrimmage, and Cheyney 
moved into Clarion territory on the 
next play after a 26-yard pass play 
and a facemask penalty against the 
Golden Eagles. Lee then carried two 
consecutive times to the Golden 
Eagle 37. Aggrey Quintyn carried to 
the 28 on an option play, and Perry 

# 
9 

• 



He is 




HUNGRY 



Cor 



ATTENTION 



carried to the 26 for a first down on a 
third down play. From there Perry 
completed a pass to Watson to the 
eight yard line, where the Wolves had 
a first and goal. Quintyn carried for 
two more to the six, and from there 
Lee scampered six yards for a Chey- 
ney touchdown. Once again the 
extra point was no good, but Chey- 
ney led for the first time in the 
game, 12-10, with 8:57 left in the 
third quarter. 

There was no further scoring in 
the third quarter and the score re- 
mained 12-10. 

Jeff Marshall recovered a Quintyn 
fumble at the start of the fourth 
quarter, and Clarion took over at 
their own 29. Brown carried two con- 
secutive times to the 40 yard line, 
but Pat Carbol was intercepted on 
the next play by Carl Wilburn and 
Cheyney took over on downs at their 
own 38. 

Michael Rackley carried four 
straight times and advanced the ball 
to the Clarion 31. From there Lee 
carried twice to the 18-yard line to 
set up the final Cheyney touchdown 
of the afternoon. Perry completed 
an 18-yard pass to Bethea for the 
touchdown. This time Cheyney elect- 
ed to go for the two-point conversion 
and Perry completed the pass to 
Terrance Reece for the two points. 




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Cheyney now led 20-10 with 8: 12 left 
in the game. 

Geoff Alexander returned the 
kickoff 23 yards to the Clarion 28 and 
that is where the Golden Eagles took 
over on offense. Elton Brown carried 
on the first play from scrimmage for 
a gain of seven yards. On this play 
Elton became Clarion's all-time 
leading rusher with 2,785 yards, sur- 
passing Gary Frantz, who played be- 
tween the years of 1976-79 and 
gained 2,778 yards. Carbol com- 
pleted a pass to Green on the next 
play for a gain of 10 yards, but Green 
fumbled on the play and Vince Wil- 
liams recovered for Cheyney at the 
Clarion 45. 

Cheyney moved down to the 
Clarion 16-yard line behind the run- 
ning of Lee, but the drive stalled 
there. Bethea was called in for this 
field goal attempt of 33 yards, but 
the kick was short and the score 
stood 20-10 in favor of Cheyney. 

The Golden Eagles would have one 
more attempt to score before the 
game ended. Following the missed 
field goal the Golden Eagles took 
over on their own 16. Carbol com- 
pleted a 17-yard pass to Brown, and 
a 20-yard pass to Brown to advance 
the ball to the Cheyney 47 yard line. 
From there Carbol completed an 18- 
yard pass to Bob Green, and a 14- 
yard pass to freshman John Watkins 
to the Cheyney 15. The drive was 
halted here as Carbol threw incom- 
plete passes on first and second 
down, and was sacked on third and 
fourth down. Cheyney took over with 
:38 left in the game and ran out the 
clock to come up with a surprising 
20-10 upset victory over the Golden 
Eagles. 

The loss drops the Golden Eagles 
to 5-3 overall with two games re- 
maining in regular season play. The 
Golden Eagles host the Bald Eagles 
of Lock Haven this Saturday at Me- 
morial Stadium. 



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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 1, 1984—15 



Spikers take third at 'Boro 



By Tiki Kahle 



Eagles try to stop Cheyney, but to no avail. 



photo by Rich Herman 



On Tuesday, Oct. 23, the Lady 
Eagles hosted Allegheny College in a 
best out of five match. The Lady Ea- 
gles won 15-5, 16-14, 4-15, and 15-2, in 
the second game they came from be- 
hind 3-13 to win. The three seniors of 
the team honored before the match 
were Janet Sobeck, Ellen Borowy, 
co-captain, and Lee Ann Wentzel, 
the assistant coach. 

This past weekend they partici- 
pated in the Edinboro Tournament. 
The Lady Eagles took an overall 
third place with Slippery Rock 



Stealing legends a tradition 



taking first and Edinboro second. 
The tournament started Friday 
night against Slippery Rock with a 
loss 13-15, 9-15 and against Mercy- 
hurst with a win 15-12, 15-13. Satur- 
day against Gannon they won 15-8, 
15-6 with 100 percent team serving. 
In the semi-finals they played Edin- 
boro and lost 12-15, 15-13, and 13-15. 
The Lady Eagles then played a con- 
solation game against Mercyhurst 
for third and fourth places and won 
17-15, 15-12. 

On Saturday, Clarion played three 
matches straight back to back, 
which made it a long day for the 
Lady Eagles with play from 9:30 
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. with a prior hour 



warm-up. Their losses were due to 
inconsistent aggressiveness. There 
was a complete team effort to keep 
play up for those five hours. Susie 
Seanor was voted to the All Tourney 
team as a hitter. 

The tournament was good prepar- 
ation for the Western Divisional 
Qualifiers for states this weekend 
at Edinboro. The teams in the play- 
offs will be: Clarion, Edinboro, Slip- 
pery Rock, California State, and 
lUP. The top two teams will then 
advance to the state playoffs, which 
will be at the number one team's 
court. 

The Lady Eagles' overall record is 
23-11 and conference record is 4-3. 



For someone who died in 1931, 
former Notre Dame football coach 
Knute Rockne still gets around 
pretty well. 

Or at least his bronze bust does. 

Over the last year the 100 pound, 
two-foot tall Knute Rockne bust has 
attended at least one student gradu- 
ation party, visited the shores of 
Lake Michigan, and journeyed to 
Indianapolis recently for the Notre 
Dame-Purdue football game. 

The bust, affectionately known 
around campus as "Rockne" first 
vanished from Notre Dame's 
Rockne Memorial last May 3. 

Two weeks later, editors at the 
student paper, The Observer, were 
surprised to receive a ransom note 
and photograph of the campus 
football legend sunning at an 
unnamed beach. 

Among other things, the note 
warned that Rockne would not 
return "until the students get their 
l)eer," apparently referring to a new 
student drinking policy that restricts 
on-campus beer consumption, ex- 
plains Observer editor Bob Vonder- 
heide. 



The color picture showed the sun- 
glass-clad Rxx:kne reposhig in the 
sand, surrounded by a boom-box 
radio, a keg of beer, and a frisbee. 

In the meantime, the empty pedes- 
tal in Rockne Memorial became too 
much to bear for many students and 
administrators. Hoping to recapture 
at least some of the aura of the miss- 
ing Rockne, officials replaced it with 
a smaller replica dubbed "Rockne 
Junior." 

Over the summer, campus police, 
befuddled by the mystery of the 
missing bust, began working on 
leads that Rockne was hiding out 
somewhere in Los Angeles, recalls 
Notre Dame Security Chief Glenn 
Terry. 

On September 11, a few days after 
a Notre Dame-Purdue football 
game, Observer editors received a 
second anonymous note and several 
photographs showing Rockne in a 
Purdue sweatshirt, standing in front 
of a welcome sign to Purdue Univer- 
sity in Lafayette, Ind. 

Rockne, it seems, isn't the first 
Notre Dame sculpture to take flight 
in the night. 



"There was a similar disappear- 
ance in the 1950s involving the statue 
of Father Theodore Sorin— founder 
of the university — which was kept 
on display in one of the residence 
halls," recalls Dick Conklin, public 
information director 

"The statue mysteriously disap- 
peared one night, and later we began 
getting postcards with postmarks 
from all around the world — Paris, 
London, Rome — saying things like 
'Having a wonderful time, wish you 
were here,' and signed 'Father 
Sorin'." 

Eventually, Father Sorin was 
found buried in a gulf course sand 
trap, "none the worse for wear." 

Big Rockne, meanwhile, is back 
on display in the lobby of the Rockne 
Memorial, this time anchored to the 
pedestal by steel rods and concrete. 

Terry "thinks" the bust is safe 
from future pranksters, but he also 
concedes there's really no way to 
stop Rockne from running off with 
another group of determined prank- 
sters, short of removing the bust 
from public display. 



Shooters top lUP 



The Rifle team started off their 
season with a win over lUP Friday 
night at the lUP range. They also 
further demonstrated their distinc- 
tion of being the only co-educational 
intercollegiate sport at Qarion, as 
one of their female members made 
the Top 5. , 

Top shooters for Clarion : 

GregFiscus 262 

Scott Berry 260 

MarkSadecki 250 

MikeSherk 242 

Kamie Roessing 240 

Team total 1254 



lUP scored 1182 with their shoot- 
ers and scores: 

Dave Barelick 254 

Gary Hobar 243 

Steve Hornick 235 

Mike Klein 227 

Dave Hozlock 223 

Also shooting for Clarion were: 

Andy Klaus 239 

Leon Mosher 233 

Tom Weible 232 

Keith Kintzel 227 

John Pionzio 204 




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New finals schedule adopted 



By Ken Ream 



This year Clarion University stu- 
dents will follow a new, simplified 
final exam schedule According to 
Sue McMillen, Assistant to the Reg- 
istrar, the new final schedule was 
devised to reduce the large number 
of conflicts students have encoun- 
tered in past finals schedules. 

Under the new system, the finals 
are scheduled at the time each class 
meets. Finals for classes that have 
their first meeting of the week on 
Monday or Wednesday at 8 a.m., 10 
a.m., 12 noon, 2 p.m., or 4 p.m. will 
be held Monday at those times. 
Gasses that meet at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., 
1 p.m. or 3 p.m. will have their finals 
on Wednesday at those times. For 
classes that meet for the first time 
on Tuesday or Thursday at 8 a.m., 11 
a.m. or 2 p.m. finals will be held on 



Tuesday at those times. Classes that 
meet at 9:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. or 3:30 
p.m. will have their finals on Thurs- 
day at those times. Evening classes 
will have their finals at their regular 
class time and day. 

Friday will be used as a make-up 
day for students who have three or 
more finals scheduled on the same 
day. Saturday finals have been elim- 
inated. All finals will be held in the 
rooms where the class regularly 
meets. 

According to McMillen, the new 
schedule has been considered for 
four or five months. Research was 
conducted as to how effective sim- 
ilar schedules have been at other 
schools. She is optimistic that the 
new finals schedule will be success- 
ful at Clarion University, and says 
the Registrar's office is very in- 
terested in feedback from the 
student body. 



Faculty Senate displeased with 
revised final exam schedule 



By Tim Slaper 



Fall's final exam schedule, re- 
vised last summer, has caused some 
unrest among both faculty and stu- 
dents. 

The schedule, drawn up by the 
registrar, was revised because fac- 
ulty wanted a shorter finals week 
with fewer conflicting tests. 

The major differences from the 
previous schedule are: A four day 
exam week rather than five; more 
study time before the week starts, 
and individual tests for multi-section 
classes. 

Among the Faculty Senate, there 
are those who are for the new sched- 
ule and those who oppose it. All of 
them, however, are displeased with 



two things. First of all, the schedule 
was reviewed by the Council of 
Deans without being submitted to 
the Senate for their approval, and 
second, teachers with multiple sec- 
tions now have to deal with an in- 
creased workload. 

According to Mrs. Susan Traynor, 
the new schedule will cause a num- 
ber of problems. Making up several 
different forms of a test is both diffi- 
cult and time-consuming, and with 
up to 48-72 hours between tests, stu- 
dents in the later sections will have 
access to the questions. "There are 
only so many ways to ask a 
question," said Mrs. Traynor. "It 
does something to the integrity of 
the test and I don't think it's fair." 

Despite its shortcomings, how- 



ever, the new^ schedule does have 
some positive aspects. Finals week 
is now shorter, tests will conflict less 
often and the students will have 
more time to prepare for them. "I 
like the new schedule," said Dr. 
Brigette Callay, "because it is less 
confusing for me and the hours are 
more reasonable. The students also 
have more study time, and they get 
to go home earlier too. I think the 
basic idea is good, but it still needs to 
be refined for those teachers with 
multiple sections." 

The exam schedule was refined to 
"streamline" it, and further refine- 
ment in the near future appears un- 
likely. "I think it's too late to change 
the schedule this year," said Dr. 
Gregg Lacy. "About the future, how- 
ever, I don't know." 




Vol. 56 No. 9 



The Clarion Call 



Thursday, Nov. 8, 1984 



Clojumj ihuuiwu^ 0^ f^eiuiA-jj^wuaQ; 



McKeever Environmental Center teaches us to care for our world 



By Christine McKeever 



In America today there are lit- 
erally hundreds of thousands of 
spots clearly invaded by polluters 
and consumers of our environment, 
but how many places exist that edu- 
cate people to take better care of the 
world around them? 

The McKeever Environment 
Learning Center, 200 acres of rich 
land, located in Sandy Lake, Penn- 
sylvania, has been dedicated to this 
very object for 10 years now. 

The McKeever Environmental 
Learning Center educates people 
about the air, water, soil, and energy 
surrounding them, comments Mr. 
Richard Touvell, director of McKee- 
ver. Main concepts that are dealt 
with concern how to relate to and 
respect the environment. 



America's resources are slim, and 
are growing thinner everyday. Con- 
servation is the key to tomorrow, is 
McKeever's philosojAy. McKeever's 
whole concept revolves around the 
education of people of all ages to 
conserve and learn how to become 
keepers of our natural resources. 

McKeever reaches their goal by 
offering educational programs, at a 
low cost, to people of all ages. H ikes, 
workshops, canoe rides, and films 
comprise only a small number of 
the various activities awaiting at 
McKeever. At McKeever's 10th 
anniversary celebration, activities 
such as the Sunrise Canoe Paddle 
took place. 

Wildlife is observed through a 
canoe, starting at sunrise, and 
pointed out with the assistance from 
a local wildlife expert. This activi- 



ty is suggested for teens and adults. 

For the young children, there are 
children's theatre performances. 
Most activities are directed toward 
an age group. If an activity for 
adults is scheduled, an alternate 
activity for the children at the same 
time is also planned. 

Excursions at McKeever can last 
an afternoon, a whole day, two days, 
or three days. Trips from local 
schools, local groups, or interested 
citizens can all be scheduled for the 
time period of their choice. 

While the parents are off on their 
activity, the children are guided by 
vibrant leaders, interns, and student 
teachers. These interns and student 
teachers obtain on-the-job-training 
and college credit for their work. 
Clarion University participates in 
the program and even administers 



the McKeever center itself. Besides 
Clarion, 20 other universities and 
colleges also depend on McKeever 
for their professional training. 

The McKeever Center has been 
successfully running for 10 years. 
Back in 1964, Ivan McKeever, a 
retired State conservationist for the 
Soil Conservation Service of the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture, shared his dream of a cen- 
ter for educating people on conser- 
vation and ecology to six local resi- 
dents of Sandy Lake, who would 
later constitute the Sandy Lake con- 
servancy. These men purchased the 
200 acre site so as to preserve the 
land until the commonwealth could 



purchase it from them. 

Clarion University decided to ad- 
minister McKeever after the center 
was viewed as containing an op- 
portunity for teacher training, in- 
volvement with local school 
programs, ecological techniques, 
and a promise to work with other 
groups to preserve the region. 

McKeever is run by the State 
System of Higher Education and 
funded by Pennsylvania tax. The 
McKeever foundation formed on 
August 19, 1983, continues to seek fi- 
nancial assistance to keep 
McKeever up to its high standards. 
McKeever receives 10,000 people a 
year to educate one person at a time. 




CAS makes final bid 

for dues collection to SSHE 



A final offer to reopen negotiations 
on the development of a feasible 
dues collection system for a state- 
wide student advocacy organization 
was made at a recent meeting of the 
Board of Governors of the State Sys- 
tem of Higher Education. 

The offer made to the Board of the 
Commonwealth Association of Stu- 
dents (CAS) was to develop an op- 
tional check-off system. This sys- 
tem, which is similar to a compro- 
mise rejected by the Board last Fall, 
would allow a student to pay the CAS 
fee with tuition payment. 

The offer was made partially due 
to a recent federal court decision 
which upheld the constitutionality of 
mandatory refundable fees, a collec- 
tion system used by CAS from 1978 
until it was rescinded by the Board 
last Fall. 

"Although we have introduced leg- 



islation into the General Assembly 
which would require that a check-off 
system be instituted, we would still 
prefer to develop an agreeable fee 
mechanism with the Board," said 
Michael Burk, Executive Director of 
CAS. "This approach will allow for 
the strained relations which cur- 
rently exist between us to be relax- 
ed, and it will let us get on with our 
business of developing a strong State 
System of Higher Education which 
meets the needs of our students." 

Burk added that he felt the Galda 
decision clearly supports the use of 
mandatory refundable fees for or- 
ganizations such as CAS. "We 
simply want to develop a fee mech- 
anism which will give students the 
easiest opportunity to make a free 
and conscious decision concerning 
CAS" he said, "something which the 
See CAS. ..Page 11 



DMnna Mertz, Clarion student, takes time Tuesday evening to cast her ballot. Poll attendants at Marwick-Boyd re- 
ported the turnout of voters to t>e good. Photo by Chuck Lizza, Photography Editor 



Editorial 

Hide Park 

Around the World 

Debate team 

New businesses . . 



ON THE INSIDE 

Introducing 8 

2 Nuclear power 9 

3 Classifieds, Only at Clarion 

4 Chandler, CB Corner 12 

6, 7 Football 16 1 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Nov. 8. 1984 




In recent weeks, a number of students have asked if The Clarion 
Call accepts and prints Letters to the Editor. The answer is yes, with 
the simple requirements that the letter be signed, submitted to the Call 
office or the mailbox in 105 Riemer by the noon Friday deadline, and 
with the understanding that the letter can be edited for foul use of langu- 
age and, in some cases, for length. Signatures can be withheld upon re- 
quest if absolutely necessary. 

As far as content goes, the power of the pen and press is at the 
disposal of readers as much as it is for reporters and editors. Got a com- 
plaint?, someone you're disturbed with?, or have some information to 
share?, the newspaper is public record and can get some results if a 
letter is well written. 

In the Nov. 1 edition of the Call two letters were published. Each 
addressed the recent political campaigns at the local and national levels. 
Neither necessarily solved world problems, but the authors took the 
opportunity to express their opinions about things important to them. It 
was their hope, too, by submitting letters for publication, that readers 
would also feel strongl